Lists

The Mayne Report Rich List


October 17, 2020

This list tracks Australians who have accumulated net assets exceeding $20 million, although some entries haven't been updated for several years. We've got almost 1800 names. and would suggested additions emailed to stephen@maynereport.com. Entries that are italicised may no longer be worth $20 million due to falling share prices or business failures.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Soheil Abedian: living on the Gold Coast but Iranian born, the CEO of listed property developer Sunland owns an 18% stake or 45.7m shares, which was worth more $200 million at its peak. Stock back to around 60c in early 2020. James Packer came and went as a Sunland shareholder and director after the Dubai expansion ran into trouble. His son Sahba Abedian also owns 6 million shares in his own right.

Andrew Abercrombie: the founder and former CEO of leasing company FlexiGroup, which listed in late 2006. He owns shares worth more than $100 million. The stock plunged from more than $3 before the GFC to a low of 22c, but it was back up to $1.85 in early 2020 so there's still plenty of money to be made clipping the ticket on transactions. Hosted a tribute dinner for Peter Costello at his Melbourne mansion in late 2008 but then lost out to Kelly O'Dwyer in the 2009 Higgins preselection contest. Still prominent in the Liberal Party and donated to defend Andrew Bolt's race-baiting. The Australian valued at $512 million in 2019.

Russell Aboud: former non-executive chairman of full-service broker Ord Minnett and a former director of ASX. He swapped his stake in Ord Minnett for 10.2 million Auswealth shares and also owns 22,382 ASX shares, suggesting he's worth north of $20 million.

Dr Alex Abrahams: founder and executive director of the Pacific Smiles Group which operates 22 dental clinics and 6 eye clinics in NSW and Victoria. Also controls organisations in NSW and Victoria that train dental nurses and provides employment on completion of their training.

Steve Ackerie: the grandson of a hairdresser, he arrived from North Lebanon to ply the family trade. In 1964 he opened his first salon in Longreach which has expanded into 55 salons becoming Australia's largest chain. He also owns a restaurant that caters for over 1.5 million people a year which pushes his wealth north of $50 million. Also once dated Liz Hayes.

Graham Acton: controls the Acton Land & Cattle Company which shelled out $37 million to pick up the Carpentaria and Lyndhurst properties out of the break-up of AMP's old Stanbroke Pastoral empire in 2004. BRW has claimed he's worth more than $200 million.

William Adams: formerly the largest shareholder in Tattersall's and direct descendant of founder George Adams' brother who sat on the board initially after the float. His stake was worth about $80 million on listing, but made a wise decision to sell-down before John Brumby's Victorian pokies licence bombshell.

Karen Adcock: the founder of Pandora Jewelery sold her Sydney home in Newport for $9 million in early 2020.

Brook Adcock: graduated from The Australian Defence Force Academy in 1986, was a RAAF Pilot until 1996, a Qantas Pilot until 2008, founded Pandora Jewellery Australia in 2004, and his own successful private investment company, Adcock Private Equity, in 2009, the same year he paid $14.6 million for a waterfront property in Newport on Sydney's North Shore.

Adler family: Rodney Adler and his sisters inherited wealth from their father Larry, the founder of FAI Insurance. Rodney ended up blowing plenty on the HIH crash but the family overall still has well north of $20 million.

Terry Agnew: property investor in Sydney's commercial district, in 2008 he completed a swap with the Stockland Group. He acquired his property for $121 million in 2002, and swapped it for property worth $225 million in one of the largest deals of its kind. Clearly quite a property player, even if little known.

Ahrens family: whilst the steel industry isn't booming quite like it was, this 100-year-old Adelaide-based family company soldiers on with its engineering and steel fabrication business that employs 200 staff.

Len Ainsworth and Sons: in the 1950s, Len Ainsworth began the gaming machine maker Aristocrat. While no longer active within the company, the family still own more than $2 billion worth of Aristocrat shares, whilst Len controlled the separate Ainsworth Game Technology until selling out for almost $500 million to an Austrian firm in 2017.The Australian valued him at $3.252 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $3.25 billion in 2019

Charlie Aitken and family: as former executive directors and large shareholders of Southern Cross Equities, Angus and Charlie Aitken benefited from the 2008 sale to Bell Financial Group for $150 million, albeit in stock not cash. Bell shares were still lagging at about 80c in early 2019, but Charlie is now out running his own investment fund.

Albert family: Jacques Albert founded the Albert music business in 1890 when he began importing violins to Australia. With large interests in property and investments, the Albert family also own a valuable library of music copyright including Cole Porter and Irving Berlin. BRW claimed $229 million in 2010.

Ernest Albers: a former director of Moby Oil & Gas and Bass Strait Oil Company. He used to be a director of MEO Australia until he clashed with CEO Chris Hart and sold all his stock for at least $30 million. His wealth is said to be north of $70 million and he went on to chair 3 other listed companies including Energex.

Dale Alcock: managing director of Alcock Brown-Neaves Group which operates a number of building companies in Perth including Dale Alcock Homes, which makes about $15 million in a good year and has paid plenty in dividends to Mr Alcock over the years.The Australian valued at $330 million in 2019. Was President of the Fremantle Dockers in 2020.

John Alexander: the former PBL CEO was paid $6.6 million in 2006-07 and the demerger of the media and gaming interests saw his $15 million contract paid out. Finally finished up as executive chair of Crown in 2019 after being paid $20m plus since the PBL demerger but remains a director of Crown.

Elizabeth Alexander: long-time CSL director and chair who retired in 2011 with 19,370 ordinary shares which, if retained today, would be worth almost $20 million. Also made plenty as a professional director at companies such as Boral, Amcor, Medibank Private and as a KPMG partner.

Tony Alford: former CEO and largest shareholder in Retail Food Group which owns the Donut King and Brumby's Bakeries franchises. When the share price peaked at more than $7 in 2015, his 22 million shares were worth more than $100 million but it has since plunged to be trading around 30c in early 2019. Resigned in July 2017 and has sold down much of his holding.

Graham Allan: the former Shell executive was briefly John Elliott's Harlin Holdings offsider in the early 1990s, but then built a career at global restaurants giant Yum Brands where he became chief operating officer in 2003 and has made more than $20 million for his efforts, as this Forbes profile suggests.

Allen family: paid $13 million to bus mogul Jim Bosnjak in 2009 and 2010 for two apartments at The Toaster overlooking the Sydney Opera House.

Terrence Allen: the former CEO and chairman of Herald Resources who resigned in August 2008 still owning about 15 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $3 in July 2008 when he was worth more than $40 million, and bottomed at 10c in December 2008, but was taken over in 2009 at 93c.

Robert Allenby: one of Australia's most successful golfers who has earned more than $30 million over his long career.

Janine Allis: a former model who founded the booming Boost Juice chain and is now writing books talking about her success.

Ori Allon: The Australian valued at $483 million in 2019.

Alstergren family: it all began with Edvaad Alstergren who emigrated to Tasmania from Norway, married an Australian, Marjorie, had seven children and made a fortune in timber. When he died, the company, which included Softwoods Holdings and Timber Holdings Tasmania was taken over by CSR.

Maurice Alter: migrated to Melbourne from Poland in the 1950s and is now a billionaire courtesy of a burgeoning property empire which started with two shops and a bank building in Kew and extended to shopping centres such as Forest Hill Chase (since sold) and Epping Plaza. The Australian valued him at $2.851 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued him at $2.33 billion.

Spiros Alysandratos
: arriving from Greece in 1959, at age 20 he opened his first travel agency which grew into Consolidated Travel - Australia's largest privately owned distributor of airline products. Now also owns 17% of Helloworld. BRW claimed $217 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.02 billion in 2019.

Kenneth Ambrecht
: former non-executive director of Fortescue Metals who owned 750,000 shares and served for 9 years until 2012.

Marcus Ambrose: kicked goals in the lucrative California-based US NASCAR series over many years which led to substantial earnings, such as an estimated $5.4 million in 2009 alone.

Sonia Amoroso & Peter Nicholas: founded Cat Media, a pharmaceutical and cosmetic company using natural products. The company was sold in 2006 and while Nicholas started a haircare company, Amoroso diversified into fashion and publishing.

Peter Anastasiou: the executive chairman of listed bio-tech company Ummuron in 2020 reportedly paid almost $10 million for a sprawling 33ha estate on Phillip Island in Victoria.

Anderson family: owning a bicycle repair shop in the 1950s, the Brisbane-based family have since built their wealth through property and manufacturing, in particular, GWA international – makers of taps, sinks, and a range of household products. They own around 28 million shares. The BRW claimed $420 million in 2010.

Chris & Virginia Anderson: celebrities in their home country of New Zealand, they run property company Javica and made the BRW Young Rich list with an estimated wealth of more than $70 million.

Tim Anderson: founder and co-director of Madman, a DVD distribution business which was sold in 2006 for $34.5 million to Funtastic which has since struggled.

Peter Anderton: former executive chairman of the struggling Australian Ethanol but did far better from his 2.25 million shares in African coal play Riversdale Mining which was taken over for a hefty $16.50 a share by Rio Tinto in 2011, although this turned into a complete disaster, for Rio.

Andrews family: big players in the Sydney meat industry and now major exporters. Also have a large but little known Sydney property portfolio.

Duncan Andrews: made his name running the Australian Ratings credit assessment business in the 1980s but then made his second pile developing Victorian golf courses such as Thirteenth Beach near Barwon Heads and The Dunes on the Mornington Peninsula.

Bill Andrews: one of the three major shareholders who profited from the $57 million purchase of Brisbane-based plaintiff law firm Trilby Misso by Slater & Gordon for an eye-popping $57 million in 2010. He stopped working for the firm several years earlier. However, Slater and Gordon later went broke in 2017 so his wealth depends on whether he cashed out near the top or not.

Tony Antonopoulos: a big player in the nursing home business, first through Estia and later through Heritage Care which owns 9 centres including Epping Gardens which was hit hard by the COVID-19, as this Fairfax piece explains.

Clive Appleton: the former managing director of Centro and Gandel thought he'd hit paydirt at APN Property Group when his 10 million shares peaked at $40 million, but the GFC almost sent the company under as Clive's paper wealth took a serious hit. Stock still wallowing around 40c in early 2019. Still serving on property boards in 2019.

Don Argus
: made about $40 million from his time as CEO of NAB and a further $5-10 million from his tenure as chairman of BHP-Billiton which finally ended in February 2010.

Michael and George Argyrou: founded prolific Melbourne-based construction company Hickory Developments in 1991.

Armanasco family: former owners of farmland in Pakenham Victoria, now known as Worthington estate, which was acquired in 2004 by Central Equity and on-sold in late 2008 for $24 million.

John Armati: collected $69 million when his Macquarie Publications business was sold to Rural Press in 1995 and is now part of the bigger Fairfax Media empire.

Josephine Armstrong: a former school teacher and substantial Liberal Party benefactor who in the 2007 Federal election donated $600,000 over two installments. She made more than $30 million from a 2006 sale of some land in Perth at the peak of the market.

Mark Armstrong: the CEO of ASX listed RateMyAgent who owned 66m in shares in early 2020 when the stock was at 39c.

Sam Arnaout: CEO of development and hospitality group Iris Capital. In 2019, his company bought a $56 million pokies pub in Sydney.

David Archer: formerly the major shareholder in Savage Resources, a stake left to him by his stepfather. Also made a pile in technology companies, not to mention the sale of his stepfather's property at Point Piper for about $12 million. Divides his time between the town house in London, the magnificent chateau in France and the award-winning Archer House at Whale Beach.

Benni Aroni: ran his own Melbourne-based law firm for 16 years until 1998 and then made plenty as a small shareholder in the giant Eureka Tower at Southgate which should arguably have never got a permit to go so high. Also profited from a range of other property development deals in Melbourne.

Peter Arvanitis: the founder of aged care provider Estia Health who dumped his $55 million on resigning in 2016-17. A well timed exit given the mass COVID-19 outbreaks at two of its Melbourne nursing homes.

Nora Atkinson: top 20 shareholder of Perth-based TFS Corporation which was into forestry and fragrances. Owned about 6 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.50 in September 2008 when the stake was worth more than $9 million. Changed its name to Quintis before going broke in 2017 after a campaign by short sellers.

Nigel & Tania Austin: Nigel started Cotton On, a low-priced fashion store, at 21 in Geelong and has since expanded with 240 stores across Australia. Made BRW Young Rich List. The Australian valued him at $1.773 billion in 2019.The Australian valued at $1.77 billion in 2019

Chris Aylward: the man who ran the Grollo construction empire for many years got rich on paper by founding APN Property Group where his 49 million shares used to be worth more than $100 million before the GFC.

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David Baffsky: Westpac dropped plenty on his various hotel interests in the recession we had to have, but he has bounced back and is a big player in property who spent years chairing Accor Asia Pacific, the largest hotel manager in the Asia-Pacific. Was a profitable private property player with Wizard founder Mark Bouris in the early 1990s and a wizard tax lawyer with all sorts of interesting clients.

Matt & Stewart Bailey: after selling their sales and marketing company Bailey Group, Australia's largest diversified sales & marketing company, to Photon, the brothers remained in the business to maximise their profit share, so the company's debt and earn out crisis in 2010 can't have been much fun. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Theo Baker: founder of IT services company Powerlan which almost died with the dot com crash, but his profits rose sharply after the float of a software company, Clarity International, of which Powerlan owned a large stake.

Simon Baker: the former CEO of www.realestate.com.au owned about 3.5 million shares when fired in 2009 which would be worth more than $300 million if retained today. Has also made a few private investments such as a $4 million play buying www.artshub.com.au.


Baillieu family: Melbourne property interests and large holdings in mutual trusts, established the wealth of this blue-blood family, which is best known for the Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu but dates its wealth back to the 1800s. Some of their property holdings include Melbourne's most prestigious postcodes. The BRW claimed $387 million in 2010.

Nick Bain: the former head of infrastructure at Allco Finance Group owned 11.75 million that peaked in value at $150 million when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so residual wealth unknown.

Baiada family: behind Baiada Poultry, which is Australia's third-largest chicken processor in Australia. The BRW claimed $215 million in 2010.

Nick Balagiannis: starting out manufacturing pinball machines, he continued into manufacturing gaming machines, forming his company Olympic Amusements which was sold for $170 million to American company IGT in 1997.

Ian Ballis: purchased the former Ford chassis component plant in North Geelong for $7.1 million, which was considered a bargain given that the previous owners, Queensland-based City Pacific, paid around $18 million for the site in 2007. However, was attempting to sell more than $20 million worth of commercial real estate a couple of year later, suggesting there may have been some balance sheet issues.


Kevin Bamford: part-owner of the 2010 Melbourne Cup winner, Americain, and chairman of Label Makers, Australia's largest label producer.

Eric Bana
: beginning in comedy, he has branched out to become an accomplished actor with such roles as Chopper and The Incredible Hulk. He is one of Australia's most successful exports to Hollywood.

Brad Banducci: The Woolworths CEO owns about $20 million worth of shares in Zip which dates back to his time as the company's CFO. Throw in his multi million annual salary at Woolworths and his 195,808 ordinary Woolworths shares worth $7.6 million (he also has incentive schemes with another 540,000 shares in play) , and he doesn't need to work again. Asked about this at the recent Woolworths AGM, chairman Gordon Cairns said Banducci was the hardest working CFO he'd come across and showed no signs of losing motivation after his Zip payday.

Andrew Banks: legendary recruiting industry pioneer who co-founded Morgan & Banks in the 1980s which was then sold. He is a large stakeholder in, and managing director of Talent2 which was floated and has a market cap of more than $100 million before it was privatised in 2012. The BRW claimed $282 million in 2010.

Anthony Barakat
: this former hairdresser turned property developer made a tidy $80 million profit on a group of four Sydney CBD commercial properties he sold in 2007-08 for $127 million.

Andrew Barkla: the CEO of IDP Education received statutory pay of $37.7 million in 2018-19 as overly generous long term incentives initially agreed by Seek and the university sector paid out big time.

Fred Barlow
: a large grain farmer from Mungindi in NSW who appeared prominently on the AWB share register as a considerable shareholder before the business was taken over. Also faced controversy over water rights.

Jeremy Barlow: former chairman of Bandanna Energy who owned more than 100 million shares which were worth $60 million in early 2012 with the stock around 60c before a subsequent tumble. In 2010 BRW claimed he was worth $118 million.

Harry Barrett
: Sydney bookie and car dealer who owns large tracts of Lennox Heads, just south of Byron Bay. His car dealerships have a big presence on Parramatta Road and got lots of cred when he took on Kerry Packer at the race track.

Barro family
: a teenage David Barro arrived in Australia from Italy in 1936 and died in 2009 after amassing a concrete fortune. The AFR valued the family at $1.65 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $916 million in 2019

David Barry
: former director of GWA International who owned about 12 million shares when the stock peaked almost $5 in April 2007 before the GFC.

David and Peter Bartter: former owners of the Steggles brand, the brothers were once Australia's second largest poultry producers before selling out to private equity. The BRW claimed $305 million in 2010.

Bill Barry-Cotter
: former owner of Gold Coast boat building company Riviera.

Fred Bart: entrepreneur who spent more than $30 million on a Point Piper mansion in 2019 and owns a range of investments including a stake in Audio Pixel Holdings worth more than $100 million in June 2020.

Peter Bartels: then Foster's chairman Nobby Clarke did himself no credit by agreeing to an $8 million payout when his departing CEO refused to sign the accounts in 1992. Outrageously, this was staggered over 5 years so it never showed up as a big lump sum and the market was never told. Also made about $10 million as CEO of Coles Myer but this ended badly as well.

Greg Bartlett
: former senior executive of Westpac whose 840,000 shares were worth almost $30 million at the peak.

Charles Bass
: a former non-executive director of Queensland coal miner Aquila Resources who owned 13 million shares when the stock peaked at $17. The BRW valued him at $342 million in 2010.

Andrew Bassat: co-founder and CEO of Seek.com, Australia's leading online jobs site with a significant offshore business as well. Owns shares worth more than $100 million. The Australian valued at $329 million in 2019.

Paul Bassat: co-founder and former joint CEO of Seek.com, Australia's leading online jobs site. Made more than $100 million from his Seek shares and now runs venture capital fund Square Peg.

Bruce Batchelor: Queensland-based founder of A-Mart All Sports, he sold his 70 per cent stake for around $77 million.

Edmund Bateman family
: the late founder and former major shareholder of the pathology, health technology and medical centre company, Primary Health Care, who was valued by BRW at $458 million at the peak.

George Batsakis: an executive director and long time senior analyst at JB Were who owned more than 1% of the equity held through the Goldman Sach's Australian equity partnership before the Wall Street giant mopped up the minorities for a tidy sum after the GFC.

Peter Batten: former managing director of Bannerman Resources, an iron-ore wannabe in the Pilbara, who owned almost 10 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $4 in February 2008 when he was worth more than $30 million but then went into decline.

Douglas Battersby: former director of Eastern Star Gas who owned around 30 million shares. Was taken over for $924 million or 90c per share, paid entirely with Santos shares in 2011.

Stephen Baxter: co-founder and executive director of PIPE Networks, a telecommunications provider, who owned about 8 million shares before the business was sold in 2009 for $375 million to TPG.

Julian Beale: former chairman of Adacel Techologies, a communications company. The former Liberal politician was also a director of Visy Industries and former father-in-law to Bill Shorten.Bill Beament: executive chairman of gold miner Northern Star who sold 6.6 million shares for $26 million in 2019 but in February 2020 still retained 3.66 million shares worth around $50 million.



Stuart Beattie: arguably Australia's most successful screenwriter in Hollywood who managed to produce the blockbuster GI Joe in only seven weeks during the big writers strike a few years back.

Julian Beaumont: spent 24 years with Macquarie Bank, including as head of group operations from 1983 until 1996. The tell tale signs of wealth are the extensive contemporary art collection and various arts gigs. Represented Macquarie on the ConnectEast board.

Christian Beck: major stakes in Australian Technology Innovators. The Australian valued at $708 million in 2019.

Max Beck: the former carpenter and largest shareholder in Melbourne-based property group Becton which subsequently went broke. The BRW claimed $330 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $692 million in 2019.

Max Begely: founder of Matrix Composites & Engineering.

Belgiorno-Nettis family: patriarch Franco was the son of an Italian train driver, who arrived in Australia in 1951, joining up with Carlo Salteri to form engineering giant Transfield. The two split after the disastrous Transurban construction contract, but Franco's family subsequently became billionaires on paper as shares in Transfield Services soared but then later tumbled before being taken over by a Spanish company.
The 2010 BRW claimed $770 million.

Bell Family
: founded Bell Securities almost 40 years ago and is now a leading Australian-based and owned provider of stockbroking, investment and financial advisory services. In 2007, Colin was executive chairman and Lewis and Andrew were executive directors who enjoyed combined salaries of more than $15 million. The salaries were slashed with the 2007-08 Bell Financial Group float but the family owns around 55 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $2.40 in January 2008.

Anthony Bell: runs accounting firm Bell Partners under a corporate model rather than a partnership one, to make his company more flexible. Made BRW Young Rich List and is famous for looking after sporting stars.

Tony Bell: the former managing director of Southern Cross Broadcasting walked out with almost $20 million when Fairfax and Macquarie Media bought the company in late 2007.

Richard Bell
: founded Reverse Corp in 1998 after working both in Australia and the US. Reverse Corp's expansion to the UK initially expanded profits but the shares tanked to just 3.8c in early 2012, well shy of the peak above $5 a few years earlier. The BRW once claimed he was worth $137 million but much of that has evaporated.

Jack Bendat: migrating to Australia over 40 years ago, he arrived with ambitions of being a farmer. He soon moved into shopping centres and then later television, radio and wine. Each time, skillfully knowing when to sell out and move on to the next challenge. The charitable owner of the Perth Wildcats basketball team and a large portfolio of listed stocks continue to drive his wealth. The BRW claimed $606 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $672 million in 2019.

Larry Benke: former executive director of Worley Parsons who owned about 1.2 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $53 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million.

Angela Bennett: sister of Michael Wright, she is an heir to the huge Hancock-Wright Pilbara iron-ore royalty which now delivers more than $100 million a year. She sold her sprawling mansion in Mosman Park, WA, in December 2009 for a new Australian record price of $57.5 million. The 2010 BRW claimed $2.09 billion. Forbes valued at $US980 million in March 2010. The Australian valued her at $1.928 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.91 billion in 2019

Ian Bennett
: previously made the Beach Energy top 20 list with 6.88 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.80 in July 2006 when he was worth more than $12 million.

Tony Berg
: did 19 years with Macquarie Bank, the last nine as managing director before he took the top job at Boral, but failed to deliver in the short term although Origin Energy's success shows a better long-term record. Pocketed about $30 million from the disastrous Grange Securities hospital pass to Lehman Brothers and also spent five years with venture capital firm Gresham Partners.

Clive Berghofer: the former Toowoomba mayor and vociferous opponent of water recycling owns a couple of shopping centres and a substantial land bank. The BRW claimed $327 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $344 million in 2019.

Neville Bertalli: Melbourne-based car dealer. Was valued at $489 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $461 million in 2019.

Besen family: Marc Besen and John Gandel ran the Sportsgirl and Sussan retail business for 33 years. Now a billionaire famous for his sprawling retail property empire that includes a half share in Highpoint in Melbourne's northern suburbs. Formed the Besen foundation that has interests in health, art and culture. The Australian valued them at $2.508 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued them at $2.34 billion. The Australian valued at $2.51 billion in 2019

Mark Bethwaite
: a former Liberal Party federal treasurer and Australian Olympic Sailing Team member at three Olympics. He competed at Munich in 1972, Montreal in 1976 and Moscow in 1980. In 2007 he sold his Mosman mansion to Primary Healthcare founder, Ed Bateman, for a reported $13.5 million. This wealth was largely assembled from his time as an executive director of the old North Broken Hill.

John Beville: a major player in the Sydney retail property market. His family's fortune was based on a chain of jewelery shops developed by his father, Neville, in the 1970s. The BRW claimed $397 million in 2010.

Geoffrey Bible: after running Philip Morris Australia, he went on to become the CEO and chairman of their global operations. Was also a director of News Corporation for a decade until the 2004 move to Delaware in the US. This article suggests he's worth plenty.

Robert Biddle: popped up on the top 20 shareholder list of Skilled Group, a national workforce services company, with 5% or 5 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $6.20 when the stake was worth more than $30 million but then fell away before a merger with Programmed and a subsequent Japanese takeover of the combined group.

Andre Biet: co-founder and former managing director of the Charter Hall Properties Group who owned about 5.6 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $3.20 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $17 million before it fell away with the GFC.

Huang Bingwen and family: owners of manufacturing and printing businesses including Shantou Dongfern Printing, The AFR valued them at $2 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.02 billion in 2019

Alan Birchmore: former director of Mermaid Marine Australia who made more than $10 million from his stake in the company.

Bishop family: Brisbane-based owners of the Hardy Bros and Wallace Bishop jewelers, plus owns property in spades and plenty of other assets.

Bob Bishop: studied mathematical physics at the University of Adelaide and did his Masters in Science at New York University. Rose to be CEO of Silicon Graphics, before coming back to Australia.

Tim Bishop: Long-time Senior Macquarie Group banker. 2018/19 total pay of $12 million and also made many millions on his shareholding.

Graeme Bignell
:
been a director of an Adelaide-based car dealer for 20 years but also owned 956,299 shares in Brisbane-based car dealer AP Eagers. The stock peaked at almost $17.50 in January 2008 when this stake alone was worth $17 million.

Stephen Bizzell
: owned about 4.8 million shares in coal seam gas company Arrow Energy which Shell and Petrochina bought for $4.70 a share in 2010.

Paul Blackburne: owner, founder and Managing Director of Perth luxury apartment developer Blackburne. Was valued at $567 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $553 million in 2019.

Graeme Blackman
: former chairman of Melbourne-based pharmaceutical company IDT Australia who owned about 6 million shares when the stock peaked at $2.60 in December 2007 before taking a tumble.

Marcus Blackmore: family founded the Blackmores pharmacy chain and retains a stake worth more than $500 million. The Australian valued at $545 million in 2019.

Wolf Blass: Adelaide entrepreneur who made his fortune in wine and enjoyed a serious payday in the 1990s on selling out to Foster's.

Cate Blanchett: actress and co-artistic director of the Sydney Theatre Company who owns property in Australia and the UK. The BRW claims $48 million.

Len Bleasel
: after starting out as a humble plumber, the retired AGL CEO collected a very handy $11 million in 2001 when he departed before spending a few years as a professional director, including as the long-term chair of APA Group.

John Blewitt
: along with partner Tony Muston, collected $38 million in cash when they sold Retire Invest to ING in 1995. Blewitt has a house in Mosman and a home in Belgravia, London.

Barry and Norman Bloom: with their parents beginning retailing in Melbourne in 1946, the Bloom brothers continued the hard work, building and eventually selling Australia's most successful women's clothing chains, Portmans.

Natalie Bloom
: runs international company Bloom Cosmetics. It has standalone stores in Asia, to which Bloom Cosmetics exports 70% of products. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Brett Blundy
: the founder of the music and lingerie retailer, Brazin, which owns Sanity, Virgin and HMV music stores. He also controls the discount jewelery chain Diva. The AFR valued him at $1.42 billion in 2019.

Brian Blythe
: after years as the executive chairman of the diversified services company, Spotless Group, this Melbourne businessman sold his 13 million shares to private equity firm PEP in 2012 at $2.71 a pop.

Andrew Bogut: professional basketballer in the NBA. Originally from Melbourne, he moved to the US to play for the University of Utah as a teenager. In 2009 he signed a $60 million five-year contract extension.

Anthony Bohnenn: former chairman of Perth-based Grange Resources, who owned about 13 million shares worth $35 million when the stock peaked at $2.80 before the GFC.

John Bongiorno: prominent Melbourne real estate agent who in 2020 sold his Brighton home for $19.8 million through a rival agency.

Nicholas Bolton: this Melbourne-based internet entrepreneur and university dropout, who made his first million by his 21st birthday, has gained a name for himself as 'greenmailer' after the Brisconnections debacle, yet he continues to grow his wealth.

Sam Bombardier
: an Italian Australian who by the 1980s had amassed a property portfolio of 135 commercial buildings and about 150 residential homes in Melbourne and Sydney, all of which he owned outright. These days he owns a large part of Brookvale, one of the main secondary industrial areas of Sydney. He lives in Beacon Hill.


Damien Bombelli: former JP Morgan commodities trader turned hedge fund manager who in 2020 The AFR reported was trying to sell his Manly “holiday house” for $17 million.

Sebastian Bonaccorso: one of Sydney's leading real estate agents and auctioneers who has made plenty clipping the ticket and playing the property game himself.

Alan Bond's family:
infamous WA businessman who after a stint in jail, has again grown his wealth substantially, through property and African mining interests. BRW claimed $265 million before the GFC.

Eileen Bond
: known as 'big red', the former wife of disgraced Alan Bond is living in an 108 year-old mansion in Perth's exclusive Peppermint Grove. With a couple of cottages in England and a property in Sydney, combined with an impressive private art collection that would not be out of place in any gallery, her wealth is well above $20 million, much to the chagrin of former Bond Corp shareholders.

Peter Bond
: former managing director of Linc Energy had a share wealth of more than $500 million at the top but many critics doubted the slick marketing and spruiking around its coal and gas operations which eventually flopped. The BRW claimed $352 million at one point.

Shaun Bonett
: owns a variety of sites Australia-wide with his property development company, Precision Group. While most of his fortune comes from here, Bonett also co-owns Lenders Direct and invests in the information technology and biotechnology sectors. The BRW claimed $340 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.17 billion in 2019.

Chris Bonwick: geologist and former managing director of gold and nickel miner Independence Group who owned about 3.3 million shares when the stock peaked at $9.20 before the GFC.

Martyn Booth: the former operations boss of MAP Group (now Sydney Airport) who owned about 3.6 million shares in the company on top of his huge salary from the old Macquarie Group before MAP went independent. Sydney Airport shares were at almost $9 in early 2020.

Booth family: used to be loyal servants of pokies billionaire Bruce Mathieson then got independently wealthy running a couple of large pokies venues in Victoria for themselves.

Angelo del Borrello: former managing director of the Aspen Group, a national property investment and management group who owned 26 million shares when the stock peaked at $2.90 before taking a tumble during the GFC.

John Borshoff: the former Paladin Energy CEO was worth more than $200 million on paper when the stock peaked at $10.80 but it has been all down hill in recent year so his wealth depends on how many he sold off.

Luke Bortoli: spent two years as CFO of Afterpay after coming across from Aristocrat Leisure and made about $60 million on his options, as The AFR's Rear Window columnist Joe Aston reported when he resigned in September 2020.

Wayne Bos: the former Telstra executive considered a guru of the internet economy and in particular, Sausage Software, although has largely disappeared these days. Sold enough before the dot com bust to remain a wealthy man.

Tim Bosher: of Palm Beach in Sydney was the largest shareholder and director of CITECT which was sold to Schneider Electrics Australia. He was also on the board of Pan Bio, Crescent Capital, Surfing Hardware and SHI Holdings and is worth more than $20 million.

Jim Bosnjak: made his fortune through private bus company Westbus and then set a record when he sold two apartments at The Toaster overlooking the Sydney Opera House for $13 million.

Peter Botten: the Sydney-based CEO of PNG-registered Oilsearch has been earning good dollars for 26 years since taking the top job in 1993. Current shareholding exceeds $10 million and salary has topped $20 million over the years.

Mark Bouris
: Sydney based, the founder of Wizard Home Loans has expanded this company into Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America, and sold his founding stake to GE Money, which ended up losing almost $400 million selling out to Aussie Home Loans. The BRW claimed $269 million in 2010.

Steve Bowden: a former Newtown rugby league player who ventured into the hotel business has performed extremely well. He sold the Hurtzville Ritz Hotel in January 2007 at the height of boom of pub values for a then-record $52 million to Melbourne-based Aussie Leisure Group.

Nick Bowen: ousted managing director of mining contractor MacMahon Holdings who owned 14m shares when the stock peaked at almost $1.90 when he was worth more than $25 million but the stock then tanked back below 50c after a profit warning in 2012.

Terry Bowen: former finance director of Wesfarmers who made more than $20 million from his long stint at the company and now sits on various boards.

Vaughan Bowen: co-founder and former managing director of M2 Telecommunications who was also chair of Vocus for a period before handing over to Bob Mansfield.

Bowness family: committed up to $5 million to a campaign to raise $150 million for art acquisitions for the National Gallery of Victoria to help celebrate 150 years in 2011.

Brian Boyd: managing director of Sydney property developer Payce Consolidated who owned 14m shares worth almost $50 million when the stock peaked at $3.45 in July 2007 before taking a tumble.

Michael Boyd: founder of Sonic Healthcare, he has turned his $4 million investment into a shareholding worth more than $300 million.The BRW claimed $360 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $669 million in 2019.

Geoff Brady: the veteran Melbourne car dealer owned about 3.6m shares in Carsales at one point in addition to the value of his network of dealerships.

Tony Brady: Irish migrant and founder of the Brady Group, a prolific Melbourne-based high-rise property developer who has built a cluster of towers in the Little Lonsdale St precinct.

Robert Branchi: former director of the delisted Advanced Healthcare Group who owned 17.6m shares which were worth $77m when the stock peaked at around $4.40.

John Brand: established by his father, he runs Brisbane-based Rocklea Spinning Mills which is the largest spinner of cotton in Australia. He also owns a substantial property portfolio which was partly inherited.

Phillip Brass: the former Pacific Dunlop chief made a tidy profit from the sale of his Toorak mansion in Melbourne. The sale makes the mansion, named Miegunyah, Melbourne's most expensive house. He purchased the property for a reported $2 million in 1991 from Robert Holmes à Court and sold for $20 million to an undisclosed buyer in November 2009.

Ben Brazil: long time investment banker for Macquarie and former Crown Resorts director who led the unsuccessful takeover in 2005 of the London Stock Exchange and purchased a $16.5 million mansion in Sydney's exclusive Vaucluse.


Lyn Brazil: a well-known rural investor in Queensland whose biggest pay day was backing wotif.com. Sold 16.6 million shares for $33.2 million into the 2005 float and retained about 10 million shares which were later sold given the business was taken over.


Howard Brenchley: the property trust researcher and commentator became a player when he joined the board of Melbourne-based APN Property Group in 1998. He owns about 12.6m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3.90 when he was worth more than $50 million, but then later crashed.

Joe and Gerda Brender: the co-founders of retail chaim Katies with Sam Moss who agreed to sell their half share in a $95 million Point Piper residential complex in 2020.


Peter Brennan
: the former finance director of Fantastic Furniture who owned 10.5m shares. The stock peaked at around $4.60 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $45 million.

Andrew Brice: an original investor in wotif.com, who made so much that he once generously pledged $12 million worth of shares to the University of Queensland.

Robert Brice: one of the original backers of wotif.com who sold 6.8 million shares into the 2005 float for $13.6 million. He owned about 40m shares after the float worth more than $200 million.

Daniel Brickman: a former Babcock & Brown executive who owned shares worth more than $10 million and pocketed big cash bonuses over the years before the business collapsed.

Paul Bridgwood: former director of Perth-based Liquefied Natural Gas, who owned 13m shares when the stock peaked at $1.25 in June 2008 when the stake was worth more than $15 million.

Ron Brierley: veteran corporate raider who in 2019 was arrested for possessing child pornography.

Alan Brierty: managing director of WA-based Brierty, who owned 19m shares worth $28 million when the stock peaked at $1.80.

Tom Brinkworth: Rural land owner including Watervalley Station. Was valued at $362 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $367 million in 2019.

Judith Brinsmead: The Australian valued at $544 million in 2019.

Amanda & David Briskin: started accessories business Mimco, which was sold to Gresham Private Equity for $45 million. The company grew by creating a high quality brand, sold in boutiques and in David Jones stores nationwide. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Symon Drake-Brockman:
former director of Nexus who owned 70m shares or 7.3%. Was formerly CEO of RBS Global Banking and Markets in the Americas before the business was nationalised after the GFC.

Michael Brogan: has made plenty as a senior executive of the FirstRand Group and chairman of RMB Private Equity.

Bernie Brookes
: the former Woolworths supermarkets boss turned Myer CEO has made more than $20 million out of these two retail plays, although Myer ended badly.

Mike Cannon-Brookes: co-founder of software development company Atlassian who is now worth close to $10 billion. The Australian valued at $9.01 billion in 2019

Malcolm Broomhead: the former Orica CEO picked up 2 million shares at $4.50 a pop when he joined but has made plenty during other gigs as CEO of North and chairman of Asciano.

Brown family: one of the biggest family-owned wineries remains Brown Brothers in Victoria, which industry experts estimate is worth more than $50 million.

Alex Brown: former managing director of Astron, a producer of zirconium chemicals and advanced materials, who owned 41.4m shares worth around $160 million when the stock peaked at $4.10 in January 2006.

Andrew and Roger Brown: of Melbourne-based ARB Corporation, Australia's largest manufacturer and distributor of 4x4 accessories, who owned about 21m shares going into the GFC. The stock bottomed at $2.70 in December 2008 but is now approaching $20 in 2020.

Simon Brown: owner of ResourceCo, a waste management business that has multiple joint ventures including with Veolia and Cleanaway. Macquarie is keen to float the business.

Todd Brown: founder of property developer Urban Construction, who did all that foreshore development at Glenelg in Adelaide, before moving on to Brisbane. Lives next door to Gina Rinehart in a $15m+ house on the Brisbane River.

Bruce and Lyndon Brown: sold a parcel of Wagyu cattle properties in the Eneabba region between Perth and Geraldton for more than $50 million a few years ago. Also made plenty from their Cygnet Bay pearling operations.

David Browne:
former executive chairman of embattled stockbroker Tolhurst which was taken over by the unlisted Patersons Securities. He made plenty from his membership of the ASX and is the major shareholder in the Scotchman Hill winery.

Toby Browne: Owns Pharmacare. The Australian valued at $635 million in 2019.

Garry Brown-Neaves: director and shareholder of Alcock Brown-Neaves Group (ABN Group) which operates a number of building companies in Perth and in 2008 purchased a majority stake in Victoria's Boutique Homes. Mr Brown-Neaves and his partner Dale Alcock amassed a fortune from WA's property market.

Peter Brown: former CEO and 25% shareholder in WA-based ISP provider Westnet, he and his father Colin Brown and his uncle Bernard Brown shared in the spoils of a recent sale to iiNet which raised $81 million in cash.

Anthony Crichton-Brown: the former chairman of insurance group Edward Lumley paid $9 million in 2010 for Toronga station near Hay.

Robert Maple-Brown: the founder of the funds management group Maple-Brown Abbott which has been a strong and consistent performer for Australian superannuation funds, has a share wealth upwards of $200 million. The BRW claimed $212 million in 2010.

Robert Brown: former deputy-chairman of Perth-based Cedar Woods Properties, who owned 10m shares when the stock peaked at $6 before the GFC.

Paul Brunner: former president and CEO of drilling services company Boart Longyear who made about $80 million from the Macquarie-led private equity play and then float on the ASX, which ended up costing investors several billion dollars.

Robert Bryan: the former chair of Queensland Gas owned 22.8m shares worth more than $120 million in the BG takeover, plus a further 28m shares in PanAust . In 2010 the BRW claimed $221 million.

Len Buckeridge's family: the deceased billionaire began in architecture designing low-cost housing across Perth with blocks of Buckeridge flats. He moved into manufacturing nearly 50 years ago, building up the BGC Group which makes everything it uses for building projects, excluding ceramic tiles and clay bricks. The 2010 BRW claimed $2.24 billion. Forbes valued at $US970m in March 2010. The AFR valued him at $1.88 billion in 2019. The Australian valued the inheritors of the fortune, Andrew and Sam Buckeridge at $1.54 billion in 2019

David Buckland: former executive director of Hunter Hall International who owned 930,000 shares or 3.64 %. The stock peaked at almost $18.50 in November 2007.

Pat Buckler: Gold Coast resident with significant holdings in residential and industrial property in south-east Queensland, plus a sizable share portfolio.

Andrew Buckley:
former managing director of Brisbane-based integrated professional services provider Cardno, who owned 2.4m shares. The stock peaked at almost $8 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $15 million, but then went badly south.

Ian Buddery: former executive chairman of eServGlobal, inventor of smart communication and payment solutions for telecommunications service providers, who owned about 15m shares when the stock peaked at $1.35 before the GFC.

Vaughan Bullivant: collected $135 million when his Nature's Own vitamin empire was sold to FH Faulding in 1999, but then ploughed $72 million into Daydream Island which has proved a difficult investment.

Greg Bundy:
former head of Merrill Lynch Asia Pacific sold his Mosman House for $8 million in 2004.

Stirling Buntine: owner of large cattle properties in NT and WA worth upward of $300 million. The BRW claimed $338 million in 2010.

Burger family: arriving from Hungary in 1951, the family owns a substantial portfolio of commercial property in Sydney's CBD worth upwards of $300 million. The BRW claimed $342 million in 2010.

Tony Burgess: former managing director and global co-head of mergers and acquisitions at Deutsche Bank. The Melbourne University graduate and Harvard MBA was in charge of 300 people in 25 offices, after first going to London in 2004. Now back in Melbourne running the boutique Flagstaff Partners.

Graham Burke
: the long-serving and recently retired managing director of Village Roadshow owns about 14% of the company which is currently the subject of a $1 billion takeover bid by PEP.

Kim Burke: former head of equity markets at Macquarie Bank who pocketed a big salary for many years, plus made tens of millions on his shares.

Andrew Burnes: the CEO of travel company Helloworld was able to write out a $5 million cheque to partially participate in the company's $50 million capital raising in 2020, although his stake was diluted by 3.2 per cent to 28.15 per cent but he remains the largest shareholder.

Burnett family: Queensland cattle family which owned 5% of the original consortium which bought Stanbroke Pastoral from AMP on the cheap for just $490 million and then parlayed some of those profits back into the purchase of the Frankfield property for $40 million.

Alexander Burns: managing director of Sphere Minerals who owned 7 million shares worth about $15 million as Xstrata and the Chinese battled it out for control of the emerging African iron-ore producer a few years back.

Burgess sisters: the furniture maker and businessman Ernest Henry Leonard Burgess bought the bulk of an 1121-hectare property north of Melbourne in 1979 for about $920,000 and his two daughters stand to collect up to $300 million out of a long term progressive sale to developer Stockland struck in late 2010. See The Age's coverage.

Tim Burroughs: veteran investment banker who has advised on more than 100 public company acquisitions and chaired investment banking operations at Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch in Australia, as well as being a principle in the boutique adviser Centaurus Corporate Finance in the 1990s.

Mark Burrows
: a prominent investment banker and professional director for more than 20 years whose $10 million-plus personal fee when selling Fairfax in 1991 got him well up the rankings. Was kicked off the Fairfax board in 2008 after advising Lachlan Murdoch on his aborted bid for James Packer's Consolidated Media Holdings.

Matthew Burrows: former CEO of the Denison Group.

Peter Burrows: career stockbroker who made plenty as an executive director of Bell Financial Group, plus through his membership of the ASX when it demutualised in 1998.

Craig Burton: former executive director Mirabela Nickel who owned 6m shares worth $45 million when the stock peaked at $7.90 before heading south.

Joseph Butta: of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009 when he owned 9m shares. He benefited greatly from the sale and in 2010 the BRW valued him at $153 million.

Otto Buttula: made his fortune selling Investorweb to the Commonwealth Bank.

Andrew Buxton:
established the property development company MAB Corporation that has annual sales of over $300 million, of which he is managing director. Since its formation in 1995, the group has built more than $11 billion worth of property. The Australian valued at $870 million in 2019, along with his brother Michael Buxton

Michael Buxton: co-founded property developer Becton and has also established the property development company MAB Corporation. A big collector of contemporary art. Since its formation in 1995, the group has built more than $11 billion worth of property. The Australian valued at $870 million in 2019, along with his brother Andrew Buxton

Rhonda Byrne: producer of the hugely successful book and CD The Secret which generated sales of more than $300 million.

Terence Byrt: former non-executive chairman of Perth-based East Energy Resources, who owned 30m shares worth $23 million when the stock peaked at 78c in January 2008.

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C 25

Tim Cahill: one of Australia's best football exports who has amassed a pile worth more than $30 million over the journey.

Alberto Calderon: CEO of Orica since 2015 and also made plenty from his earlier long stint with BHP. Bought $3.5 million worth of Orica shares shortly after releasing the 2018-19 results.

Mark Calderwood: former CEO of Perseus Mining whose stake was worth more than $10 million in late 2010.

Hugh Callaghan: the former Rio Tinto and Xstrata executive is best known as the founder of Riversdale Mining who quit to pursue other interests before the African coal miner really took off but still pocketed almost $10 million from the sale of his 4.5m shares. Later took on Tamaya Resources which was expanding its Chilean nickel interests before collapsing in 2008 when the resources bubble burst.

Joe Catalfamo: founder and former owner of Tasman Market Fresh Meats. Was valued at $415 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $393 million in 2019.

Calvert-Jones family: John Calvert-Jones was a stockbroker with Prudential Bache who became honourary Treasurer of the Federal Liberal Party. He married Janet, one of Rupert Murdoch's three sisters, whose wealth grew from the $600 million Rupert paid out to his sisters in the 1990s. They hold an extensive share and property portfolio. The BRW claimed $355 million in 2010.

Jan Cameron
: the founder of adventure retail chain, Kathmandu, which grew from an apartment to 46 stores in three countries which was eventually sold earning her a figure north of $400 million. She also holds a large stake in NZ-based children's clothing company, Pumpkin Patch, plus made plenty out of Bellamy's. The BRW claimed $505 million in 2010.

Robert Cameron: former managing director of Centennial Coal who owned about 6.7m shares worth $40 million when the stock peaked at almost $6.30 in July 2008.

Wallace Cameron: Bruce Mathieson's former controversial offsider made a fortune through the Gribbles pathology business, such that he was able to splash out about $8 million buying the Foster's executive retreat at Mt Macedon. Had a brush with ASIC over his share structuring.

Allan Campbell
: former chairman and CEO of AJ Lucas Group, an infrastructure specialist, who owned about 10m shares. The stock peaked at almost $7 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $70 million, but it has struggled ever since.

Grahame Campbell: former engineering executive who was a non-executive director of Worley Parsons who owned 504,579 shares. The stock peaked at almost $53 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $26 million.

Peter Campbell: founder of the house building company Clarendon Homes, which later changed to CPG Australia. Sold for shares in the Investa Property Group, which he quickly converted into cash on the market.

Peter Campbell: education industry veteran who was a non-executive director of listed education provider Navitas, formerly known as IBT Education. He owned about 20m shares at the peak and in 2019 the stock was taken over over in a bid worth $5.82 a share.

Terry Campbell: the retired JB Were chief executive is worth more than $50 million after many years on a big package and then the lucrative Goldman Sachs takeover.

Troy Campbell: part of Australia's largest privately-owned oil and gas services company, Easternwell Group which his father established. As an example of its size, it secured a $100 million contract with Santos to build and operate drilling rigs in 2007.

Mike Cannon-Brookes: The Australian valued the Atlassian co-founder at $9.010 billion in 2019.

Kim Cannon:
founded one of Australia's leading alternative lenders of home mortgages to traditional financial institutions, FirstMac, as a mortgage manager. For over 40 years the business grew substantially and he even made news with his bid to become a one man bank - see AFR story from 2017.

Bill Caralis: owner and operator of the 2SM Supernetwork, spanning 40 stations which is the largest independently owned commercial radio network in NSW and South East Queensland. In 2010 the BRW claimed $110 million.

Michael Carapiet
: former head of corporate finance at Macquarie Bank who made more than $15 million a year and succeeded Nicholas Moore as head of Macquarie Capital. Invests privately with Moore in lots of ventures. He owned shares with Macquarie that were worth more than $30 million in March 2010. If retained, these would be worth more than $100 million today.

Michael Caratti: former chairman of listed company Lycopodium whose shares were worth more than $30 million in March 2010.

Mark Carnegie: reportedly pocketed $88 million from the sale of boutique corporate adviser and private equity firm Carnegie Wylie to Lazard but has also made plenty investing where John Singleton plays around over the years, including in various pubs and Macquarie Radio.

Declan Carnes:
owner-manager of one of the top performing branches of the Bank of Queensland who went on $10 million buying spree racking up luxury real estate, industrial land and residential property for development.

Carney family: owned The Block Arcade in Collins Street along with other property interests. John Carney was a lawyer who died shortly before The Block was sold for more than $100 million to the Cohen family in 2015.

Frank Carr: former director of Carrick Gold who owned 54m shares when the stock peaked at more than $2 in December 2007 before the GFC hit.

James Carver: founder of Mermaid Marine Australia who owned 7m shares in 2010 when the stock was trading around $2.60. Hasn't done as well since.

Casella family: focussed mainly on exporting wines to the American market, the family business was founded by Fillipo and Maria Casella with the aim of producing cheap bulk wine. The growth of Casella wine has been a great export success story. The BRW claimed $652 million in 2010. The Australian valued them at $1.694 billion in 2019 whilst The AFR said $1.57 billion. The Australian valued at $1.69 billion in 2019

Salim Cassim : pops up on a range of WA mining company top 20 shareholder lists such as Grange Resources and Riversdale Mining, which alone delivered him more than $10 million when Rio Tinto took it over for $16.50 a share in 2011.

Sam Castello: former tow-truck driver who is now worth more than $200 million thanks to being one of the largest pokies pub operators in Victoria.

Castricum family: Jack and his brothers are large and successful meat exporters.

Antony Catalano: made his fortune competing against Fairfax in glossy weekly suburban newspapers and then selling it back to them before later becoming CEO of Domain and now joint proprietor of Australian Community Newspapers after teaming up with Alex Waislitz to buy Fairfax's regional newspapers.

Giuseppe Catalfamo: the controversial owner of Tasman Meats, the biggest meat supplier to Coles, flogged control of his empire to a big Brazilian company in 2008 after the controversy of kick-backs to the retailer's former supermarkets boss Peter Scott. The BRW claimed $230 million in 2010.

Catelan family: Ray, Dennis, Leanne, Michelle all made plenty when the property stats business RP Data went public.

Chris Catlow
: the former Fortescue Metals finance director who owned about 8m shares which, if retained, would be worth more than $100 million.

Lyndsey Cattermole: the co-founder of Aspect Computing which finished up in the belly of Telstra through Kaz Computing but delivered more than $50 million to the entrepreneur who has spent the past 15 years as a professional director at the likes of Foster's, Treasury Wine Estates and Myer.

Chan family
: focused on property in Sydney, the Chans own some of Sydney's busiest shopping centres. Interests in Sydney hotels and other property developments add to the family's fortune estimated to be more than $200 million. The BRW claimed $220 million in 2010.

Kar Wai Chan and Thomas Tiong
: making their name with the turn around of the Brisbane Myer Centre, but also as frustrated mango farmers who have since sold out.

Bruce Chalmers: wine-maker and former owner of Chalmers Vineyards in NSW, his winery expanded from 8ha to 650ha, leading to the circa $50m sale to Macquarie Group a few years ago.

John Chan: managing director of the Perth-based property developer Finbar Group, who owned about 19m shares. The stock bottomed at 45c in December 2008 before recovering back above $1.

Michael Chaney: the former CEO of Wesfarmers amassed a fortune in excess of $30 million from his long stint running the company before becoming a professional director earning more than $1 million a year as chair of the likes of NAB and Woodside.

George Chapman
: owner of the Skyrail rain forest cable way and the Harbour Lights apartment building in Sydney, who subsequently acquired a stake in the Greyhound bus company.

Jeff Chapman: owner of the property development group the Bennelong Group, which sold a majority stake in the listed healthclub business, Crown Sports. The BRW claimed $500 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $839 million in 2019.

Paul Chapman: former chairman of ASX300 gold producing and exploration company Silver Lake Resources which operates in Western Australia's Mount Monger and Murchison regions. Held a stake worth more than $10 million in late 2010.

Neil Chatfield: former finance director of Toll Holdings who pocketed more than $20 million from his time with the business before becoming a professional director earning more than $1 million a year from the likes of Transurban, Costa, Virgin Australia and Aristocrat.

Daniel Chen: heavily involved in the textile industry, his property development has been just as successful.

Jina Chen and Alex Wu: The couple are the founders and precious owners of vitamin company, Nature Care and still maintain a small share of the group. The Australian valued at $899 million in 2019

Bob Cheng: owned 60% of his company EmailCash, an email marketing business. He has branched out internationally to New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Taiwan. Cheng was also the second largest shareholder in Tel.Pacific. Made BRW Young Rich List in 2010.

Christopher Cheung: has owned Sydney's Coogee Bay Hotel for 20 years and those 12,000 visitors every weekend have generated enough cash for a major retail and residential development on the site.

Sam Chong: Quietly become one of the Australian coal super powers. The Australian valued at $1.22 billion in 2019

Lucy Christian: popped up on the Elders top 20 shareholder list with around 7.2m shares after the GFC. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in June 2007 when she was worth more than $20 million but then struggled for a few years before coming back nicely in recent years.

Ray Christie
: a large grain farmer from Toobeah in Queensland who had a solid holding of AWB shares before it was taken over.

Sam Chisholm's family: the late media executive made his serious money as CEO of BSkyB but still enjoyed $2 million from PBL in 2005-06 and a termination benefit of $1 million in 2006-07. Daughter Caroline Jumpertz moved to sell the family's $20m-plus Palm Beach mansion in early 2020.

Church family: Fred Church was the founder of listed investment company Milton who passed away in 1995 after serving 57 years on the board. The family had a large shareholding in the company and the last connection was John Church who retired from the board in 2017. Milton publishes this very helpful full history of director service since the 1938 IPO.

Reg Clairs
: the former Woolworths CEO was replaced by Roger Corbett in 1998, but if he retained his shareholding it would be worth north of $20 million today. Spent a few years as a professional director including boards such as CBA and David Jones.

Mark Clark: former CEO of Regis Resources whose stake was worth more than $10 million in late 2010.

Chris Clarke: based in the US and a former advertising industry guru, he founded and sold his Australian advertising agency, Pure Creative in 2000. He then began a global advertising agency called Nitro which was bought out by Sapient, and from this sale he pocketed a handy $US42.5 million.

David Clarke: former largest shareholder and director in Stuart Petroleum who owned around 14.6m shares in 2010. The stock peaked at almost $2 in May 2006 when he was worth more than $20 million.

Clarke family: the Macquaire Bank co-founder David Clarke died in 2010 after a stellar career with the millionaire's factory which left his family with net assets of more than $50 million.

Simon Clausen: an information technology entrepreneur his company PC Tools, which manufactures anti-spyware software, was sold in August 2008 to US-based Symantec for around $170 million. The BRW claimed $391 million in 2015.

Alastair Clayton: a geologist and non-executive director of
Bannerman Resources, an iron-ore wannabe in the Pilbara, who owned about 5m shares in 2010. The stock peaked at almost $4 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $20 million, before weakening.

Peter Clemenger: the advertising guru donated up to $5 million to a campaign to raise $150 million for art acquisitions for the National Gallery of Victoria to help celebrate 150 years in 2011, so is clearly worth plenty.

Andrew Clifford: co-founder of Platinum Asset Management, who owned about 32.8m shares after the float which were worth close to $200 million.

Leigh Clifford: the former CEO of Rio Tinto collected $4 million in 2006 and $7.5 million in 2007, when he retired from the mining giant, plus has made more than $10 million on his shareholding. Also served on boards such as Barclays and chaired Qantas for several years,

Robert Clifford: founder and chairman of Incat, manufacturer of high speed catamaran ferries in Tasmania, who began building boats for his fisherman father.

William Clinton: made a lot of money from coal mines in the Hunter region many years ago. "Old Bill" Clinton handed over to his son "Young Bill" who ran the family farm near Grafton. The Clinton family's business interests also extend to the Clinton Toyota Group based in Lakemba.

Paul Clitheroe: the former Channel Nine finance guy made his fortune when AXA paid a big price for his IPAC advisory business, which boomed during Channel Nine's Money show in the 1990s.

John Cloney:
was the long-serving QBE chairman who formed a mighty partnership with CEO Frank O'Halloran over a 30 year period. He owned about 635,000 shares, so when the stock peaked at almost $35 in October 2007, these were worth about $20 million, although it has struggled in recent years.

Bill Clough: former non-executive chairman of Mirabela Nickel which developed the Santa Rita nickel mine in Brazil that commenced production in 2009. He owned about 8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $7.90 in June 2008 when this stake was worth around $63 million.

Harold Clough: founder of the Perth construction and engineering company, Clough Limited. A prominent donor to conservative causes in WA and beyond.

Pierce Cody: the man who ran Cody Outdoor advertising before it was sold to APN News & Media has all the trappings with a Point Piper mansion and a lovely farm, although one of his more recent businesses, Macro Foods, struggled to make an impact and was eventually sold to Woolworths.

Coe Family: inherited from the late David Coe, co-founder of the Allco Finance Group which collapsed in late 2008. He owned 21.25 million Allco shares that peaked in value at $327.6m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Vaucluse home was valued at $40 million.

Greg Coffey: with earnings of $US600 million in 2007, he managed to generate a 50% return on investment for the $5 billion hedge fund he controlled for London-based GLG Partners, before leaving to set up his own fund. Beginning his career at the Macquarie Group after leaving university, he left Macquarie to rise to the top of his game and become Australia's youngest billionaire. Later joined hedge fund, Moore Capital, where he reportedly earned between $100-$150 million a year. The BRW claimed $335 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $457 million in 2019.

Gary Cohen
: former CEO of healthcare software provider iSOFT which was acquired by IBA Health Group in October 2007. In 2010 the BRW claimed $139 million.

Cohen family: made their fortune in vacuum cleaners and later bought the Block Arcade in Melbourne for more than $100 million in 2014 from the Carney family.

Julius Coleman: the Melbourne lawyer who founded property syndicate manager MCS which Centro bought for $193.5 million in 2003.

Toni Collette: Academy Award-nominated actress best known her for role in The Sixth Sense.

Anthony Collick: the successful Sydney-based currency trader paid $16.5 million for Michael Kirby's former Rose Bay home in early 2020.

Spero Conias: built up the Conias Residential real estate agency in Brisbane but also owns a property portfolio which includes some nightclubs and retail stores.

Gary Connell: successful Kalgoorlie businessman who owned a major fuel distribution business affiliated with BP and sat on the board of mining services company Ausdrill where he owned about 8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $2.90 in June 2007 when this stake alone was worth more than $25 million.

Ian Constable: the co-founder of Perth-based Q-V is professor of ophthalmology at the University of WA and amassed a fortune worth about $50 million developing products for use in eye-surgery.

Murray Cook: founding member of the world famous The Wiggles, most of the wealth is generated from touring and dancing with children globally, which regularly earned the group almost $50 million a year in revenue.

Noel Cook: a large grain farmer from Meandarra in Queensland who had a solid holding of AWB shares before the company was taken over.

Alasdair Cooke: former executive director of Albidon, an Africa-focussed exploration and development company with an emphasis on nickel, who owns about 5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $5.10 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $27 million before later tumbling.

Peter Cook: former executive director of Metals X, a diversified group exploring and developing minerals and metals, owns about 67m shares or 6.01%. The stock peaked at almost 47c in June 2007 when he was worth more than $33 million.

Robert Cooke: the former Symbion Health CEO reportedly pocketed $14 million when Affinity Health was traded by a private equity consortium and would have pocketed another $10 million from the Healthscope merger before it was blocked by Primary Healthcare, which sent him packing with a much smaller payout.

Michael Coombes: former divisional director at Macquarie Group who owns a large parcel of oceanfront land at Mona Vale in Sydney, along with investment properties in Japan.

Jim Cooney: sold his wireless telecommunications business TCI to Service Stream for $45 million in 2006.

David Cooper: now enjoying semi-retirement after a 30-plus year stint as a leading real estate salesperson in the Illawara region of NSW through his business Dougmal Property Management which his daughters now independently manage.

Peter Cooper: Chairman and founder of Cooper Investors in 2001. Was valued at $496 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $515 million in 2019.

Michael Coote
: founder and managing director of Coote Industrial, providers of multi-discipline engineering, maintenance, fabrication, personnel and logistical services, who owned 42m shares in August 2007 when the stock peaked at more than $3 before later crashing.

Michael Coppel: a successful music promoter for the past 30 years.

Mitch Corn: leader of the development company Beville Corp which in 2010 re-opened the huge Top Ryde shopping centre complex in John Howard's old seat of Bennelong.

John (Strop) Cornell:
famous for his role as 'Strop' on The Paul Hogan Show, made a fortune out of Crocodile Dundee and also became a successful hotelier. Married to Delvene Delaney, they sold the Beach Hotel in Byron Bay in 2007 for a reported $65 million.

Philip Cornish: after selling his telecommunications company Mobile Communications to Vodafone these days he manages a large share and property portfolio. The BRW claimed $205 million in 2010.

Chris Corrigan: the union-buster made about $100 million building Patrick Stevedores before selling out to Toll Holdings after a hostile takeover battle.

Frank Costa and family: former president of the Geelong Football Club and fruit and vegetable wholesaling mogul through the now listed Costa Exchange Group. The BRW claimed $283 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $688 million in 2019.

Richard Cottee: former managing director of Queensland Gas who sold his 6.1m shares to Britain's BG Group in 2008 for $35 million. Formerly helped run Enron's European business and has been involved with a range of smaller Australian resource plays in recent years.

Alan Cowen: donated up to $5 million to a campaign to raise $150 million for art acquisitions for the National Gallery of Victoria to help celebrate 150 years in 2011, so must be worth plenty.

Jack Cowin: his company, Competitive Foods, own 245 Hungry Jack's stores, 46 franchises and over 50 KFC stores in WA and the Northern Territory. He also brought the Domino's Pizza franchise to Australia, which he floated in 2007. The Australian valued him at $2.901 billion in 2019.

Derek Cowlan: a former director of Aquila Resources who owned 9m shares or 4%. The stock peaked at almost $17 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $150 million. In 2010 the BRW claimed $115 million.

David Cox: a former senior executive of Mincom, he pocketed $16.3 million when the mining IT firm was bought out by US private equity house Francisco Partners in 2007.

Laurie Cox: the former senior Macquarie Bank executive in Melbourne is worth close to $100 million courtesy of profitable investments in everything from the Millionaires Factory, to Transurban and Smorgon Steel, the latter two which he also chaired.

Rowan Craigie: former CEO of Crown Resorts who was paid more than $20 million during his time at the company.

Crawford family: old Adelaide family who started the CMV Group in 1934, which is now a successful truck and car retailer across several states with brands including Toyota, Volvo, Lexus and Chrysler Jeep in the stable. In recent years it has diversified into various agricultural ventures. Annual turnover is more than $500 million.





Mark Creasy: known as Australia's most active private gold prospector and investor, he continues to ride the gold market after the original Bronzewing bonanza. The BRW claimed $284 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $791 million in 2019.

Carolyn Creswell: founder of Carmen's Fine Foods which she bought for $1000 dollars and grew to having revenues of almost $20 million a year.

Ross Cribb: the former NSW TAB chairman and TNT general manager sold Jay-R Thoroughbred Stud in NSW, which he established in 1970, to the Sunland Group for more than $14 million in 2004.

Neville Crichton: a former racing car driver, he added the Australian distribution rights of Korean car manufacturer KIA in 2000 to his company Ateco Holdings which already distributed Citroen and Alfa Romeo. The Australian valued at $396 million in 2019.

Dennis Criddle: the founder and former chairman of Decmil Group, formally Paladio Group, who owned 24m shares worth more than $30 million at the peak.

Cripps family: has the worldwide franchise for Velcro and is known to be exceedingly generous to Australian and international charities, donating most of its annual corporate earnings. The family owns about 90% of the stock, plus has numerous other investments.

Stephen Cook
: former head of cross-border leasing and asset finance at Macquarie Bank who amassed a pile north of $30 million from his time with the Millionaires Factory.

Phillip Chronican: former executive director of Westpac who made more than $20 million from his shares in the company and is now chairman of NAB.

George Crouch and family: founders of Angus beef company Waverly Station. The family was valued at $373 million by The AFR in 2019.

Russell Crowe: when you're getting $20-$30 million per movie, it doesn't take long to be worth plenty.

Chris Cuffe: collected that notorious $33 million farewell payout when he left the Commonwealth Bank in 2002 but did create a lot of value over the years for Colonial.

John Cunningham
: listed in the top 20 after the GFC as owning 960,000 shares in Fortescue Metals which if retained today are worth close to $15 million.

Neil Cunningham and Paola Toppi: the couple own a $6 million apartment in Potts Point and also run the legendary Machiavelli's restaurant in Sydney.

Charles Curran: he established his fortune by purchasing several television stations in the 1980s. His Capital Investment Group has interests in a television production house Screentime, sheep and horse studs, plus a winery. The BRW claimed $264 million in 2010.

David Curran: a former top CBA executive in the IT area who held a stake worth more than $5 million in the bank and also made plenty as a former partner in Accenture.

Nicholas Curtis: former executive chairman of "rare earth' miner Lynas Corporation who owned 30m shares worth $50 million when the stock peaked at around $1.60 in March 2008. Stock subsequently dived but has bounced back in recent years.

Stuart Cuthbert: former director of the VDM Group who owned 4m shares when the stock peaked at more than $3.10 in August 2007 before taking a tumble.

Andrew Cuthbertson: amazing research boss at CSL who owns 89,182 ordinary shares in early 2020 which were worth more than $20 million.

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Suzi Dafnis: co-founder of Pow Wow Events International, a publishing and events management company, which was sold in 2006. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Doug Daft: once an Australian school teacher, he began working at the Sydney office of Coca-Cola in 1969 and rose to be global CEO out of Atlanta. Also used to sit on the Wal-Mart board.

Dahlsen family
: originally owned about 20% of Southern Cross Broadcasting and, unlike the other founders, didn't sell until the Macquarie Media/Fairfax takeover in 2007. The $30 million-plus stake was spread across several family members, but chairman John Dahlsen was in the top 20 shareholders. Then you have the family's growing hardware and roof truss business across Victoria and NSW.

John Dalley:
a share market investor, he sold a property at Point Piper in Sydney, in 2008 for a reported $18.45 million.

Tony D'Aloisi and Ilana Atlas: a husband and wife power couple. He was CEO of law firm Mallesons and then became ASX CEO who was booted out with a $7.8 million payout and then went on to become chairman of ASIC and then chairman of Perpetual. She is a former Mallesons partners who is chair of Coca Cola Amatil and has sat on other boards including Westfield and ANZ.

Blanche D'Alpuget: inherited most of Bob Hawke's considerable fortune, much of it accumulated doing business in China, after the former PM passed away last year. Hawke's 3 children were each given $750,000 which became the subject of litigation from his daughter Rosslyn Dillon who was seeking a larger slice of what is thought to be a $20 million-plus pile before the case settled.

Danks family:
they owned about 3m shares in Danks Holdings Limited a leading hardware distributor in Australia in charge of the retail brands Home Timber & Hardware, Thrifty Link Hardware and Plants Plus Garden Centres. Reaped nearly $43 million from the takeover by Woolworths as part of its disastrous Masters joint venture.

Evelyn Danos: executive director of duty free company James Richardson Corporation which was founded by her wealthy father, David Mandie, who died in 2011.

Darling family: Scottish migrant John Darling made his fortune as a wheat grower in the 1850s who then invested heavily in BHP. This family has a history of sound investing, including owning 28% of boutique investment manager, the Caledonia Group. The BRW claimed $575 million in 2010.

David family: starting in food wholesaling out of Sydney, John David spent 60 years building his business, and then selling to South Africa's Metro Cash and Carry. Davids Holding and Davids distribution changed names to Metcash and IGA Distribution in May 2000. The BRW claimed $279 million in 2010.

Nicholas Davies: owned 4.8 million shares in Arrow Energy, one of Australia's leading producers of coal seam methane gas, before it was taken over by Shell and PetroChina for $3.3 billion in 2010 at a valuation of more than $4 a share.

Roger Davies: the richest man in the Australian music industry who has managed the likes of Cher, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Sade and Pink. His first big earner was Sherbert but Cher's never-ending farewell tour alone would have made him a wealthy man based on the usual 20% management fee.

Geoffrey Davis: former managing director of WA-based Medusa Mining, who owned 3.8m shares when the stock peaked at $8 in 2011 before taking a dive.

Leon Davis: former CEO of CRA in Australia who rose to lead the whole combined Rio Tinto show out of London. Now back in Australia where he had a successful five years as chairman of Westpac and enjoys a handsome Rio Tinto pension.

Les Davis: former CEO of ASX 300 gold producing and exploration company Silver Lake Resources which operates in Western Australia's Mount Monger and Murchison regions. Held a stake worth almost $15 million in 2012 and the stock has performed well lately.

Richard Davis:
the former CEO of death services company Invocare owned 1.3m shares. The stock peaked at $17.50 in 2018 but then crashed to around $11 in early 2019 after a profit warning.

Terry Davis: former highly decorated and successful CEO of Coca Cola Amatil who made more than $20 million from the company. Also made more than $10 million from his stake in the Cellarmaster business which Foster's bought.

Tony Davis: having acquired the Limbunya cattle station for $1 million in 1996, he has since added 20,000 cattle. Tony and his wife Pam also sold their large Northern Territory land holdings for more than $30 million a few years ago.

Trent Davis: founder of Queensland-based IT company NetBox Blue, it has steadily grown since inception which has pushed his wealth to more than $50 million.

Seumas Dawes: investment banker and Chairman of financial house Pepper. Owns plenty of property in Bronte. Was valued at $520 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $582 million in 2019.

Ray Dawson: a successful property developer over many years in Melbourne's eastern suburbs who started out in the Doncaster area.

Colin Day: former director and substantial shareholder in the debt chasing outfit Collection House.

Malcolm Day: this Perth-based playboy who fronted Adultshop.com, the first adult company to be listed on the ASX, was once worth more than $100 million. Since the spectacular crash of Adultshop.com - during the dot com boom it was worth around $600 million, he has turned property developer and is said to be still worth plenty.

David Deague: Melbourne property developer who came a cropper in the mid-1990s but has bounced back and in 2010 owned the Kings Business Park in Southgate which is thought to be worth about $100 million.

De Angelis Family: Sydney based hotelier. In 2019, the family bought the Ingleburn Hotel for $30 million.

De Bortoli family: founded by Italian immigrant, Vittorio, in 1928 near Griffith in NSW. The wine empire has steadily grown expanding into nearly 2500 hectares in the Yarra Valley and King Valley in Victoria.

Adrian de Bruin: founder of forestry company Auspine who collected $114 million from the sale of his 30.3 per cent stake to Gunns in 2007-08.

Robert De Crespigny: made about $100 million building and then selling Normandy Mining. Now lives in London.

David Deitz: executive director of Allegiance Mining who sold his shares into the Zinifex takeover for a tidy $14.9 million in cash.

John Delano: former chief executive of leasing company FlexiGroup, which listed in late 2006. He owned shares worth more than $14 million in March 2010 and the share price peaked at more than $4 in 2014 before taking a dive.

Gerald Delany: real estate agent to the rich, this prominent Toorak agent has been the managing director of Kay & Burton Real Estate since 1992, and has presided over thousands of multimillion dollar sales in both commercial and residential properties. He has grown the company from property management and home unit sales to becoming a major prestige residential real estate company.

Nic De Luca:
founder and Managing Director of Queensland property development specialists, De Luca Corporation.

Colin De Lutis: the Westco Jeans founder who owns CBD properties, is great mates with Eddie McGuire, bought the Bradmill denim mill in Melbourne and even tried to become a director of the Carlton Football Club.

Joe Demase: the CEO of ASX listed 5G Networks who sold 15% of his stake for $5.5 million in conjunction with a $30 million placement at $1.85 launched in September 2020.

Tony Denny: founder of AAA Auto. Was valued at $415 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $415 million in 2019.

Peter de Rauch: an entrepreneur who sold Eagle Lighting to a Swedish company for a reported $50 million in 2006 and in 2011 made a hostile tilt for the board of the North Melbourne AFL club. Seems to be an active Liberal Party member in Boroondara as he paid for attack flyers against Green and independent candidates in the 2020 council elections despite Boroondara being controlled by Liberal councillors.


Rob Deutsch: founder of one of the fastest growing fitness service businesses in the world, F45, who was valued at $305 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $406 million in 2019.

David Devine: the founder and former managing director of Brisbane-based property developer Devine Ltd who built a fortune of around $30 million, even though engineering behemoth Leighton (now CIMIC) unhappily took it over.

Ron Dewhurst: the former managing director of ANZ McCaughan made some serious millions running money in New York, then bought a Steve Vizard mansion in Toorak for more than $5 million in cash and then made another pile running IOOF for three years before taking up a global gig with Legg Mason and then returning to Australia as a professional director.

Caren DeWitt: co-founder of software company Webmethods which provides managerial support to non-profit organisations in the US.

Peter Diamond: former executive chairman of Perth-based stockbroker Euroz, who owned about 9 million shares worth more than $25 million when the stock peaked at $2.75 in November 2007 before taking a dive.

Phillip Di Bella: founder of Di Bella coffee, which supplies machines and maintains them in over 800 cafes Australia wide. Additionally he also sells retail coffee and is looking to expand into China.

Gordon Dickinson: successful UBS investment banker turned rural investor who even bought Malcolm Fraser's old property Raheen.

Di Giorgo family: Steve and Rita Di Giorgio purchased a 160ha bush block at Luncindale in South Australia when they arrived from Italy in the 1950s. Working on other farms during the day and then their own at night, this hard work ethos allowed Steve to begin a land-clearing business which has allowed their property to expand to around 9000h. The run a commercial sheep and cattle business and have a strong interest in wine with their Di Giorgio Family Wines winery in the Coonawarra region.

Shaun Di Gregorio: CEO of Frontier Digital Ventures (FDV) who owned around $50 million worth of shares in 2020. Once worked as an executive at REA Group and then set up IProperty, a Malaysian property portal formerly listed on the ASX which was sold to REA in 2015. He then set up FDV.

Jason Di Iulio: founded Finance Mutual Australia which is one of South Australia's biggest non-bank lenders and was responsible for co-ordinating the syndicate behind the funding for the highly successful Wolf Creek.

Adrian Di Marco
: founder of booming Brisbane-based Technology One, providers of business software solutions, who owns about 55m shares.

Nick Dimauro: owner of the Angaet Property Group he purchased Parabanks shopping centre for $87.5 million to add to the stable of other commercial properties across Australia. The Australian valued at $656 million in 2019.

Collette Dinnigan: her distinctive garments and designs has catapulted her to be one of the world's most recognised fashion labels.

Steve Di Petta
: a Shepparton-based flamboyant account with a substantial private and commercial property portfolio. His accounting firm has over 4500 clients and is behind discount supermarket brand Pantry direct.

Anthony Di Pietro: A Frankston boy who made his fortune in food and venues, then became a big wheel in soccer through Melbourne Victoria - see Wikipedia profile.

Robert Disbrow: owned about 5m shares in Perth-based Albidon,
The stock peaked at almost $5.20 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $25 million, and bottomed to a lowly 3.9c.

Pamela Ditchfield: appeared in the 2019 Qantas top 20 shareholder list as the largest individual retail shareholder after Alan Joyce with a holding of 1.69 million shares. Google produces no more information but presume she has a wider portfolio of holdings.

David Dix: former executive chairman of AED Oil, whose 48 million shares peaked at $11.50 in October 2007, valuing them at more than $500 million. Subsequently left the board in 2012 and the company later went broke.

Dixson family: own a large property portfolio and a valuable stake in the Soul Pattinson Group. BRW claimed $126 million a few years back.

Bruce Dixon:
the long-time Healthscope CEO who also made made plenty running Spotless and then set up his own hospitality business which is majority owned by KKR and bought the Coles pokies business in 2019.

Daryl and Alan Dixon: founded Dixon Advisory which merged with Evans & Partners and then floated in 2018, although this has been a disaster for investors, largely due to the Dixon side of the business, especially its New Jersey property fund. Alan Dixon quit the board in 2020.

Geoff Dixon: former CEO of Qantas whose pay topped $12 million in 2007-08, despite his regular moaning about union wage demands.

Hugh Dixson: this Sydney businessman's wealth is largely focused on shares. His family, after migrating from Scotland in the 1830s, built their wealth through tobacco farms which were later sold to Rothmans.

John Dickson: inherited over $40 million from his mother Jean and formed the Jean & Alfred Dickson Charitable foundation on behalf of his parents. His interests include large land holdings such as Brewarrina Station at Narrandera in rural NSW, and the family beach house at Mt Eliza sold for over $10 million.

Ross Dobinson: the former executive chairman of pharmaceutical company Acrux Ltd owned about 10 million shares when the stock peaked at more than $4 in 2012 but in early 2019 was back below 20c.

Ronald Dodge: sold his home in Toorak for $10 million and owns distributor of airport luggage Samsonite. Moreover, he owns Point Property Group, a chain of car washes, interests in theatre and extensive collection of modern art.

Jure and Ivan Domazet: The Australian valued at $560 million in 2019.

Cameron Donald: beginning as a teenager selling used cars he had worked on, he now owns the Donald Property Group.

Ken Done: one of Australia's foremost painters who fought the Commonwealth bank claiming his net worth would be $61.5 million but for their mismanagement.

Michael Doohan: the former motorcycle great manages the 500cc Honda motorcycle racing team and owns property in Queensland and Monaco.

Bryan Dorman: Founder of healthcare and age-care service Regis and investment company Dorman Capital. Was valued at $391 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $410 million in 2019.

Hamish Douglass: made plenty as the former boss of Deutsche Bank in Australia but then got seriously rich founding and building Magellan Financial Group. The Australian valued at $786 million in 2019.

Andrew Downe: former head of treasury and commodities at Macquarie Bank who earned more than $10 million in multiple years.

Siobhan Downe: the former wife of long time Macquarie heavyweight Andrew Downe sold her Balmoral Slopes residence in Sydney for $18 million to VGI chairman Rob Luciano in 2019-20, according to press reports.

Craig Doyle: managing director of the Doyle Group. Residential and industrial property development grew his wealth after selling out of the livestock trucking business he initially established. The BRW claimed $270 million in 2010.

Kevin Doyle: former Vivendi Water chairman sold his two-hectare resort-style mansion at Terrey Hills, in early 2010, for $9 million to Westpac CEO Gail Kelly. He purchased the property for $3.65 million in 2005.

Roger Drake: founder of online grocer Drakes Supermarkets. Was valued at $454 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $407 million in 2019.

Peter Draney: the co-founder of Aspect Computing who collected more than $50 million when the business was sold to Kaz Computing in 2002.

Craig Drummond: rose from banking analyst to research director to managing director of JB Were and was still running the show after the merger with Goldman Sachs, earning at least $5 million a year whilst also being the largest individual Australian shareholder in the partnership following the departure of Terry Campbell. These days is CEO of Medibank Private after an earlier executive stint at NAB.

David and Paul Duchen: this father and son team have ridden the generic pharmaceuticals boom with the establishment of Arrow Pharmaceuticals, which later merged with Sigma.

Rod Duke: The Australian valued at $628 million in 2019.

Travers Duncan: former chairman of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company which was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009. He benefited greatly from the sale and in 2010 the BRW claimed he was worth $153 million. Also tied up with Eddie Obeid coal scandals in NSW. The Australian valued at $700 million in 2019.

Dunsdon family: collected $17m from the Federal Government from one of those controversial Murray Darling water buybacks.

Ian Dunstan: former CEO of Bravura Solutions, a leading global supplier of financial software, who made tens of millions from his stake in the company.

Dyer family: the descendants of Nick and Tony Dyer have collectively owned the licence to manufacturer Sealy mattresses and house brand bedding in Australia for more than 60 years. The family owns all Sealy manufacturing plant and equipment and buildings in most Australian states as well as extensive property holdings in Brisbane. Now also have the licence in China.

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Trevor Eastwood: joined Wesfarmers in 1963 and rose to be managing director for eight years until 1992. Rejoined the board in 1994 and was chairman from 2002 until 2007, when he retired with 878,694 shares worth more than $30 million if retained today.

Steven Eckowitz: an investor in Everest Babcock & Brown, he sold his home in the ritzy eastern suburbs of Sydney for a reported $20 million.

Rod Eddington: former CEO of Cathay Pacific and Ansett who then spent five successful years as CEO of British Airways. Returned to Australia as a professional director at the end of 2005 sitting on boards such as News Corp, Rio Tinto and Allco Finance Group boards, chairing JP Morgan's Australasian operation. Still on the Murdoch payroll as chairman of HWT in Melbourne.

Kim Edwards: spent 10 years as managing director of Transurban which delivered more than $20 million. Was paid $16.5 million in his final year and left with shares worth more than $10 million, which has significantly gone up in value if retained.

Alan Eggers: appears on the Silex Systems register with a handy 10.86m shares. The stock peaked at almost $13 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $100 million, bottomed at $2.90 in November 2008 and then recovered.

Anthony Eisen: CEO of Afterpay who had a stake worth more than $1 billion in mid-2020 and has taken out around $235 million from earlier share sales.

Bob Ell: Sydney property developer. The 2010 BRW claimed $1.1 billion. The Australian valued him at $1.864 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued him at $1.84 billion.

Tracey Ellery: co-founder of internet search engine LookSmart who, along with former husband Evan Thornley, were briefly paper billionaires before the dotcom crash.

Herb Elliott: the Olympic champion made about $30 million on his shares that came with the chairmanship of emerging iron-ore powerhouse Fortescue Metals, although the Opes Prime collapse cost him part of this.

John Ellice-Flint: at the peak, the ousted Santos CEO owned shares worth more than $50 million courtesy of a lucrative options play which was not originally put to shareholders.

Stewart Elliot: former executive chairman of Energy World Corporation who owned 724m shares. The stock peaked at $1.40 in May 2008 but hit 18c in January 2009 before recovering.

Chris Ellis: a career coal man, he and his partner Tony Haggarty drove Excel Coal from obscurity into the $2 billion Peabody takeover. The BRW claimed $221 million in 2010.

Chris Ellison: has benefited greatly from the boom in coal, and in particular the float of the delisted Excel Coal. Invested some of the proceeds as the founder of Mineral Resources. He owns about 44m shares. The BRW claimed $251 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $691 million in 2019.

Dale Elphinstone: owns the Tasmanian and Victorian Caterpillar franchise, plus a very tidy 77m shares in Queensland Gas before it was taken over by BG Group. The BRW claimed $565 million in 2010. Thought to possibly be Tasmania's only billionaire. The Australian valued at $682 million in 2019.

Josef El-Raghy: former managing director of mining company Centamin Egypt, he owned about 78m shares, so when the stock was trading above $2 after the GFC, he was worth around $150 million.

Rob Elstone: the former CEO of the ASX, his wealth has grown significantly largely due to the lucrative monopoly that is the ASX and the $10 million-plus he collected through the SFE Corp takeover. Also served on the NAB board.

Derek and Christine Elwin: owned 1m shares in mining engineering company Ausenco.
The stock peaked at almost $17 in June 2008 but then fell away to $2 in December 2008 before recovering.

Ron Englehart: successful home builder and property developer in Melbourne's eastern suburbs.

Erdi Family: inherited from the late Les Erdi, Erdigroup owns and operates nine hotels in Australia. Les is fondly remembered by City of Melbourne design guru Rob Adams for all his innovative developments and philanthropy in the 1990s.

Margaret Erskine: owns about 1m shares in listed investment company Djerriwarrh which are worth $5.3 million so presume there is probably a bigger portfolio and plenty of other assets.

Ed Eshuys: Joe Gutnick's former top geologist who was then CEO of St Barbara Mines with about
5m shares. Stock close to $3 in early 2020 so if shares retained, is worth plenty.

Mark Etherington: after starting a career as a carpenter, Etherington moved into the property developing business with hotels in Canberra, a wide portfolio of residential and commercial sites, and runs ECS Group, a building and maintenance company. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Andrea Evans and family: her husband Ron Evans, the former AFL President and Spotless CEO, passed away in 2007. His legacy lives on and her wealth is estimated at a figure upwards of $100 million. The family assets are managed by son David Evans, who is also chair of the listed Evans Dixon and is a former Essendon FC President.

David Evans:
the former managing director of Channel Nine in Melbourne who went to Hollywood to successfully run the Hallmark Channel and then served on boards like Fairfax, Village Roadshow and BSkyB.

Paul Evans: ran Ironbridge Capital, which made plenty through its investment in Riviera Group, a leisure craft builder. Also has an extensive property portfolio. Made BRW Young Rich List.

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F 71

Ahmed Fahour: has enjoyed big pay days from a variety of employers including Citi, NAB, Australia Post and Latitude Financial Group, plus made a range of astute property investments over the years.


Nick Fahey: an executive director and co-founder of Pointsbet who jointly owns 11.5 million shares in the company with his brother Andrew Fahey.

Andrew Fahey: the brother of Pointsbet executive director and co-founder Nick Fahey who jointly owns 11.5 million shares in the company with his sibling.

Fairfax family: lost control of the family media empire when Warwick Fairfax privatised it in 1987, but then built up Rural Press before merging with Fairfax and then later selling out completely. The BRW claimed $1.32 billion in 2010 but would be much less now.

George Falkiner: still owns about 60,000 acres of land, much carrying valuable cotton crops, in the Warren-Nyngan area of NSW. Inherited the Haddon Rig Merino Stud at Warren in NSW when his father died.

Nick Falloon: the former Ten and Fairfax chair made more than $30 million out of PBL and Ten courtesy of his fat salary and lucrative options scheme. Is currently deputy chair of Nine and chair of Domain.

James Fantaci: the long-time Babcock & Brown exe
cutive director had owned about 4.6m shares as of the end of 2007 following a downsizing of almost half of his holding during that year. The stock peaked at almost $35 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $140 million, but collapsed in late 2008.

Steve Farley: he once part-owned the Cambridge Tavern in the pokies ravaged local government areas of Fairfield, NSW, for more than 10 years, but sold out to ALH/Woolworths for a reported $45 million.

Scott Farquhar
: co-founder of software development company Atlassian. The Australian valued him at $9.012 billion in 2019.

Andrew Farrell: Member of Macquarie Group management committee. Total 2018-19 pay of $10 million and also made many millions on his shareholding.

Farrell family: taking over the Federal Group hotel chain in 1969, Greg Farrell senior renamed it Federal Hotels & Resorts. Since, the business has grown into the largest private sector employer in Tasmania and has a monopoly over the gaming industry there. The Australian valued them at $2.064 billion in 2019.

Peter Farrell
: the driving force behind ResMed, a listed company that sell devices for sleeping disorders. Additionally, he own an impressive collection of Australian art.

Richard Farleigh: an ex-pat Aussie living in London, he is chairman of Oxonica and a major shareholder with a 20 per cent holding. He also is well known in the UK for his appearances on the Dragons' Den, a TV program on which a panel of investors berate would-be entrepreneurs. The son of a farmer, he started out working at the Reserve Bank and then Bankers Trust for ten years. Was then headhunted by a Bermuda Hedge fund which is where he made enough money after three years to retire.

Jeff Fatt: the oldest member of The Wiggles, he was once member of 1980s rock band The Cockroaches.


Simon Fenwick: Brisbane boy who for worked for EY, did a stint in investment banking and then made his fortune as the co-founder of US-based fund manager International Value Investors. Donated $1 million to the right wing lobby group Advance Australia after being politicised by the COVID-19 lockdowns.

Rob Ferguson: the former Bankers Trust Australia boss walked out with $23 million when the business was sold in 1999. Has chaired companies such as IMF and GPT and also made plenty as a shareholder in the Magic Millions.

Terrence Fern: former CEO of Petsec Energy who owned 25m shares when the stock peaked at $3.40 in May 2006 when he was worth more than $80 million. However, the stock tumbled to 15c in December 2008 before recovering.

George Fernandes: worth more than $200 million thanks to a large portfolio of industrial land in Sydney's western suburbs and a very expensive house overlooking the naval dockyards around Potts Point.

Peter Ferrari:
sold his business and shares in the Extra Transport Group of Companies to Toll Transport in 2010 for an undisclosed sum.

Paul Fiani
: following a stint at UBS as a fund manager, he founded Integrity Investment Management that peaked with more than $1 billion under management which has contributed the bulk of his wealth.

Anthony Field: founding member of The Wiggles, most of the wealth from touring has delivered regular earnings of $45 million.

Michael Figg: Sydney-based private investor who paid $20.85 million for 55 Swanston St in 2003. He then sub-divided and sold the three ground-floor shops for $15 million and has continued to divide the 10 levels of office space above.

Adrian Fini: long-time WA property developer who merged his business with Mirvac and then ran the Perth division of the company for a few years whilst owning 8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6 in December 2008 when he was worth more than $50 million.

Anthony Fini: Fini Group founder negotiated a $180 million deal to sell his retirement village portfolio to investment bank Babcock & Brown and prominent retirement village player Primelife Corporation.

Vivian Findlow:
listed in the top 20 shareholders for REA Group of few years back with 292,239 shares worth around $30 million.

Alan and Elizabeth Finkel: biotech entrepreneurs who made plenty building companies like Axon Instruments, and purchased a Bourke St office tower in Melbourne for $34 million a few years ago. Was the Monash University chancellor and Australian chief scientist.

Barrie Finnin:
a Monash university academic who is co-inventor of the technology behind the success of listed Melbourne-based pharmaceutical play Acrux Ltd.

Millissa Fischer: former president of Altona Magic Soccer Club in Victoria, her company, Kendalle Pty Ltd ran several aged-care facilities around Melbourne's suburbs. Made the news when she voluntarily liquidated some homes with debts of around $9 million, but is said to be worth more than $20 million.


Richard Fish: made his name and wealth as a fund manager at Bennelong and profiled here as one of Australia's best share traders. Pops up on the share register of Pointsbet with 1.87 million shares worth more than $20 million in September 2020.

Isla Fisher: actress and author most famous for her role in Now You See Me. Estimated net worth of $25 million.

Fisken family: Archibald Fisken, a Scottish immigrant, first acquired some property with his uncle near Ballarat. He built a homestead in 1858 and was a great horseman. He tended cattle there and regularly mustered them 20km to market, selling them to hungry gold miners. Since, 'Lal Lal Estate' has been operated by 4 generations of Fiskens producing high quality wool. Higher rainfall and location has helped the Fisken family expand their dynasty into around 12,500 Merinos. Eventually sold their large wool property to Chinese interests in 2014.

Fitch family:
this Adelaide-based family purchased the Golden Grove Village shopping centre in South Australia from the listed CFS Retail Property Trust for a reported $100 million a few years back.

Fitzgibbon family: sold two Brisbane hotels in January 2006 for $65 million to Cairns plumber-turned pubs mogul Tom Hedley. Big winners from the introduction of pokies into Queensland.

Barry Fitzpatrick: served as CEO of Adelaide Bank for 21 years and received an $8.3 million retirement payout on top of his salary and share profits when he finally bailed in 2006.

Kevin Fitzpatrick: one of the original backers of wotif.com who sold 36.8m shares into the 2005 float for $73 million and retained about 10 million shares. The stock recovered to around $6.60 after it bottomed at $2.70 in July 2008 but was later taken over.

Mike Fitzpatrick: the Rhodes Scholar, former AFL President, Rio Tinto director and Carlton Premiership captain collected about $75 million for the second half of his stake in infrastructure group Hastings Funds Management on 1 July, 2005. The first half was sold for $36 million in 2002. Also made more than $10 million from the Pacific Hydro takeover.

Rod Fitzroy:
retired from Fitzroys, the prominent Melbourne commercial real estate consultancy he founded in 1973, but still acted as a consultant for many years hence. He was also chairman of the failed Timbercorp and prominent in the Victorian racing industry.

Brian Flannery: of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009 when he was a large stakeholder. The AFR valued him at $1.4 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.02 billion in 2019

Fleming family: Jim Fleming built the family fortune through his supermarket chain but the interests now extend to retail property in Queensland and the massive Eliza Stud in Victoria, which feeds his passion for thoroughbreds. The BRW claimed $350 million a few years back.

John Fletcher: despite doing an awful job as Coles CEO, the former army man profited to the turn of more than $20 million from his 6 years in charge and that came after enjoying a $7 million final payout from Brambles after new chairman Don Argus forced him out.

Roger Fletcher
: he owns Australia's biggest sheep-meat processor, Fletchers International out of Dubbo, NSW. The BRW claimed $218 million a few years back. The Australian valued at $405 million in 2019.

Doug Flynn: a Newcastle boy who climbed the ranks at News Ltd and then ran the London-listed media and marketing services company, Aegis Group, before moving to Rentokil as CEO in 2005 after almost signing on the dotted line to take over at Fairfax. Now back in Australia and has served on a few boards such as WA News, Seven West Media, APN Outdoor and NextDC.

Nathan Berkley & Jim Flynn: owners of Derwent Howard, a publishing company, which moved into the online games market with their website, gameplayer.com.au. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Brett Fogarty
: this Perth-based entrepreneur built his initial fortune in gold before expanding into rubbish, construction and engineering.

Adrian Fonseca:
a Singapore-based banker who sold his home in Vaucluse, Sydney, for $7 million in April 2009.

Joan Ford: wealthy Queensland family which is realising a substantial fortune from land holdings on the Sunshine Coast such as Pelican Waters.

Andrew Forrest: the Perth entrepreneur is one of Australia's richest through his 30% stake in Fortescue Metals Group which in early 2020 was worth around $10 billion thank to the booming iron ore price. 2019 Rich List valuations: The Australian $7.34 billion, AFR $7.99 billion.

Rodney Forrester: managing director of Queensland developer FKP (later called Aveo) from 1987 until 2003. Remained a non-executive director after retiring as CEO given he owned about 7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $7.50 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $45 million. Has a private development company, Aria, with his son Tim.

David Forsyth: the former Oxiana Resources company secretary owned 3.4m shares which were worth more than $13 million when the stock peaked at around $4 in mid-2007, before his wealth plunged after the ill-fated merger with Zinifex to create Oz Minerals just as the resources bubble was bursting.

John Forsyth: his franchise book selling business, Dymocks, was founded by his great uncle in 1881. Valuable real estate holdings drive his wealth which is supplemented by a mango and macadamia nut growing business.

Henry Foster: owner of the North Australian Pastoral Company which, at its peak, was the country's fourth largest private property empire by size.

William Foster: along with his brother, he is one of Australia's largest cattle producers.

Guy Fowler: a veteran UBS investment banker who is now helping out at Adara Partners but was pivotal in keeping UBS near the top of the investment banking league ladder for more than a decade, particularly with all the GFC-related capital raisings.

Ken Fowlie: the former executive director of Slater & Gordon owned about 26.8m shares and was worth close to $200 million when the stock peaked at more than $7 in 2015. Subsequently went broke after ill-fated Quindell acquisition in the UK.

Lindsay Fox: billionaire who started with one truck and eventually took out rival Mayne Nickless. Purchased Avalon and Essendon airports for peanuts. The 2010 BRW claimed $1.87 billion. The Australian valued him at $3.52 billion in 2019. One of the few Rich Listers to have appeared on Q&A. The Australian valued at $3.52 billion in 2019

Kelli Fox: co-founded website, astrology.com, in 1995, which was sold just 8 years later for $28 million. She now runs The Astrologer, which sends content through mobile phones and other websites. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Morry Fraid and Ruben Freid: the majority of their fortune was built through control of the Spotlight chain, which isn't known for paying its workers well. The Australian valued them at $2.319 billion in 2019 and The AFR valued them at $1.61 billion.

Robert Franco: former director of Decmil Group, formally Paladio Group, who owned 8m shares worth more than $10 million at the peak but the business has struggled in recent years raising $50 million in a capital raising at just 5c in 2020.

Matt Franich: starting with a lemonade stall when he was five, he once owned 25% of a business that owned five Nightowl Stores.

Erich Fraunschiel
: made plenty as Wesfarmers finance director for the 10 years until 2002 then became a professional director, including with Worley Parsons and Woodside where he built up shareholdings worth more than $2 million. Retired meekly from the WA News board rather than risk being voted off by Kerry Stokes at the 2008 AGM.

Mark Frawley: owned 9.21 million MFS shares before resigning on May 15, 2006. If he sold, everything is fine but if he retained them during GFC, it's not so good as MFS went broke.

Malcolm Freake and family: started software company Huon Corporation in 1986 and collected about $100 million in 2001 when it was sold to UK company, the Innovation Group.

Laurence Freedman
: the co-founder of fund manager Equitilink sold out to a Scottish firm for more than $100 million a few years back. Also made heaps as a partner of the consortium that bought Network Ten out of receivership in 1992. In 2010 the BRW claimed $135 million.

Peter Freedman: the Sydney-based founder and chairman of Rode Microphones loudly declared himself a Rich Lister in 2020 by paying $9 million for Kurt Cobain's guitar, which he plans to take on a world tour to promote mental health funding.

Richard Freudenstein: Former Foxtel chief executive and current Cricket Australia board member sold his Mosman home for $23 million in 2019.

Max Fremder: a co-founder of chemical giant Nufarm, Max also made plenty from his 15% stake in Select Harvests which aspires to be the world's largest almond grower. He was chairman of Select Harvest when the stock peaked at $14.50 in March 2006, valuing his stake at $85 million.

David French: formerly with ESSO Australia, he rose to be global head of environmental services for Exxon-Mobil.

Paul Fridman: founder of property development company Fridcorp, he built the company from nothing to about $500 million in developments.

Tab Fried
: first leapt into the public eye after losing money on lippy queen Poppy King, but also had a large property portfolio including a one-third interest in the giant Eureka Tower at Southgate in Melbourne.

Tony Froggatt: an Australian who rose to be CEO of UK brewer Scottish & Newcastle for almost five years until returning to Australia in 2007 when he joined a range of boards including Axa Asia Pacific.

Bryan Frost: executive chairman of Mintails Limited who owned 21m shares worth $18 million when the stock peaked at 90c in June 2007 before taking a dive.

Ray Frost: the founder of Ray's Outdoors, Australia's largest outdoor entertainment and camping leisure retailer, who grew the small family run disposal store in Geelong, to manufacturing tents locally by hand and then gradually expanding to importing from overseas. In 50 years, Ray's Outdoors has grown to 38 stores in 5 states before selling out to Super Retail Group in 2010.

Gordon Fu: he is Australia's largest private owner of shopping centres, all within south-east Queensland. The BRW claims $845 million. The Australian valued him at $1.696 billion in 2019.

Cedric Fuchs
: co-founder of the Charter Hall
Properties Group who owned 5m shares when the stock peaked at $3.20 in October 2007 before taking a dive.

Paul Fudge: a former rag trader who purchased a coal-seam gas tenements in Queensland and then sold out for big profits. Forbes valued at $US580m in March 2010. The Australian valued at $571 million in 2019.

Fysh family: another Tattersall's estate with $72 million worth of shares at the time of the float, plus the tens of millions in distributions over the past decade.

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Patrick and Angela Gallagher: own pokies pubs in Queensland and NSW including the Meadowbrook Hotel in Logan.

Mario Gallo: was one of three shareholders in Sydney-based Sasso Pre-cast Concrete which was sold to Brickworks for $35 million in March 2010.

Neil Gamble: is a director of Engin Ltd, Australia's leading VOIP provider and Chairman of Ryarc Media, a leading supplier of digital signage software. Made plenty as CEO of pay-TV company Australis Media, Star City Casino and Solution 6.

Peter Gammell: the long-time private CEO for the Kerry Stokes empire is himself a quiet, effective, tough Scottish bean counter. With impeccable breeding and super connections, the only personal bauble visible to the human eye is a winery in Margaret River called Wildwood. Thought to be worth more than $100 million after spear-heading the Stokes empire, especially those Caterpillar franchises, for a decade.

Jack Gance: originally owner of Le Tan sunscreen, which he sold in 1991, has more recently developed the booming My Chemist pharmacy chain. The Australian valued at $1.46 billion in 2019.

John Gandel: following the arrival of his family from Poland, they opened a corsetry store in Collins Street. The business expanded into the retail chain Sussan which was sold in 1985. Now specialises on retail property, with his biggest asset a 50% stake in Melbourne's enormous Chadstone shopping centre. The 2010 BRW claimed $3.03 billion. Forbes valued at $US2.4bn in March 2010. The Australian valued at $6.22 billion in 2019

Gange family: Astoria Taxis and then Embassy Cabs quickly became several hundred cab licences, hotels and other property. Alf Gange and his brother Kevin, are the principals. Forbears first got into the taxi business in the 1890s, but retain a very low profile empire.

Nicholas Garling: the former Morning Star Gold CEO topped up his stake to 29 million shares in early 2011 which at the time were worth about $15 million.

Bob Gavranich: former senior executive of Mineral Resources who owned 10m shares when the stock peaked at $7.50 in September 2008.

John Gay: the bull-headed former Gunns executive chairman owns about 18.7m shares courtesy of his Tasmanian tree-slaughtering operation. The stock peaked at almost $3.80 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $50 million but then went broke and he was also convicted of insider trading, but later made a come back running a small timber operation.

Gazal family: Lebanese immigrant, Joseph Gazal founded the family business, The Gazal Corporation, making pyjamas and men's shirts. The heavyweights in their stable of clothing brands include Mambo, Calvin Klein, Van Heusen, Nautica, Lovable and Davenport. The family, led by David and Michael, still has more than $30 million invested in the public company.

Raphael Geminder: Runs and is the largest shareholder in the listed Pact Holdings Group. Married to the late Dick Pratt's daughter Fiona. Valued by The Australian at $1.08 billion.

Rob Gerard: chairman and managing director of the Gerard Corporation, it was established after the sale of family's share in the Clipsal electrical goods business, which has interests in Mistral, agriculture and property. BRW claimed $447 million in 2010.

Nick Georgalis: The Australian valued at $356 million in 2019.

Bill Gibbins: founder of trucking company FCL which was sold to LinFox. Spent part of his fortune paying $1.7 million in 2007 so the Rats of Tobruk could remain in their Melbourne building, in a sale which was largely the work of The 7.30 Report.

Charles Gibbon: founding partner at Shearwater Growth Equity. Was valued at $437 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $470 million in 2019.

Bruce Gibson: regional real estate agent, with livestock and prime rural property holdings across Victoria. He was also chairman of real estate company Alex Scott & Co.

Diana Gibson
: grand-daughter of Sir William Angliss, she inherited his wealth, but has made most of her money from property investment.

Mel Gibson: famous actor and director most well-known for his role in role in Mad Max. Estimated net worth of $425 million.

Tony Gilby: former board member of coal-seam gas sensation, Sunshine Gas, which was taken over by Queensland Gas for a reported $812 million. Mr Gilby was a big winner from the sale which delivered him a $43 million windfall.

Andrew Barlow & Adrian Giles: entrepreneurs looking to invest in new companies after the sale of their successful web traffic measuring business Hitwise for $228 million. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Ray Gillham:
one of Australia's largest individual political donors. He gave $862,000 to the crazy Citizens Electoral Council in the 2003-04 financial year. A Queensland grazier who has large land and cattle holdings in Mackay.

Warren Gilmour: former director of WA-based mining and materials company, Andean Resources, who owned 11m shares worth around $25 million after the GFC.

Nick Giorgetta: former chairman of Regis Resources whose stake was worth almost $30 million in late 2010.

Ivan Glasenberg: The Australian valued the retiring Glencore CEO at $6.764 billion in 2019.

Steven Gliddon: founder of Northcape Capital, a boutique fund manager with more than $10 billion under management. More than $20m in fully franked dividends likely to have been paid, not to mention salary plus equity in the business.

Brett Godfrey: the founding Virgin Blue managing director made more than $30 million from his time running the airline and is now continuing to invest in tourism businesses.

Amanda and Dipendra Goenka: this husband and wife team are behind the teenage girl fashion stores, Forever New, which opened their 42nd store in Melbourne's Bourke St. Dipendra also runs his own clothing factories in Asia.

David Gold: sold Azure Wireless, a wireless internet company he co-owned, to MagiNet Interactive. He has invested in start-up tech plays such as Aconex, Redbubble, homeXchange and Cableman, but is best remembered for the dstore fiasco during the dotcom boom. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Danny Goldberg: purchased beach front property in Byron Bay in 2006 for a record breaking $15.6 million.

David Goldberger and David Wieland
: long time business partners and neighbours in Toorak, their fortune came from the Solo petrol station chain which was sold in 1989. Not long after, they started another venture, Liberty Oil, which is Australia's only major independent petrol retailer. To supplement their growing wealth is the growing popularity of the chain of DFO stores, especially at airports. The BRW claims $610 million in 2010 but the DFO business subsequently got into strife and was sold.

Jim Goldburg: with a large property portfolio through CKG Properties, this Brisbane businessman and former finance director of Flight Centre, still has a large interest in the huge travel agency chain. The BRW claimed $235 million in 2010.

Colin Goldschmidt: former managing director of Silex Systems who owned 2.8m shares when the stock peaked at almost $13 in June 2007. He also acquired two US pathology laboratories for a total of $27 million.

Michael Goldsworthy: owned 6m shares in Silex Systems, which peaked at almost $13 in June 2007.

David Gonski: similar to Graeme Samuel in that he is a lawyer who made millions from investment banking and then moved his focus to community affairs such as chairing the Australia Council, NIDA and the Art Gallery of NSW. However, he owns several businesses in his own right, still sits on a powerhouse of boards such as ANZ and Sydney Airport, formerly chaired Coca-Cola Amatil and ASX and also made tens of million through Investec, the investment bank he used to chair.

Charles Goode: the former Woodside and ANZ chairman owns 781,261 shares in Australian United Investment Company which are worth more than $5 million and he also chairs stablemate DUI.
Bruce Goodfellow: former director of the chemical company Nufarm, who owned 662,914 shares when the stock peaked at almost $18 in May 2008.

Goodman family: a Sydney family who own or manage a massive global industrial property portfolio through Goodman Group. The Australian valued them at $2.287 billion in 2019.

Richard Goodmanson: the tough nut from Queensland was chief operating officer of chemical giant Du Pont, but also CEO of America West Airlines and even ran most of Pepsico's US operations for seven years after an initial 11 year stint with McKinsey. Also a former director of Rio Tinto who served on the board of QANTAS.

Delta Goodrem: famous singer and model and well known for her role as a The Voice judge. Estimated net worth of $21 million.

George Gorrow & Dan Single: founded Ksubi, a fashion label, which plans to expand internationally. They also provide designs under the name of Alba Fan Club for Jeanswest. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Bruce Gordon: beginning with the purchase of the Television Wollongong Transmissions in 1979, Bruce Gordon founded the regional media empire of WIN Corporation and is today also the largest shareholder in Nine. Lost more than $200 million when Ten went broke in 2018. The 2010 BRW claimed $1.65 billion. Forbes valued at $US700m in March 2010. The Australian valued at $781 million in 2019.

Michael Gordon: after selling out of child-care company Peppercorn, shrewd investments of his private investment company Bydand continue to build a $100 million-plus empire.

Peter Gordon: former executive director and deputy chair of law firm Slater & Gordon who owned 26.8m shares and got out well before the crash. Now chair of the Western Bulldogs and runs his own firm Gordon Legal, which has poached lots of staff off Slaters.

Craig Gore: the founder of the financial services group Wright Patton Shakespeare, his interests are spread from property development to being the former owner of a V8 super car racing team, but was dragged into messy litigation in 2020.

James Gorman: Melbourne boy who rose to be global CEO of Morgan Stanley. Started with Merrill Lynch and was poached by Morgan Stanley to head retail in early 2006.

Jim Gorman: former business partner of the late mining mogul Ken Talbot, he owns several properties in Queensland including some pastoral holdings.

Tom Gorog: former managing director of the Victorian division of Waterman Consulting Engineers AHW, he also has property holdings that push his wealth above $20 million.

George Gorrow: co-founder of the high fashion label and highly successful Ksubi. A keen surfer who has diversifed into other areas including Baddies Bar in New York.

John Gowing: still the largest shareholder in retailer Gowings with a 37% stake or more than 16.2m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3.90 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million.

Richard Goyder: former managing director of Wesfarmers, he made more than $50 million from salary and share profits during his time with the business. Now chairs, Qantas, Woodside and the AFL.

Timothy Goyder: the Perth-based mining entrepreneur is chair of Chalice Gold and on May 15 2020 disclosed that he had pocketed $10.5 million selling 10 million shares or 4.3% of the company. He retains a 13% stake and has a range of other mining interests as this recent interview explains. A rare Rich Lister who is on Twitter.

Deryck Graham: former director of WA based Quickstep Holdings who owned 36m shares when the stock peaked at almost $1 in May 2007 before tumbling.

James Graham: has been involved with Wesfarmers since 1976 and is a former managing director of its Gresham Partners investment bank. Owned about 1m shares in Wesfarmers and now chair of Coles.

Neil Graham: a retired crane driver who bought some land in WA in 1986 for $200,000, had his land compulsorily acquired to facilitate the construction of the Perth-to-Mandurah railway. His application for compensation rate was rejected by the WA government claiming it was too much and instead paid out $2.5 million. After a six year legal battle, in early 2010 he was awarded $15 million for his troubles.

Richard Graham: began in the technology industry establishing the Sydney-based Computerland and founder/chairman of the online motor parts group, Infomedia. He owned more than $100 million worth of shares at the peak.


Granger family: executive director Richard and brother John Granger were large holders in Southern Cross Equities which was sold for $150 million sale to Bell Financial Group.

Ben Gray:
the Melbourne-based son of former Tasmanian Liberal Premier Robin Gray started out in investment banking at CS First Boston before forging a long career in private equity, first as TPG's Australian leader and later through his own firm BGH.

Bruce Gray: the inventor of a liver cancer treatment which turned him into the largest shareholder in the listed Sirtex Medical. He owns about 17m shares or 31% of the company which is continuing to boom.

Andrew Grech: former managing director of Slater & Gordon who owned about 26.8m shares which peaked in value at more than $150 million before later going broke.

Alan Green and John Law: Alan Green began making wetsuits in 1969 with a $2500 loan from his father. In 1973, with his surfing buddy John Law, they started the Quicksilver surfwear empire. The BRW claimed $308 million in 2010.

John Green: the former Macquarie Banker makes our list alone on his 941,510 shares in Worley Parsons. The stock peaked at $52 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $50 million but subsequently tumbled back closer to $10.

Phil Green: the former Babcock & Brown CEO has seen a paper empire of more than $500 million plunge to less than $50 million. By the end of 2007 he held around 12.7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $35 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $440 million, but collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.

Rodney Green: the former chief investment officer at Perpetual has made plenty since parting ways with the funds management giant, including from his 1.46m shares in boutique fund manager Treasury Group. The stock peaked at almost $16.50 in December 2007 before falling away and later merging.


Mervyn Greene: former chairman of WA based Deep Yellow uranium mining, who owned 74.3 million shares when the stock peaked at almost 67c in April 2007 before falling away. Retired as a non-executive director in 2006.

Ron Greentree: possibly Australia's largest wheat grower from Rowena in NSW who had a solid stake in AWB shares before it was taken over. In 2010 the BRW claimed $164 million.

Lex and Peter Greensill: Derive most of their wealth from London based supply-chain finance company Greensill of which Lex is the chief executive. The Australian valued at $1.52 billion in 2019

Michael Gregg: The Australian valued at $320 million in 2019.

Michael Grehan: former director of death services company Invocare who owned more than 1m shares when he resigned in February 2007 which peaked in value at close to $20 million.

Mark Greig: owner of project marketing company, Greig Property Group, which is prominent on the Gold Coast.

David Greiner: Co-founder of IT services company Campaign Monitor, he was valued at $403 million by The AFR in 2019. Spent $23.18 million on a Cronulla beach house in Sydney. The Australian valued at $732 million in 2019, along with his partner Ben Richardson.

Lady Jean Falconer Griffin: pops up on the ALE Property Group top 20 shareholders with a $7 million holding so not unreasonable to assume she's worth more than $20 million overall.

Alan Griffiths: Paul Keating's Industry Minister left Parliament after the sandwich shop affair but picked up a technology licence rather opportunistically from the CSIRO and built it into an IT business that he sold to a US firm for $30 million a few years ago.

David Griffiths: former non-executive director of ASX 300 gold producing and exploration company Silver Lake Resources which operates in Western Australia's Mount Monger and Murchison regions.

Ian Griffiths: helped build up Australian Wealth Management, which merged with IOOF Holdings in April 2009 delivering him about 13m shares.

John Grill: the chair and largest personal shareholder of engineering giant Worley Parsons, which floated at $2 in 2002 but soared to above $50 at the peak before tumbling back close to $10. The BRW claimed $1.33 billion in 2010.The Australian valued at $457 million in 2019.

Edeltraud Grill:
the former wife of the billionaire CEO of Worley Parsons, John Grill, who reportedly sold 8 million shares worth more than $150 million several years ago.

Phillip Grimaldi: WA-based former Murchison Metals director reportedly received a tax bill from the ATO for around $35 million, resulting from Australia's largest tax probe, Project Wickenby. With a reported $55 million in bank accounts and tens of millions in shares, the tax bill hurt be he stays well north of our cut-off of $20 million.

Angus & Richard Grinham: run Grinham Managed Funds, which has a large number of investors from the US. The BRW claimed $368 million in 2010.

Bruno Grollo: arriving in Australia in 1928, Luigi Grollo starting up a paving company which was carried on by his sons Bruno and Rino, and built into the construction giant Grocon. Responsible for many Melbourne landmarks, including the grandstand at the MCG, they own large developments in Melbourne's CBD. He has retired now, leaving the running of the company to his sons. The BRW claims $833 million. Forbes valued at $US560m in March 2010. The Australian valued at $645 million in 2019.

Rino Grollo: after the carve up of the Grollo empire, he and brother Bruno went separate ways. Through his company, Equiset, he continues construction and development projects in Melbourne and Sydney. The BRW claimed $320 million in 2010. The Australian valued him and his wife at $544 million in 2019.

Matthew Grounds: outgoing head of UBS in Australia thought to be worth around $100 million. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Eddie Groves
: founder and former CEO of the child-care giant ABC Learning, his wealth has plummeted after margin calls and the collapsed of his old company but he has retained his shirt and a few residual assets sufficient to fund a lavish post-collapse wedding.

Patrick Grove: serial entrepreneur in a range of business including Catcha Group, ICar and Iproperty. The Australian valued at $841 million in 2019.

Andrew Grover: co-founder of recruitment company Gemteq Executive which was sold for $19.5 million. Current director of LAPD Pty Ltd which recently purchased a corner site near Crown Casino for $6 million.

Reg Grundy's family: an Australian icon and successful television entrepreneur, who brought to our screens TV shows such as Neighbours, Prisoner and a large variety of game shows. The BRW claimed $850 million. Died in 2016.

Michael Gudinski: founder of Mushroom records and the Frontier Touring Company which was ranked fifth largest concert promoter by Billboard magazine, the Mushroom juggernaut continues to grow including the film production division which was responsible for hits such as Wolf Creek and Chopper.

Geoffrey Guest: owned 6.76m shares in Count Financial when serving on the board. The stock peaked at almost $3.50 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $20 million, bottomed at 95c in December 2008 and then recovered. Retired as a non-executive director in 2006 ahead of $373 million takeover by CBA in 2011.

Stewart Gull: the former Carlton footballer started developing regional Victorian retirement villages in 1992 and grew to a position of pursuing a float of the business under the Country Club Villages brand.

Peter Gunn: renowned for his uncanny timing for investment in transport stocks, in 1999 his family owned company PGA partly merged with Mayne Nickless which has since been broken up and taken over. The BRW claimed $585 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.26 billion in 2019. Prominent at the Melbourne Business School.

Jamuna Gurung and Shesh Ghale: Having arrived from Nepal, the couple have pioneered in the Australian private education sector, being the owners of the Melbourne Institute of Technology with 2500 students. Having made their fortune in education they are now invested in property and are developing at $500 million dollar hotel. The Australian valued at $1.10 billion in 2019

Tim Gurner: Melbourne property developer who focuses on the inner city, particularly the City of Yarra. The Australian valued at $652 million in 2019.

H

Tony Haggarty
: a career coal man, he and his colleagues drove Excel Coal from obscurity into the $2 billion Peabody takeover. The former managing director of Whitehaven Coal, owned shares worth more than $120 million in March 2010.The BRW claimed $306 million in 2010.

Lim Kim Hai: former executive chairman of the regional airline service, Rex Express, he owns about 25m shares or 20% of the company. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million, bottomed at 85c in March 2009 and recovered to around $1.20 in early 2020.

David Hains and family
: owning a hedge fund that specialises in long-term international investments, The Portland House Group generates much of this billionaire's wealth. In the 1980s, he was one of Australia's most successful race horse owners and breeders, forming the highly regarded and successful Kingston Park Stud. The 2010 BRW claims $2.15 billion, although this is very hard to believe as this Crikey story explains. Forbes valued at $US690m in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $2.851 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $2.85 billion in 2019

Tony Hakim: former controlling shareholder of mobile phone and car radio retailer, Strathfield Group. He is the founder of the Clear Communications Group which he has sold into Strathfield in December 2008 for a reported $115 million in shares.

Bruce Hales
: the Elect Vessel of the Exclusive Brethren church and leader of over 40,000 followers worldwide, he constantly receives cash and property donations from followers. He has control over a vast network of properties and also looms over the 800 Brethren businesses spread across Australasia and the world.

David Hales: the founder of Betty's Burgers sold his Sunshine Beach mansion (once owned by Pat Rafter) for $17 million in 2020.

Anthony Hall: former technology director of medical IT company Pro Medicus who owned 30m shares when the stock peaked at $1.75 in March 2006. The Australian valued at $860 million in 2019, along with his partner Sam Hupert

Peter Hall: former executive chairman of boutique fund manager Hunter Hall International who owned 11.5m shares but sold out cheaply to Soul Patts in bizarre circumstances in 2017. The stock peaked at almost $18.50 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $200 million. He even toyed with buying The Bulletin magazine.

Deborah Halliday:
top 20 shareholder of Paladin Energy with about 2.5m shares or 0.41%. The stock peaked at almost $10.50 in April 2007 when she was worth more than $25 million, but then fell away.

Jonathan Hallinan: Owner of a property empire. The Australian valued at $866 million in 2019

Malcolm Halstead: finance of director Kerr Neilson's Platinum Asset Management who owned 23m shares worth $160 million when the stock peaked at $8.80 in June 2007.

Justus Hammer: a Sydney-based internet entrepreneur who was one of the major shareholders in online buying group Spreets which was sold in early 2011 to Yahoo7 for $40 million.

William Hames: former chairman of Perth-based Cedar Woods Properties who owned 7.7m shares worth $40m when the stock peaked at almost $6 before falling away to a low of 90c after the GFC and then recovering to be above $8 in early 2020.

Allen Hamilton: he owns AQUIS staging island in Fiji. They bring in Alpacas from Peru, quarantine them in Fiji and then fly them to Australia. Fiji leases Hamilton the island and he spent $10 million developing the quarantine facilities. He has rural interests all over Australia and lives in a palatial mansion north of Daylesford.

Robert Hance: former CEO of Timbercorp who owned about 51m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4 in July 2006 when he was worth more than $200 million, but the company later went broke.

Ron Hancock: former managing director and founder of investment company Wide Bay Australia who owned 1.6m shares when the stock peaked at $13.70 in February 2007.

David Hancock: got lucky as an executive director of Afterpay who made close to $100 million on his options as the stock rocketed in 2019 shortly before he exited.

Robert Hand: executive director and senior portfolio manager for K2 Asset Management Holdings, who owned shares worth more than $11 million in March 2010.

Handbury family: their fortune originated from Murdoch media interests because Helen Handbury is one of the three sisters of Rupert Murdoch. The family's main investment is Ace radio - a regional radio network, but is supported by investments in properties around Victoria, including a range of golf courses. The BRW claimed $297 million in 2010 which sounded a touch light given that Rupert collectively paid his sisters about $600 million during the 1990s.

Julianne Hannaford: pops up on the top 20 of listed education provider Navitas, formerly known as IBT Education, who owned about 9m shares which were worth more than $50 million. The company was taken over by private equity in 2019.

Hannan family: Sydney based, the Hannan family have been known to move with the times. Francis Hannan, later moving into newspapers and printing, established the family business as butchery in 1887. Now the family owns many media interests and are extending into property development. The BRW claimed $680 million in 2010.

Alan Hansen: a former US Marine Corps captain who arrived in Australia in 1969 and established an abalone diving operation. This grew into Tasmanian Seafoods, Australia's largest processor of abalone and sea cucumbers. The BRW claimed $211 million.

Andrew Hansen: built his fortune through his late father Ken establishing the now listed Hansen Technologies which has produced computer billing systems since 1971. Still the major shareholder and CEO worth more than $50 million.

Peter Harburg: a Brisbane-based private investor who purchased the Brisbane State Law building for close $100 million.

Duncan Hardie: founder and chairman of Hardie Holdings which used Graham Richardson for lobbying and made a clear $100 million profit on one Hunter Valley deal after Planning Minister Frank Sartor came through with a rezoning.

Frank Hargrave
and family: he established labour contract company Skilled Engineering in 1964 which has provided the bulk of the family's wealth. Son Greg Hargrave was then CEO before the business merged with Programmed and then was taken over by a Japanese company. The BRW claimed $390 million in 2010.

Steve Harker:
Westpac board member and former Australian Morgan Stanley CEO who recorded the biggest house sale of 2019, selling his Point Piper mansion for $40 million to entrepreneur Gabriel Jakob.

Hugh Harley: senior Commonwealth Bank executive who left in June 2007 but made plenty on his shares.

Kerry Harmanis
: the former Jubilee Mines CEO collected $500 million from the perfectly timed 2007 Xstrata takeover. The BRW claimed $520 million in 2010.

Harris Family: founders of the Castlemaine Bacon Company who began the business in 1905, and successfully ran the business for 100 years until they sold to Denis Jen and KR in 2005.

David Harris: founder and managing director of Harris Farm Markets in Sydney, which has an annual turnover of over $300m. Married to Cathy Rossi, they are parents to Lachlan Harris, who worked as press secretary to former prime minister Kevin Rudd.

Geoff Harris: he revolutionised the retail travel business when he co-founded the discount travel franchise, Flight Centre. The BRW claimed $410 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $940 million in 2019

Ken Harris: a large grain farmer from Rowena in NSW who had a solid stake in AWB shares before it was taken over.

David Harrison: long time executive of Charter Hall who owned about 8m shares before the GFC when the stock peaked at $3.20 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $25 million.
Jason Hart: owns software company Protocom, which grew from his garage in Canberra to an international business with the help of toll free phone numbers. Hart keeps ahead of technology so his business is always ready to make a profit, and has deals in Germany, the US and the UK. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Morgan Hart:
a former executive director of Regis Resources whose stake was worth more than $10 million in late 2010.

Gerry Harvey: 30% shareholder in Harvey Norman. The 2010 BRW claimed $1.69 billion. Donated to bush-fire relief through his Magic Millions auction in January 2020. The AFR valued him at $1.9 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.58 billion in 2019

Lynette Harvey: most of her wealth remains wedded to her former husband, Gerry Harvey of Harvey Norman fame. The BRW claims $221 million.

Harvey family: various arms of the family control assets worth more than $110 million thanks to their Tattersall's shareholding. It was this family that even delivered Martin Bryant an asset that would have handed him about $4 million in capital and distributions by now if he hadn't done the massacre at Port Arthur.

Alex Harvey: Chief Financial Officer of Macquarie Group. Total 2018-19 pay of $6.6 million and has also made millions on equity incentives.

Jon Hasler
: the QM Properties website claims it is "one of Australia's premier property developers," and our spy in Queensland claims the owner is worth more than $200 million. Also owns plenty of race horses.

Havas family: pop up on the Contango Microcap share register with almost $1 million worth of shares, suggesting Dr George and his wife Lynnette are probably worth more than $20 million.

Garrick Hawkins: was managing partner at Bain & Co (now Deutsche Bank) at a very early age and by the mid 1980s was just 35 and reportedly worth $50 million. Made serious money through his own firm Matrix. He secured one of Australia's largest-ever tax deals for the West Australian government and made an additional $40-60 million out of that over ten years. His known assets include a $20 million house in Vaucluse, several farms including a $10 million horse stud and one near Oberon boasting Australia's largest private garden. Garrick also makes plenty from his London investment bank and owns 51% of Orlani group which has around $250 million in industrial and commercial office parks around Sydney. He also built a $120 million hotel in London.

Peter Hay: former managing director of contract miner Sedgman who owned about 8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.20 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $50 million.

Brian Hayden:
since commencing trading in Torquay, on Victoria's Surf Coast, in 1949, Brian's real estate company has grown into the largest real estate practice on the Surf Coast.

Hayes family: own large property holdings in South Eastern Australia to support their thoroughbred breeding and training operations.

Darren Hayes: found fame with band Savage Garden and is now a solo artist with his own label, Powdered Sugar. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Robert Healy: listed in the top 20 of hot rocks company Geodynamics with about 15m shares. Also has 25 million or 1.74% of PanAust and owns about 5m shares in Clive Palmer's Australasian Resources.

Peter Hearl - formerly with ESSO Australia, he rose to be president of Pizza Hut and then chief development office of parent company Yum Brands, although he retired on March 31, 2008, and is now coming in as chair of the Woolworths spin off Endeavour Group.

Heck family: owns or leases about 700 hectares of caneland between Brisbane and the Gold Coast (about 10% of the annual cane crush). It owns the only private mill in Queensland, plus the Windaroo Golf Club. The real money will eventually come from residential development and this family has already started down this path in the Beenleigh area.

Tom Hedley: beginning as a plumber in 1969, he began building homes in North Queensland, which led to the formation of the highly successful Hedley Group, although the credit crisis forced some major hotel sales in 2008. The BRW claimed $285 million in 2010 although it would be nothing like that now.

Owen Hegarty: the big-talking former Oxiana CEO owned 27m shares which were worth more than $100 million when the stock peaked at around $4 in mid-2007, before his wealth plunged after the ill-fated merger with Zinifex to create Oz Minerals just as the resources bubble was bursting. Collected an outrageous $8 million payout even after shareholders voted down an earlier $10.4 million payout.
James Height: co-founder of online retailer Adore Beauty who enjoyed a $46 million pay day in 2020 selling 40% of his shares in the Melbourne-based company when it floated in 2020. See AFR coverage. Earlier sold a 60% stake in the business to private equity firm Quadrant in 2019 which valued the company at $110 million.


Hoss and Gillian Heinrich: owners of Military Rose who streeted her rivals to win Queensland's richest horse race - the $2 million Magic Millions. The construction boss and former chairman of The Gold Coast Turf Club, and horse trainer wife own Heinrich Bloodstock which has been a big buyer of yearlings over the years.

Michael Heine and family: founder of Netwealth, The AFR valued him at $1.55 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.30 billion in 2019

Joseph Hellen: property investor whose private company, The Hellen Group, purchased Centro's Ringwood shopping centre in Melbourne for $39 million in 2008. He also holds other retail property here and in the US.

Justin Hemmes: owner of a $150 million city entertainment complex, Ivy in Sydney. He also owns commercial and private property in Sydney's exclusive Vaucluse. Donated 500k to bushfire relief. The Australian valued at $1.05 billion in 2019

Warwick Hemsley: former non-executive director of Perth-based developer Peet who owned 19m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.42 in October 2006 when he was worth more than $75 million.

Chris Hemsworth: famous actor and model from Melbourne and Phillip Island, most famous for his role as Thor in the Marvel Comics movie franchise. Estimated net worth of $130 million. Donated $1 million to the bush fires recovery.

Liam Hemsworth: famous actor and model from Melbourne, most famous for his role in the The Hunger Games movie franchise. Estimated net worth of over $26 million.

Aaron Hendler: having established a successful business of manufacturing sports apparel in South Africa, he purchased the Australian distribution rights of Reebok which has since boomed.

Paul Henry: the co-founder of Bennelong Asset Management sold his Palm Beach property in Sydney for a reported $16 million in 2018.

Judith Henzell
: wealthy Queensland family which is realising a substantial fortune from land holdings on the Sunshine Coast such as Pelican Waters.

David Herrman: a beneficiary of the long-standing Sydney-based electrical switch manufacturer, HPM Industries. Competing against a flood of cheaper alternatives from Asia, HPM Industries is under pressure to maintain profits. The BRW claimed $285 million in 2010.

Myer Herzberg
: behind the Melbourne-based Denman audio retail chain, his wealth grew with a successful investment in listed company Infomedia.

Lleyton Hewitt: tennis player who owns property in Australia worth over $30 million, and has a lucrative contract with Yonex.

John Higgins: the investing buddy of wealthy lawyer Allan Myers QC held a one-third interest in their $100 million-plus aquarium business and even donated $3 million to Melbourne University as you can see here. The Australian valued at $696 million in 2019.

Peter and Rod Higgins
: beginning their working lives as self-employed boat builders, their careers turned sharply into home-loan mortgage broking, establishing Mortgage Choice, which has hit harder times of late, such that BRW dumped them in 2008.

Hill family: chairman of Adelaide-based Hills Industries, which still produces the iconic Hills hoist clothes line that was created by his father and uncle. They own around 15m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6.80 in October 2007 when they were worth more than $90 million, and bottomed at $2.80 in January 2009 but is now marginally improving.

Hill family: the three brothers behind streetwear company Globe International are still worth more than $50 million despite a mixed record as a listed company. The BRW claims $257 million.

Danny Hill: Irish born businessman who owns the Chardan Development Group which produced the residential precinct Sunshine Cove in Queensland. The BRW claims $388 million. The Australian valued at $502 million in 2019.

David Hill: former global head of Fox Sports for News Corp and arguably the international doyen of sports broadcasting. Paid more than $30 million by the Murdochs over a couple of decades with them.

Gary Hill: a farmer/grazier, he inherited property from his grandfather who owned Yarrabee Station situated at Dingo. Felix Resources mined the Yarrabee mine for high quality coal for many years. At one point he also owned a very popular Kiosk in the Botanical Gardens in Rockhampton.

Michael Hintze: owner of hedge fund manager CQS who was named 2008 Australian of the Year in London for his philanthropic and charity work. The BRW claims $529 million. Forbes valued at $US1.1bn in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $3.55 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $3.55 billion in 2019.

Eddie Hirsch: co-founder of Hawthorn-based United Petroleum and a significant property owner.Dr Harry Hirschowitz: The South African trained doctor has a major practice in Bondi and pops up on the Macquarie Group share register as the owner of about 60,000 shares worth about $7 million in mid-2020.

Brian Hodges: former managing director of Bradken, one of Australia's biggest and oldest heavy engineering companies, who owned 2.8m shares worth about $40 million when the stock peaked at almost $15 in December 2007 before tumbling to a low of $2.50 in January 2009 and then getting taken over a few years later.

Michael Hodgson: Perth property developer valued at $2.34 billion by The AFR in 2019.

Michael and Suzanne Hodgson: the Perth-based couple paid $8.2 million for an apartment in the tightly held Noosa Court building in 2006.

Jeff Hogan: an electrician by training and worked for WMC Resources as a Supervisor, and for SECWA/Mines Department as a Mines Inspector prior to founding Positron in Kalgoorlie in 1987. Built the business to having revenues exceeding $100 million by the time it was sold to RCR Tomlinson in October 2007.


Lindsey Hogg: Melbourne-based businessman who turns 80 this year and made his fortune in plastics manufacturing but stayed below the radar until The AFR reported in 2020 that he was looking to donate his $500 million art collection. Truly!

Kerry Hoggard: former chairman of Nufarm who owned 2.3m shares worth more than $40 million when the stock peaked at almost $18 in May 2008.

Daryl Holmes: former controlling shareholder in Queensland-based administration and management systems company, 1300 smiles, who owns about 15m shares or 75% of the company. The stock peaked at almost $3.40 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $80 million.

Janet Holmes a Court: she inherited the remnants of her late husband's wealth and is known for her strong social conscience. The BRW claimed $260 million in 2010.

Paul Holmes a Court: The Australian valued at $363 million in 2019.

Peter Holmes a Court: pops up in the Ridley top 20 with 12.26m shares worth $15 million and also put $1 million into Viostream for 10%, the company which used to host all our Mayne Report videos.

John Holaday: former CEO of Sydney-based QRX Pharmaceutical, whose 7.5m shares were worth close to $20 million at the peak.

Hooker family: Suncorp bought the LJ Hooker real estate business from the Hooker family in 1989. Leslie Joseph Hooker set up the first LJ Hooker office in Sydney, in 1928.



Les and Patricia Holt: listed as owning 4.3m shares in Boom Logistics. The stock peaked at almost $4.80 in April 2006 when they were worth more than $20 million, and bottomed at around 39c.

Dorothea Holtmann and Dr Christian Alexander: top 20 shareholders in Energy World Corporation wi
th about 9m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.40 in May 2008.

Paul Holyoake: former executive chairman and founder of IT services company Oakton and despite earlier selldowns, still owned about 7m shares when the stock peaked at $6.80 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $40 million.

Dick Honan: chairman of the family-owned Manildra, Australia's dominant producer of ethanol. Since 2002, the Honan companies have secured $65 million in ethanol grants. The BRW claimed $367 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $759 million in 2019.

Arthur Hood:
departed as CEO of Lihir Gold in early 2010 and walked away with a $15 million golden handshake, comprising a termination payment of $2.3 million, a $1.3 million cash payment in lieu of rights that would be been awarded under his full-term contract, plus 3.5m shares that were previously awarded and were worth more than $10 million.

Anna Hookway: a shareholder of the Sydney-based fashion brand management company, Oroton Group, she entered into a deed with brothers Robert, Ross and Tom Lane, dated October 21, 2008 which requires them to act co-operatively with each other in relation to the consolidated entity's affairs. At the time the 29.22% stake was worth around $72 million and Anna =Hookway's share $18 million but a decade later it went broke.

Fraser Hopkins: co-founder of the Latina pata brand, who ten years ago sold the Russell Drysdale painting Rocky McCormack for a reported $1.89 million. An astute art collector whose wealth continues to grow.

Jo Horgan: has stores across Australia for her cosmetics lines, Mecca Cosmetica and Kit Cosmetics. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Peter Hosking and Tony D'Antonio: co-owns Global Machinery Co, a company which imports DIY tools and sells them cheaply back in Australia. GMC have managed to enter and survive in the competitive US and UK markets by focusing on innovation. The BRW claimed $270 million in 2010.

Robert Hosking: executive chairman and founder of Mt Martha-based Karoon Gas who owned about 12m shares or 8.38%. The stock bottomed at $1.60 in November 2008 and recovered to more than $7 but is back near $1 in early 2020.

Scott Hosking: a former scrap-metal trader and founding director of Nexus Energy, he was also CFO Karoon Gas with a stake which at one point was valued at almost $100 million thanks to the Poseidon well discovery.

Gil Hoskins: the former managing director of National Mutual made his real fortune in property development and playing the dotcom boom, especially in companies like Sausage Software.

John Houston: former chairman of Sydney-based telecommunications products and services group Nexbis, formally known as Entertainment Media &Telecoms Corp, of which he owns about 61m shares. The stock peaked at almost 50c in August 2008 before falling away.

Sean Howard: BRW dumped the OzEmail founder from its list claiming some of his investments have struggled but we don't buy this, especially given the success of ventures such as Webcentral and Melbourne IT.

Anthony Howland-Rose: former chairman of Sydney-based Allegiance Mining who received $12.82 million with the well-timed sale of his 11.65m shares to Zinifex in 2007.

David Housego: the former Worley Parsons finance director owned 157,582 shares worth $8 million at the peak but sold an additional 116,741 shares in 2006-07 and was earning more than $1 million a year. Later became CFO of Fairfax Media before it was taken over by Nine.

Vincent Hua: Vietnamese migrant who rose to be a top Commonwealth Bank trader pocketing up to $15 million a year until he went missing in action in 2007 before suing the bank for unfair dismissal.

Gabor and Roni Hubay: Roni is the daughter of the late property developer Eddie Kornhauser and the couple sold their Toorak mansion for $15 million in 2013 and own a Melbourne CBD property which recently signed a lease with Beyond Blue.

Huddy family: founded and built Huddy's mining services business, which was sold to Industrea for $146 million. The BRW claims $147 million.

Jay Hughes
: executive director of Perth-based stockbroker Euroz, who owned about 8m shares when the stock peaked at $2.75 in November 2007.

Tim Hughes: Reg Grundy's long-time offsider collected plenty when his production company was sold to Pearsons for $300 million-plus in 1995 and then copped another whack when Macquarie Bank picked up the regional radio empire in 2004. Later ran listed marketing company Photon which went broke.

Dick Humphry: Australia's richest former auditor general made more than $20 million as the CEO who oversaw the demutualisation and float of that lucrative monopoly known as the ASX.

John Hunt: was registered as the owner of 33% of Primo Meats, but his former wife Marie Hunt launched a $50 million court claim for a bigger slice of the empire that was founded by the late Paul Lederer.

Reg Hunt: as well as racing for Maserati alongside Fangio in the 1956 Melbourne Grand Prix, this motoring enthusiast was for two decades Australia's biggest Holden dealer.

Ash Hunter:
owner of the Hunter 5 group of companies which owns Just Magazines Publishing a classifieds listings service for used vehicles and other equipment. Started by his father in 1989, readership grew o more than 200,000 before falling away with most of the print industry.

Ian Huntley: founder of Huntleys' Investment Information and Huntleys' Investment Company, he has provided commentary and recommendations to investors for more than 30 years and enjoyed a tidy pay day selling out to Morningstar.

Sam Hupert: former managing director of the Melbourne-based Pro Medicus, leaders in e-health and digital imaging, who owned about 30m shares. The Australian valued at $860 million in 2019

Hutchinson family: the family founded Hutchinson Builders in 1912 and is now the largest privately owned construction company in Queensland. In 2010 the BRW claims $145 million. The Australian valued at $837 million in 2019.

Hyne family: owns one of Australia's largest timber companies which was established in Queensland 125 years-ago. Generating sales of over $120 million, the company has been mulling a public float or trade sale that could earn them more than $100 million.

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I


Patricia Ilhan: widow of Australia's best known mobile phone salesman, "Crazy John" Ilhan who died from a heart attack in 2007. The BRW claims $317 million but the recent sale to Vodafone sugggests this figure is inflated.

Nick Iloski
: owner and founder of the Glad Group which is one of the fastest-growing cleaning companies in Australia. Glad has risen to an $80 million turnover for 2007-08. A key to their success is the fact that they have secured large retail cleaning contracts in Sydney and then subcontract the work out to other individuals or cleaning companies. An ex-employee has been reported as saying how a majority of the cleaners contracted are foreign nationals who are not only vulnerable, but are also being exploited whilst Iloski's wife drives around in a new Maserati.

Keith Ince
: former County Natwest fund manager who co-founded Portfolio Partners in 1994 and then flogged it to Norwich Union for more than $100 million in 1998.

Inge family: Zig Inge was a homebuilder for many years before he moved into apartments for retirement villages which they family sold off to an unlisted fund, managed by Macquarie Capital Funds, for $641 million in 2007. They have added the historic Rivoli Theatre in the Melbourne suburb of Camberwell to their portfolio for a reported $20.2 million. The BRW claims $435 million. The Australian valued at $707 million in 2019.

Ingham family: known through their poultry meat business, the Sydney-based Inghams hold about 30% of the market. Brothers Bob and Jack Ingham, are also major players in the thoroughbred racing industry until recently selling out to the Dubai royal family. The BRW claims $1.06 billion. Forbes valued at $US640m in March 2010. The Australian valued Bob at $1.01 billion in 2019

Inglis family: have run the thoroughbred auctions in Sydney and Melbourne for years. Their headquarters in Sydney at Randwick is itself on real estate worth more than $100 million.

Bill Ireland: made plenty on paper in Challenger before Kerry Packer flicked him and then repeated the effort through the Mariner group and had all the trapping with the $10 million floating gin palace on Sydney harbour with six full time staff, the dark blue Porsche and the big property in the Southern Highlands. However, recently sold his Mosman mansion as Mariner teetered and the credit crunch hit.

Joe Irvin: Sydney based hotelier who also owns pubs in Queensland. In 2019, bought the Coolangatta Sands Hotel.

Peter Irvine: managing director and co-founder of Gloria Jean's coffee retail outlets. Since obtaining the Australian rights for the business, the chain has grown, generating $85 million in revenue last year.

Jonathan & Candie Italiano: the private investors were reported by The AFR in early 2010 to be selling their Mosman Park mansion in Perth for an asking price of almost $9 million.

Silvio Itescue: former CEO of biotechnology group, Mesoblast, who owned 37m shares or nearly 35%. The stock peaked at almost $2.50 in February 2007 when he was worth more than $70 million.

Peter Ivany: collected $70 million when cinema chain Hoyts was sold to Kerry Packer in 1999 in one of the Big Fella's worst deals. Now a professional investor with a wide range of plays as the new owners of the business he once ran continue to struggle.

J

Hugh Jackman: tripled his yearly salary in 2007 as a film and musical actor, and co-runs Seed, a production company. Jackman owns property in New York, Melbourne and London. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Alan Jackson's family: the late legendary former BTR CEO fell from grace after attempting to punch the Austrim CEO at a Christmas Party in 2002, but the pugnacious former Reserve Bank director did manage to offload more than $20 million worth of Austrim shares for a big profit before the stock tanked.Gabriel Jakob: The child care entrepreneur enjoyed a significant pay day selling down to private equity firm Bain & Co in 2018 and celebrated the windfall by paying $40 million for Steve Harker's Point Piper mansion in 2019.

Edward Jacobson: top 20 shareholder of Carnarvon Petroleum who owns about 14m shares. The stock peaked at almost 80c in June 2008 when he was worth more than $10 million, bottomed at 25c in December 2008 and recovered to around 53c.


Darien Jagger: co-founded boutique investment firm Cygnet Capital in 2003 and paid $16.8 million for a property in the Sydney beachside suburb of Bronte in 2019.

Guy Jalland: former PBL executive who was paid out $6.5 million in 2007/08 but is still making millions each year as CEO of James Packer's private company CPH.

Bill James
: another of the Flight Centre directors that has sold off a lot of his investment. Wrote a guide book on the Kokoda trail. The BRW claimed $378 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $595 million in 2019.

Leigh Jasper: co-founder of Aconex, an international broadband technology company which helps clients to organise and manage information efficiently, especially on major construction jobs. Made BRW Young Rich List and business was taken over by a US giant in 2017.

Richard Jenkins: this chap was never even a main board director of Macquarie Bank but after serving as one of the many internal executive directors for 15 years, his final payout was a handsome $7.4 million, almost all of which was accrued but deferred bonuses.

Jenkins family: former farmers who sold a property in Melbourne's eastern suburbs for almost $100 million in 2018 after it was held by the family for almost 100 years.

Alan Jennings:
pops up in the Sydney-based Gazal Corporation top 20 with about 2.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3 in March 2006 when he was worth more than $7.5 million, bottomed at $1.10 in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.25.

Francis Jennings: director and top 20 shareholder in the Hastie Group who owned about 9.3m shares or 4%. The stock peaked at almost $4.80 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $40 million, but later went broke.

Thomas Jennings:
director and top 20 shareholder in the Hastie Group who owns about 9.3m shares or 4%. The stock peaked at almost $4.80 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $40 million, but later went broke.

Will Jephcott: former deputy chairman of Roc Oil who owns about 1.1m shares and made plenty more as an investment banker working along side Mike Tilley at Lloyds and Centaurus during the 1980s and 1990s. The stock peaked at almost $4.30 in August 2006 when he was worth more than $4 million, bottomed at 50c in December 2008 and recovered to around 67c.

Milan Jerkovic: CEO of Perth-based Straits Resources owns about 4.2m shares. The stock peaked at almost $8.40 in March 2008 when he was worth more than $30 million, bottomed at 70c in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.50.

Adam Johnson:
a director of Innamincka Petroleum who owns about 8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.50 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $10 million, bottomed at 15c in January 2009 and recovered to was around 17c.

David Johnson - Chairman and CEO of Campbell Soup Co from 1990-97 and remained a figurehead leader subsequently, whilst also sitting on the Colgate-Palmolive board.

Gary Johnston: founder of electronics retail company Jaycar who was valued at $397 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $587 million in 2019.

Mark Johnson: co-founded Macquarie Bank with chairman David Clarke and retired from full-time executive duties in 2007, whilst remaining on the board. Owned more than $40 million worth of Macquarie Bank shares in 2010 and would be even richer if he hadn't sold about 800,000 shares for an estimated $30 million over the previous 7 years. Unlike many Macquarie Bankers, didn't retire but instead joined a rival firm in his twilight years after also spending more than a decade as a professional director.

Walter Johnson and family: Walter was formerly the largest shareholder in Futuris, but the Perth-based farmer has now distributed an estimated $160 million stake across 20 different family members.

Stephen Johns: the long-serving Westfield finance boss made more than $30 million from the shopping centre giant and then became a professional director who chaired Brambles and Spark Infrastructure.

Alan Jones: the notorious shock jock is worth more than $50 million after pulling about $4 million a year from his radio gig and investing the proceeds wisely in various property and horse racing plays. Now working for Nine after Macquarie Media takeover in 2019.

Peter Johnston: non-executive director of ASX 300 gold producing and exploration company Silver Lake Resources which operates in Western Australia's Mount Monger and Murchison regions. Held a stake worth almost $10 million in late 2010. Stock still trading in early 2019 at around 60c.

Clive Jones
: managing director of Bannerman Resources, an iron-ore wannabe in the Pilbara, who owns about 12.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4 in February 2008 when he was worth more than $45 million, bottomed at 30c in November 2008 and in January 2010 is back above 70c.

Daniel Jones: former member of band Savage Garden, Jones now runs Meridien Musik, a music production business. Made BRW Young Rich List.

George Jones: non executive chairman of Perth based Gindalbie Metals, who owns about 13m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.90 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $220 million, bottomed at 32c in October 2008 and recovered to around $1. He is also non executive chairman of Perth based Sundance Resources where he owns about 15.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost 85c in June 2007 when he was worth more than $10million, bottomed at 8c in December 2008 and recovered to around 14c.

Greg Jones: the founder of Rams home loans and finance director of Allco, pocketed $45 million from the RAMS float, and also sold a Sydney property in Bellevue Hill for around $10 million.

John Jones: a director of Troy Resources whose stake was worth more than $20 million in late 2010.

Rod Jones: managing director of listed education provider Navitas, formerly known as IBT Education, who owns about 55m shares. The stock bottomed at $1.80 in May 2008 but recovered to around $4.40 valuing his stake at above $220 million. Fast forward to 2019 and he's been trying to privatise Navitas along with a private equity firm run by Ben Gray, but was in dispute with the board. The Australian valued at $437 million in 2019.

Scott Jones:
executive General Manager of Student Recruitment for Navitas, who owns about 2.7m shares which pushes his wealth north of $10 million based on the share price of $4.40.

Robert Jordan: the Australasian managing director of Westfield owns 725,000 shares. The stock peaked at just above $23 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $30 million, and bottomed to around $12.21. He also gets paid more than $4 million a year.

Peter Joseph
: chairman of Perth-based Dominion Mining, who owns about 11m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6.70 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $70 million, bottomed at $2 in November 2008 and recovered to around $3.18.

Peter Joss: beginning his own glass-making business after parting ways with his brother, this business became the basis of his stake in the building-products group McIlwraith-Davey. Since sold, he has ventured into property investment.

Stephen Joyce: a high profile member of the Exclusive Brethren and a director of UBT, the Brethren's Universal Business System which offers such services as coaching and computers (with connection only to the internet through the Brethren's own portal). All of the UBT directors are well off and Joyce owns businesses such as Jaybro, Orange Hire and Cambridge Graphics. Stephen is also the grandson of William Leslie Joyce who owned Mastercraft Chocolates before selling it in January 1961 to Lifesavers for a tidy sum. Stephen was born on December 31, 1961 and is very clever, having also worked hard for what he has. WL Joyce was killed in a 1984 car accident and his successors remain divided based on their involvement with the Brethren.

Judd family: from the Glengallen station near Warwick in Queensland, which around a decade ago purchased 'Ellerby', a Darling Downs property for $3.3 million.

Juniper family
: made their fortune as leading Queensland property developers. Specialising in high-end residential developments, they continue to grow through property including Sea Temple Resorts. The BRW claimed $555 million a decade ago.

Ian & Leigh Junk: the brothers made their fortune in the resources industry in Western Australia. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Paul Jury: a former executive director of NSW-based coal exporter Resource Pacific, who made more than $20 million from the Xstrata takeover at the top of the resources boom.

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Con Kafataris: the former Sydney bookmaker controlled Darwin-based Centrebet International with a holding of 52m shares or 59.74%. The stock peaked at just above $2.80 in May 2007 when he was worth more than $100 million and then the business was sold in 2011 as the UK bookmakers stormed the Australian market.

John Kahlbetzer: agribusiness mogul who owns one Australia's largest property portfolios, Twynam Agricultural Group, with over 400,000 hectares. The BRW claimed $730 million in 2010. The AFR valued him at $1.7 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.20 billion in 2019.

Kailis family: Michael and Patricia were pioneers in the lobster industry in WA, which founded the family's fortune. The business has expanded into pearl farming, combining fishing and fashion. In 2010 the BRW claimed $168 million.

Anthony Kaiser: founder of Melbourne-based hedge fund, the Kaiser Fund which was listed with more than $1 billion under management.

John Kaldor: pioneered Macquarie Bank's push into infrastructure, this Sydneysider donated an art collection worth more than $35 million to the Art Gallery of NSW and the National Gallery of Australia, so he is clearly worth plenty.

Steven Kalmin: former Chief Financial Officer of Glencore PLC. Was valued at $479 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $425 million in 2019.

Leon Kamenev: The Australian valued at $583 million in 2019.

Kantor family: her brother, Rupert Murdoch, bought Anne Kantor out of the family company Cruden Investments for about $200 million in the 1990s. Charitable and philanthropic, the Kantor family have a strong interest in the arts scene in Melbourne, plus funded The Climate Institute. The BRW claimed $355 million in 2010.

Anthony Karam: managing director of TMA Group, formerly Mark Sensing Ltd, owns about 947m shares. In 2010 when the price per share was 3c, his wealth was north of $25 million.

Theo Karedis: he made his fortune through the buy out of the Theo's Liquor retail chain by Coles Myer for more than $200 million. The BRW claimed $338 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.15 billion in 2019.

Karidis family: founder of the largest property development and investment businesses in South Australia, Karidis Corporation, which has interests in retirement living accommodation, car parking, residential and commercial properties. In the past 50 years they built more than 5,000 structures and are estimated to be worth around $300 million.

Melissa Karlson: daughter of the late Perth-based billionaire Bill Wyllie who is responsible for the Wyllie Group's extensive national investment portfolio.

Nonda Katsalidis: Melbourne architect and also had a one-third interest in the giant Eureka Tower.

Peter Kazacos: founder of Australia's then largest IT outsourcer, Kaz Computer Services, which was eventually taken over by Telstra.

John Kearney's family: the former QC died in 2013, after which his family sold the Block Arcade for more than $100 million. He also owned largely rural property holdings near the Gold Coast.


Keighran: a technology whiz-kid who was writing software programs at 10 years of age. He was the founder of IT company Bluepulse and is worth more than $25 million.

Chris Kelaher: former managing director of of Australian Wealth Management, which merged with IOOF Holdings in April 2009. The AWM stock peaked at almost $3.10 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $50 million. Had a tough Royal Commission and resigned as IOOF CEO in 2019.

Andrew Kelly: began selling car radios at local markets, he opened the first of many Strathfield Car Radio stores in 1980. He lost heavily in the dotcom crash, but has hung onto a residual fortune.

Gail Kelly: former CEO of Westpac who owned about 1.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $31 in December 2007 when she was worth more than $45 million.

Andrew Kemeny:
sold his house in Vaucluse to Socceroo Luke Wilkshire, who paid $6.3m. Hails from the liquor retailing family.

Russell Kempnich
: founder and chairman of Queensland-based Sedgman, a leading provider of multi-disciplinary engineering, project delivery and operations services to the global resources industry, who owned 19.4m shares whenwe looked. The stock peaked at almost $4.20 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $70 million, bottomed at 50c in January 2009 and later recovered.

David Kenley: former CEO of booming medical company Polynovo who has had a long and successful career developing medical technology.

Kennard family: from humble beginnings, patriarch Walter built Kennards Hire into one of Australia's largest and most respected hire companies, with over 60 branches across Australia. Teamed up in 1994 with Valad Property Group in a deal worth $215 million, acquiring 24 properties under the Miller's Self Storage brand. The family later bought back the portfolio, suggesting they are seriously wealthy.

Brian Kennedy: non-executive director of ASX 300 gold producing and exploration company Silver Lake Resources which operates in Western Australia's Mount Monger and Murchison regions. Held a stake worth almost $10 million in late 2010.

Andrew Kent: chairman of Perth-based Aspermont, who owned about 110m shares in 2010. The stock peaked at almost 55c in January 2008 when he was worth more than $55 million, and bottomed at around 13c.

George Kepper: made his fortune when he sold a 51% stake in the networking equipment business he founded, Datacraft, in the 1990s. The BRW claims $231 million. The Australian valued at $551 million in 2019.

Miranda Kerr: Sydney model best known for her work with Victoria's Secret. Estimated net worth exceeds $20m.

Owen Kerr: co-founder of exchange broker Pepperstone. Was valued at $538 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $416 million in 2019.

Larry Kestelman: The Australian valued at $605 million in 2019. Property developer and internet pioneer who has been dropping $15 million a year on the NBL.

Harry Kewell: arguably Australia's best-known soccer player of his generation who has made tens of millions playing in the English Premier League for the likes of Leeds and Liverpool. In 2009 he earned $9.5 million with Turkish club Galatasaray. The BRW claimed $54 million in 2010.



Robin Khuda:
the founder of Macquarie-backed data centres company AirTrunk is worth more than $300 million and splashed around $40 million on Sydney properties in recent years.

Kidman family: an empire started by Sir Sidney Kidman more the 100 years ago. This pastoral giant's land equated to about 4% of Australia's land mass at the peak.

Nicole Kidman: a well-known Hollywood actress who also heads production company Blossom Films, and earns close to $20 million a film. The BRW claimed $289 million in 2010. Contributed 500k to bushfire relief. The Australian valued at $393 million in 2019.

Michael Kiernan: the former trucker turned mining entrepreneur built up significant value in Territory Resources but then lost plenty when Monarch Gold fell over.

Thomas Sie Po Kiing: he joined the board of Melbourne IT in 2002 and owned more than 5m shares. The stock peaked at just above $4.20 in June 2007 when they were worth more than $20 million, before falling away.

Heather Killen - Jim Killen's daughter is a former AFR journalist who rose to become a vice-president of Yahoo! during the dotcom boom and was then managing partner of Hemisphere Capital, a London-based boutique firm providing capital, funding and connections to IT and digital media-related firms. Was also a director of ITV and used to work for Salomon Brothers in New York.

Craig Kimberley: the Just Jeans founder sold his business way too cheaply to private equity in 2001, but he's still worth plenty.

David King: former director of Eastern Star Gas who owned about 20.4m shares. The stock bottomed at 20c in October 2008 but was taken over by Santos at almost $1 a share.

Grant King: former CEO of Origin Energy who earnt more than $4 million a year during his long tenure and owned more than 300,000 shares.

John Kinghorn: founder of the failed Allco Finance Group but his major play was building mortgage originator Rams Home Loans which he floated just before the global credit crisis, pocketing more than $600 million. The BRW claimed $536 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $401 million in 2019.

David Kingston: the former Rothschilds investment banker is estimated by colleagues to be worth about $150 million in his new life as a publican, media investor, shareholder activist and professional director.

Kirby family: from humble beginnings of an inner-city motorcycle workshop, Sir James Kirby turned the business into a significant manufacturing enterprise, which has since been sold. Today, the family has many diversified interests, including heavy investment in the Hungerford Hill winery in NSW. The BRW claimed $223 million in 2010.

John Kirby: controls about 15% of Village Roadshow but has been in dispute with his brother Robert Kirby.

Robert Kirby: the outgoing executive chairman of Village Roadshow personally controls about 15% of the company.

Greg Kirk: former CEO of the financial planning division of Challenger Financial Services, he pocketed $3.6 million in the last year which included a short term bonus of $3 million. This was awarded for his contribution to the sale of the CFS financial planning division.

Ross Smyth-Kirk: chairman of mining company Kingsgate whose stake was worth more than $50 million in late 2010.

Robert Kirkby: departed BHP-Billiton in December 2006 with a very handy 770,000 shares. The stock peaked at almost $49 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $37 million, bottomed at $21 in December 2008 and recovered to around $40.

Jacob Klein: former managing director of Sydney-based Sino Gold, which was fully acquired by Canadian gold miner Eldorado Gold in 2009. Now heads up Evolution Mining which has been a profitable play too.

Jurgen Klein: using a combination of science and horticulture he successfully created the cosmetics company of Jurlique International, which was backed by Kerry Packer for a while but then ran into big problems with the ACCC.

Marius Kloppers: the South African who rose to become CEO of BHP-Billiton was on a salary package of more than $7 million a year and exited with more than $10 million worth of shares. Lives a quiet life in Melbourne on a very tidy BHP pension which dates back to his time at Billiton.

Steve Kloss: former CEO of Melbourne-based Pentana Solutions, which also owns carservice.com.au, which specialises in the supply and development of automotive computer systems tailored to Asia Pacific dealerships. He also once owned about 2.4m shares in carsales.com.au worth more than $30 million if still retained.

David Knappick: former chief financial officer of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company which was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009. He benefited greatly from the sale and in 2010 the BRW claims $234 million.

Knowles family: held a substantial portfolio of retirement properties which was sold to the Stockland Group in 2007 for $389 million. The BRW claims $452 million.

Ruslan Kogan: Founder, entrepreneur and CEO of kogan.com, a portfolio of retail and service businesses, paid $38 million for a Toorak pad in 2019.

Paul Kopejtka: former executive chairman of Perth-based Murchison Metals who owned about 20.7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $120 million but subsequently went south.

Peter Kotzias: a developer in Sydney's eastern suburbs who listed his four bedroom harbourfront penthouse in Rose Bay to sell for $6.5 million in mid-2010.

Kornhauser family: HSP Property Group is a private company of this family that has strong interests in Queensland courtesy of the late Eddie Kornhauser's pioneering high-rise property developments on the Gold Coast in the 1970s. The BRW claims $336 million.

George Koukis: chairman of the Temenos Group which sells banking software, with an annual salary of $1.3 million and nearly 2.5m shares, his wealth is north of $250 million. The BRW claimed $289 million in 2010.

Sam Kurtz: owns at least 25 retail properties ranging from Mornington to Malvern.

Lionel Krongold - former owner of KH Stramit Limited, one of Australia's largest steel manufacturing companies, and now executive chairman of the Krongold Group of Companies, a privately owned Melbourne based Investment Company. Lionel is a current member of the Epworth Hospital Medical Foundation, a past director of the Essendon Football Club and has served on the boards of various companies both private and public.

Ted Kunkel: the former Foster's CEO retired in 2005 with a $3.4 million termination benefit and super, holiday pay and long service totalling more than $12 million after spending his career with the company. Now pursues private developments and was also chair of Billabong International and a director of Visy Industries.

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Lee LaFrate: energetic stockbroker and racing enthusiast who collected more than $20 million from the sale of his 1.868m shares in the Melbourne-based fund manager, Treasury Group.

Laidlaw family: Australia's oldest manufacturer of work wear, Yakka was owned by this Melbourne family until it was sold to Pacific Brands for $280 million in 2007. Would be worth half that today. The BRW claims $280 million.

Lamb family: owning the Australian rights to technology that allows advertisement tracking, continues a history of media investment. The Lamb family once owned Sydney's 2UE and Brisbane's 4BC, along with regional television stations in Newcastle and Adelaide.

Rodney Lamb
: former executive director of Queensland-based Sedgman, a leading provider of multi-disciplinary engineering, project delivery and operations services to the global resources industry, who owns about 15.2m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.20 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million, bottomed at 50c in January 2009 and in recovered to around $1.41.

Barry Lambert: executive chairman of Count Financial and owns about 90m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3.50 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $270 million, bottomed at 95c in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.39. Retired as a non-executive director in 2006. The BRW claims $211 million. The Australian valued at $342 million in 2019.

Lane family: the four siblings - together owned 29% of Sydney-based fashion label Oroton which was worth close to $100 million at the peak but ended up going broke.

John Langley: the son of Gina Rinehart has an MBA but has been in dispute with his mother for many years.

Nick Langley and Lorraine Tarabay: Nick was the founder of fund manager Rare Infrastructure and Lorraine is the new chair of Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art. They live in Point Piper and sold their Whale Beach weekender for $7 million in 2020.

Stewart Langton: founder and now general manager of the online wine auction business, Langton's, agreed to sell to Woolworths thus expanding their Dan Murphy's retail liquor business. He founded the business in 1998 with Mark Robinson and rejected many offers for a buyout, but sold to Woollies for a reported $13 million.

Peter Lansom: executive director of Eastern Star Gas who owned about 7.5m shares and benefited from the 90c Santos takeover bid in 2011.

Peter Larsen: education industry veteran who was a director of listed education provider Navitas, formerly known as IBT Education, which was taken over in 2019. He owns about 31m shares at the peak. In 2010 the BRW claims $155 million.

Greg Lasrado: former internet porn-king who amassed a modest property portfolio in Brisbane and was also a donor to the ALP.


Joseph and Tony Lattouf: the brothers started their first hair dressing salon in Doncaster in 1987 and now control Hairhouse Warehouse, Australia's biggest hair and beauty franchise with over 150 outlets.


Leon Lau: the founder of recruitment company People Bank he owned about 15m shares. He also once owned a stake in Village Roadshow worth more than $30 million.

Arthur Laundy: owner of over 60 pubs and hotels across NSW. Was valued at $584 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $833 million in 2019.

John Laws: making $5 million a year through shock jockery and endorsements for a decade is handy, but the now-retired Golden Tonsils is also a very smart property investor who has amassed a large, growing and valuable portfolio over the years.

Leo Lazzolino: founder and CEO of Elite Property Group which operates in Melbourne's south east. Donated $100,000 to the Victorian Liberals in 2018-19.

Paul Leaming:
a former CFO of AMP and alumni of Macquarie, he pops up on the Macquarie share register as the owner of 109,034 shares valued at around $13 million in mid-2020. Also a racing enthusiast as he spent several years on the board of the Newcastle Jockey Club.

John Leaper: the Chairman of TLC Aged Care since 1995, and along with his wife Jenny, they have become one of the most successful providers of Residential Aged Care in Victoria. Formerly John was President of the Aged Care Association of Victoria and Vice President of the federal body for several years.

Paul Lederer: the son of Primo Meats founder Andrew Lederer who has stepped up to become a major supplier to Coles. The BRW claimed $225 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.23 billion in 2019

Yenda Lee & Family: Australian-Chinese Chairman of ‘Bing Lee' who was valued at $334 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $526 million in 2019.

Trevor Lee: runs the ACC Group and supplies a large amount of Coles beef, The Australian valued at $748 million in 2019.

Christopher Lee: one of the founders of accounting software group MYOB who has made a small fortune out of its success over the years and was able to retire in April 2007.

Dr Patrick Lee: this Queensland doctor from Caboolture has a portfolio of property and shares worth more than $20 million.

Deborah Lei: owner of the East West Group of companies which has several major developments around Ipswich, Queensland. She is also involved in international trade and investment consultation and is Ipswich City Council's honorary business ambassador to China. A financial contributor to the ALP, she has used her political connections to promote her cause.

Isi Leibler
: from humble beginnings in a shop in the Melbourne suburb of Sunshine, he built Jetset Tours group into large business which he sold to Air New Zealand in 1997.

Rod Leissle and John Tyrrell: behind the phenomenal ABBA tribute band Bjorn Again which now has 5 franchises playing at any one time around the globe.

Dudley Leitch
: managing director of Kings Minerals, involved in the exploration and development of gold, silver, and base metals in Mexico and Australia, who owned about 38m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.10 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $30 million, bottomed at 6c in December 2008 and recovered to around 18c.

Niall Lenehan: the former finance director of Kingsgate Consolidated, Goldfields and AurionGold has hit real pay dirt since joining African coal miner Riversdale Mining. He owns about 3m shares. The stock peaked at almost $12 in July 2008, bottomed at $1.80 in December 2008 and had recovered to around $7.47 valuing his stake north of $20 million.

Anthony Lennon: executive director and chairman of Peet Ltd property developers with around 70m shares. In 2008 he purchased a property in up-market Toorak for $7 million so he can demolish it to make way for his tennis court. The BRW claims $325 million but the recent gas scandal in one Melbourne development and the broader property crash has sent the share price tumbling. The stock peaked at almost $4.50 in November 2006 when he was worth more than $300 million, bottomed at $1.40 in December 2008 and recovered to around $2.10.

Peter Leonhardt: chairman of Carnarvon Petroleum who owns about 28m shares. The stock peaked at almost 80c in June 2008 when he was worth more than $20 million, bottomed at 25c in December 2008 and recovered to around 53c.

Peter Lester: the former Oxiana Resources corporate general manager owned 1.3m shares which were worth more than $2 million when the stock peaked at around $4 in mid-2007, before his wealth plunged after the ill-fated merger with Zinifex to create Oz Minerals just as the resources bubble was bursting.

Stephen Leung
: private investor and part-time property developer, he sold the Australian Natives Association building in Elizabeth Street Melbourne last year for a reported $9.6 million.

Richard Leupen
: the managing director of engineering and facilities management company United Group has a share wealth of more than $30 million after a 2008 near margin call forced a major sell-down.

Michelle Levine
: the CEO of Roy Morgan Research who owns 10% of the profitable research business and is also a director of both Haoma Mining and Kitchener Mining, which have been a financial black hole over the years.

Robin Levison: managing director and CEO of Queensland-based mining products and services group Industrea, owns about 14.8m shares which alone puts his wealth close to $10 million in March 2010.

Solomon Lew: a billionaire retail investor with the Midas touch, Solly has made big money over the years in everything from Coles Myer, Witchery, Nine West, Just Group, Housewares International and Colorado. Recently bought control of Just Group. The 2010 BRW claims $1.49billion. Forbes valued at $US1bn in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $2.028 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $2.03 billion in 2019

Alex Lewenberg: The prominent criminal lawyer sold his family home and firm's offices along with the neighbouring buildings located in Melbourne's CBD on the corner of Queens and Little Lonsdale street for $26 million in 2018.

Lewis family: the Sydney family's wealth has been built by the Lewis Land property group which has strong interests all over Australia. The BRW claimed $600 million in 2010.

Geoff Lewis: co-founder and managing director of Perth-based IT out-sourcing company ASG Group. He owns about 14.7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $2 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $25 million, bottomed at 40c in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.29.

Justin Lewis: the former head of strategy at Allco Finance Group owned 1.04 million shares that peaked in value at $13.5m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.


Bill Lewski: Max Green's former business partner made a nice comeback in the retirement industry and deals with Babcock & Brown Communities delivered him almost $100 million, although his old empire is now run by Lend Lease and he cost investors hundreds of millions and was charged by ASIC.

Liberman family: smart investment strategies and excellent timing have built the family's multi-billion dollar fortune, which began in Melbourne after the arrival of Jack Liberman who fled Poland as a holocaust survivor. The BRW claims $2.2 billion.

David Liddy
: the former Bank of Queensland CEO owned 1.6m shares worth $30m when the stock peaked at $19.50 in October 2007.

Junhui and Shangjin Lin: The Australian valued at $845 million in 2019. Chinese gold miner behind the Kingland Gold business who The AFR recently reported had agreed to pay $95 million in two years from now for two water front apartments in Point Piper.

Allen Linz: born in South Africa, he made his wealth acquiring prominent Sydney property with his Melbourne-based Eco-Villages Australia.

Ye Lipei: Shanghai born property developer. He was valued at $2.05 billion by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.57 billion in 2019

Paul Little: he part-purchased Toll Holdings for just $1.5 million in 1986, built it with a series of takeovers and then sold it to Japan Post 30 years later before turning his hand to property development. The AFR valued him at $1.77 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.32 billion in 2019

Eduard Litver: part-owner of Eco-Villages Australia Pty Ltd, a rapidly expanding property development company.

Andrew Liveris: Darwin-born and Brisbane-raised lad who rose to be CEO of Dow Chemical and also sat on the Citigroup board.

Warren Livingstone: the founder of the Fanatics paid $17 million for the Captain Cook Hotel in Botany in early 2020, adding to his two other Sydney pokies pubs, the Charing Cross Hotel n Waverley and the Hyde Park Hotel in Darlinghurst.

Mark Lochtenberg: former managing director of Cockatoo Coal who owned 37.5m shares worth $37m when the stock peaked at $1.20 in May 2008 before taking a dive.

John Longhurst: majority shareholder in the south east Queensland shopping mall giant, the Hyperdome. A shrewd investor, in 1974 he purchased an 85 hectare site in Coomera, the site of the Dreamworld theme park, which he sold in 1989. The BRW claimed $415 million in 2010.

Luc Longley: retired from basketball in 2001, after 11 seasons in the NBA, including a number of Chicago Bulls premierships playing along side Michael Jordon. Longley now stands up for environmental causes across Australia.

Geoffrey Lord
: John Elliott's former right hand man who got out of Elders with a tidy pile and now has an extensive empire through his Belgravia Group which over the years has included businesses such as formal wear, corporate apparel, gym equipment, fitness centre management and taxis.

Peter Lord: former non-executive director of Clive Peeters electrical discount chain who owned 41.6 million shares which were worth around $140 million when the stock peaked at $3.50 in May 2007 but it subsequently went broke.

Andrew Love: has been making plenty for years as a partner at insolvency firm Ferrier Hodgson but also owned 345,000 shares in booming African coal miner Riversdale Mining and had in-the-money options over a further 550,000 shares which together delivered him about $8 million on paper thanks to the ill-fated $16.50 a share Rio Tinto takeover bid in 2011.

John Love:
the former head of shipping at Allco Finance Group owned 2.75 million that peaked in value at $35.7m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.


Frank Lowy: born in Czechoslovakia, Frank had his first taste of retailing working in his mother's grocery store. He arrived in Sydney in 1952 with a small suitcase, little English and no money. Driving a delivery truck, he saved enough money to open a small delicatessen in outer-suburban Blacktown with friend John Saunders. This business was the humble beginnings of the shopping centre giant Westfield. The 2010 BRW claimed $5 billion. The Australian valued him at $8.916 billion in 2019.


Alistair Lucas family: lost the power struggle to run Macquarie Bank's investment banking division to rival Nicholas Moore but still made tens of millions from his long service in the Millionaire Factory's Melbourne office and did just as well at Goldman Sachs-JB Were for several years before tragically passing away in the prime of his life.

Chris Lucas: made his pile selling The Botanical Hotel in Melbourne for $16 million to the failed Cornerstone Group in 2007 and owns a Toorak mansion in St Georges Road said to be worth close to $20 million.

Baz Luhrmann: has become one of Australia's leading film directors responsible for Strickly Ballroom, Romeo and Juliet, Moulin Rouge!, and the recent epic Australia.

Andrew Lukas: former boss of AJ Lucas Group, an Australian leader in horizontal directional drilling for the resources industry, who owned 6.2m shares worth more than $40m when the stock peaked at almost $7 in June 2008. It's been a shocker for shareholders ever since.

Charlie & Grace Lund: these pastoralists are Queensland-based and their operations centre around cattle. They appeared on 2008 Queensland Rich List which claimed they were worth well over $100 million.

Michael Luscombe's family: the former Woolworths CEO died in 2018. Ran Woolworths for 5 years clocking up about $20 million in salary and owned almost 500,000 shares worth almost $20 million.

Iris Lustig: daughter of the late Ted Lustig who developed Melbourne properties such as Box Hill Central shopping centre, The Park Hyatt and The Grand Hyatt. The BRW claims $379 million in 2010.

Chris Lynch: quit as BHP-Billiton finance director on $4.6 million a year after missing out on the top job and then ran Transurban for a few years whilst still owning more than $15 million worth of BHP shares.

Mark Lynch: former managing director and CEO of Citigold Corporation who together with John Lynch had a share wealth that peaked at more than $100 million in 2007-08.

Lyons family: the assets are tied up in an estate but the direct shareholding in Tattersall's at the time of the float was worth almost $80 million and tens of millions have been distributed from poker machine profits over the past 20 years.

Darryn Lyons: the wild man from Geelong began his photographic career with the Geelong Advertiser. He moved to London and established his business, Big Pictures, which was one the world's biggest celebrity photo agencies. Was a terrible mayor of Geelong.

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Sherman Ma: the litigious founder of Liberty Financial, which for a while had the biggest slice of the low-doc loans market in Australia. Failed to get a float away in 2007 with a lofty $700 million valuation before the GFC smashed the segment. In 2010 the BRW claimed $104 million.

Peter MacGregor:
the former planning lawyer delivered the $200 million Queensland residential property development Seaspray on the Capricorn coast.

Chris Mackay: the former boss of UBS in Australia rode the credit boom nicely and then made a fortune as chairman of fund manager Magellan Financial Group. The Australian valued at $735 million in 2019.

David Mackay:- born in Hamilton, New Zealand, he studied business at Charles Stuart University and joined Kellogg Australia as group product manager in 1985. He left to become managing director of Sara Lee in Australia, but returned to Kellogg in 1998 as managing director, Kellogg Australia before landing the top global gig at Kelloggs.

Adrian MacKenzie: former Australian head of private equity firm CVC, which lost more than $1 billion on PBL Media. In 2008 he purchased a substantial parcel of land in the Southern Highlands for a reported $5 million.

Dennis Mackenzie: former managing director of CSG, an information, communications and technology business that began in 1988 as a Xerox business centre based in Darwin, who owns about 51m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.90 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $90 million, bottomed at 45c in January 2009 and then recovered. In 2010 the BRW claims $128 million.

Mackinnon family: having owned the prized 2630 ha Kaladbro Estate property in Western Victoria for 150 years, a $25 million offer from Qatar-based Hassad Food proved too tempting in early 2010.

Hugh Maclachlan: he heads Australia's largest privately owned rural property group with 4.7 million hectares and is Australia's largest wool producer. The BRW claimed $247 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $437 million in 2019.

Penny Maclagan: a former maths teacher, she joined Computershare, which was founded by her brother Chris Morris and served many years as a director and large investor with about about 16m shares.

Bruce Maclaren: owner of Brisbane Steel Fabrications who has built up a solid property portfolio as well.

Elle Macpherson: once known globally as 'The Body' and an archetypal supermodel, she has continued to grow her wealth through her business nous and the establishment of retail lingerie giant Bendon.

John Mactaggert: Technology One director and foundation investor who owned about 67m shares at the peak. Stock has boomed to record highs of more than $9 in 2019-20.

Ross McDiven: sold his Multiplex shares for about $5 million to Canadian firm Brookfield in the 2007 takeover and was paid many millions more as an executive before and after the takeover.

Magid family: Ambitious Property Developments generated much of this Melbourne family's wealth. Developing Esso house in Sydney into apartments, and Fountain Gate shopping centre in Melbourne are two of their bigger plays. The BRW claimed $393 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $580 million in 2019.

Nathan Mahalingam: managing director of Perth-based Mission Biofuels, who owned 24.6m shares worth around $30 million when the stock peaked at $1.80 in May 2007 before tumbling during the GFC.

Con and Ross Makris: a big player in the Adelaide property market, establishing the Makris Group. Owning an array of office bulidings and shopping centres in an around Adelaide. The 2010 BRW claims $1.02 billion. The Australian valued Con at $1.03 billion in 2019

Michael Malone: the founder and former CEO of Perth-based IiNet, Australia's third biggest ISP after Telstra and Optus, who at one point owned 50m shares in the company and benefitted from the TPG takeover bid at close to $9 a share in 2015.

Kevin Maloney: former executive chairman of MAC Services Group, suppliers of accommodation services to industry, who owned 86.6m shares worth $330 million when the stock was taken over at $3.90 a share by a US firm in 2010. The BRW claimed $276 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $557 million in 2019.

Kim and Cyril Maloney: Sydney hoteliers who have benefited from the pokies and own a string of CBD properties. The BRW claimed $422 million in 2010.

Ian Malouf: The Australian valued at $550 million in 2019.

Roy Manassen: another food king, his Manassen Foods Australia is one of Australia's biggest food importers and wholesalers distributing 85 brands nationally including iconic brands such as Twinings Tea, Carrs Crackers and Trident Sauces. Owns a $15 million house in Mosman. In 2010 the BRW claims $224 million.

Mantello family: Old man Albert was a legendary North Melbourne ruckman but his sons now run the successful development business which has included the excellent Sandhurst golf course estate in Melbourne's south east.

Grahame Mapp
: known as an "accumulator of wealth", a shrewd investor with the majority of his wealth in shares. The BRW claims $415 million. The Australian valued at $512 million in 2019.

Marchant family:
large land holder with substantial cotton and horse breeding interests based around Goondiwindi in Queensland.
Rob Marich:
A Sydney-based former member of the Macquarie empire who still owns a stake in the bank worth about $7 million in 2020.

David Mariner: was responsible for the re-development of the historic Regent Theatre in Melbourne. This property developer has a diverse property portfolio with The Mariner Group, but arguably should have gone broke in the 1990s but for the generosity of the Commonwealth Bank.

Peter Marriott: the long-time ANZ executive and chief financial officer made more than $20 million from his time at ANZ and is now on the Westpac board.

Gordon Martin and family: owned lucrative Coogee Chemicals and former chancellor of Perth's Curtin University. The BRW claimed $452 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $593 million in 2019.

John Martin: former managing director of Standard Chartered Bank in London. Brisbane-school energy banker who did 26 years with ABN Amro and represents the British oil industry on the World Petroleum Council.Peter Martin: chairman of listed EML payments who owns more than 7 million shares worth around $20 million. A former senior banker at Rothschild Australia.

Mitchel Martin-Weber: owner of Inenco, the holding company for Australia's leading bearing, power transmission, driveline and hose, fasteners and sealing componentry supplier.

Domenic Martino: former chairman of Clive Palmer's iron ore hopeful Australasian Resources who owns 11.5 million options exercisable at $1.18. When the stock peaked he was worth than $10 million. Was the CEO of Deloittes forced out after the dotcom boom after a series of Walkley Award-winning reports by The Australian's Geoff Elliott.

Peter Mason: former chairman of AMP and David Jones and one of the original "Fab Four" who built and profited nicely from the sale of Ord Minnett to what is now owned by JP Morgan.

Roger Massy-Greene: the former chairman and major shareholder of Excel Coal before it was taken over in 2007.

Michael Masterman: the CEO of ASX-listed Po Valley Energy who owned about 26m shares in the company which aspires to find gas in Italy. A great mate of Andrew Forrest through their ill-fated time at Anaconda Nickel together.

Kerrie Mather: the long time Macquarie Airports CEO who made more than $20 million, primarily from the great success that was Sydney Airport.

Phil Mathews: a Sydney investor whose fund was a big resources punter. Was a substantial share holder is Santos, Nexus Energy, Arrow energy and also owned more than 10% of Renison. Also cleaned up to the tune of $100 million by punting in gaming technologies giant Aristocrat.

Richard Mathews: the former chief executive of mining IT firm Mincom collected $26.8 million when it was sold to a US private equity firm for $315 million in 2007.

Bruce Mathieson: born into a farming family, he left school when he was 13 to become a toolmaker. At 31, he purchased his first hotel after being refused accommodation in a pub because he had children. This billionaire former business partner of Alan Bond now manages Australia's biggest pubs and pokies empire for majority shareholder Woolworths. The 2010 BRW claims $1 billion. Forbes valued at $US680m in March 2010. The Australian valued at $1.18 billion in 2019

Don Mathieson:
benefited to the tune of $175 million from the sale of Melbourne-based glass processing company Don Mathieson & Staff Glass Glass to CSR in 2008. He is the younger brother of pokies king Bruce Mathieson. Very unusual to have two brothers who started with nothing become independently successful in business.

Christina & Richard Matta: own Perfume Empire, a perfume brand and a pharmacy chain. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Peter Mattick
: co-founder of Salmat, Australia's largest company specialising in management of call centres, mailing of bank statements, advertising material and catalogues. He owned 36m shares when the stock peaked at $5.20 in August 2007. The BRW claimed $280 million in 2010.

Peter Mavridis: after working in the US for two years, Mavridis noticed a gap in the Australian market for purely information technology firms, and moved back to start business S Central. The company boasts clients Telstra, Priceline and ANZ. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Mcalary family: the late Frank Mcalary was formerly a Queen's counsel who owned parcels of rural land in WA and NSW. As a large shareholder in Felix Resources, he was paid handsomely when they were purchased by Yanzhou Coal. In 2010 the BRW claims $184 million.

Jay McAlister: owns Imoda Group, which splits into Vantage Property Group, a construction and property development company, and Gallery Group, an advertising agency. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Bill McCartney: pocketed $15 million when Orica bought the food chemical business he ran, Bronson & Jacobs, for $110 million in 2004 but then had to pay $2.3 million in 2010 after a court found he breached his non-compete agreement by helping two former employees set up a new competitor.

Malcolm McCusker: a well-known Perth legal family with a large share portfolio.

Jarrod McCracken: a former rugby league player who made plenty swtiching sides during the Super League wars, McCracken now owns property development company Crackers Corporation. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Paul McCullagh: founding managing director of successful private equity firm PEP who originally hailed from Ireland and sits on boards such as Emeco and share registry firm Link. Has been active in Australia since 1986 as head of Prudential Securities and later Salomon Bros, all gigs which paid exceptionally well.

McDonald family: owning around 170,000 cattle spread over 11 properties totaling 3.4 million hectares in rural Queensland. The BRW claims $209 million.

Dean McEvoy: the 32 year old founder of online buying group Spreets who owned 42% when it was sold in early 2011 to Yahoo7 for $40 million.

John McFarlane: the former ANZ chief executive has made more than $50 million over his term running the Melbourne-based bank for almost a decade, but left behind quite a mess with Opes Prime and has now sold down to own just 100,000 shares.

Lional McFadyen
: his salary for the previous two years, as executive director of Bell Potter Securites, was more than $3 million. He also retains a handy stake in the now listed Bell Financial Group.

Stuart McGill - former CEO of ESSO Australia who rose to become number three in the giant Dallas-based Exxon-Mobil Corporation - president of ExxonMobil Gas Marketing - before retiring after 38 years of service in July 2007.

Jeffery McGlinn: former managing director of NRW Holdings, who once owned 22.8 million shares before the GFC when the stock peaked at almost $3.50 in November 2007.

Sean McGould: the chief investment officer of Lighthouse Investment Partners, he has a shareholding in HFA Holdings. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in July 2007, bottomed at 12c in December 2008 and in March 2010 was around 25c when they were worth more than $16 million.

Gerry McGowan: former Impulse Airlines CEO who is now on the board of CBD Energy which owns a wind farm on King Island and recently received a government grant of $20 million to assist development of $360 million solar energy farm which McGowan boasts will create a $400 million export market.

Adrian McGrath: the Hunters Hill resident in Sydney owned about 10.6m shares in car dealer Automotive Holdings Group which were more than $40 million when the stock peaked at almost $4.50 in July 2007.

John McGrath: made his original pile through his own real estate firm in Sydney but his best little earner of late has been 2m shares in the News Ltd-controlled realestate.com.au, although he lost much of his fortune as a huge gambler.

Brian McGuigan: the founder of McGuigan Simeon Wines, now called Australian Vintage, still owned a stake worth about $20 million despite the business struggling at times.

Eddie McGuire: collected $4.7 million from PBL in 2005-06 and $4.2 million in 2006-07 despite getting flicked as CEO and signing a new lucrative 4-year contract on the same rate to do not very much.

McHugh family: Sydney publicans who took on too much debt during the days of easy credit and in early 2010 were forced to sell the Kinselas Hotel at Darlinghurst for $12 million to a group led by John Singleton and Mark Carnegie.

Dick McIlwain
: the former Tatts Group CEO enjoyed a $15 million-plus pay day when the business merged with Unitab in 2006 but also then chaired Super Cheap Auto and Wotif.com, where he made a few million more.

Mark McInnes: the former David Jones CEO enjoyed a pay packet of more than $5 million a year before getting sacked over a sexual harassment claim. Still making plenty today as Solly Lew's CEO of Premier Investments.

Peter McIntyre: former managing director of Perth-based uranium explorer Extract Resources, who owns 4.4m shares worth more than $30 million when the stock cracked $8 after the GFC before falling away.

Kerry Hermanis: The Australian valued at $618 million in 2019.

Andrew Mckenzie: former managing director of WA based Euroz, who owns about 8.5m shares worth more than $20m when the stock peaked at $2.75 in November 2007.

Brett McKeon: founding director of Australian Financial Group who made more than $20m out of the business.

Steve McKnight: a former accountant who began his property investment foray ten years ago. Three and a half years later he owned 130 properties, had quit his day job and was earning in excess of $200 000 a year. He has also written From 0 to 130 Properties in 3.5 Years, which has sold 160,000-plus copies to date across Australia and internationally. Had also funded some anti-gambling campaigning which is excellent.

Don McLay: long time director of Credit Corp who owned 1.17m shares worth $40 million when the stock pushed through $34 after a strong half year result was released in January 2020.

Hugh McLernon: the Perth-based lawyer and executive director of litigation fund IMF owns about 10.6m shares worth about $17 million and made plenty from earlier plays with Danny Hill and AMP.

David & Maxine McMahon: big investment in Fone Zone, a phone retailer which has struggled to compete with Telstra. The couple also have a large portfolio of investments in Queensland. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Julian McMahon: son of a former PM, he has gone to forge a very successful acting career in the US, and has worked on shows such as the quirky US hit Nip/Tuck which reportedly earned him upwards of $6 million in a year.

Rove McManus: has become one of Australia's premier light entertainment personalities. Starting as a comedian, he owns his own production company that produces Rove Live.

Ian McMullin: most of his wealth has been derived from the Spotless group, a company he founded with his brother, pressing trousers in a small shop in the Melbourne suburb of Fitzroy. The BRW claims $229 million.

Brian McNamee: the CSL chairman returned to the board last year owning 168,503 shares which were worth $50.5 million when the stock cracked $300 in January 2020. Brian is one of the few people to have sold shares before coming onto a board in order not to have too big a stake in the company given this could cause a conflict of interest. Indeed, as we pointed out in this Feb 26 2018 Constant Investor piece, when he retired as CEO 6 years ago he owned 851,655 ordinary shares and a further 605,648 LTI rights. Assuming all those LTIs vested, he could have owned 1.457 million shares currently worth $437 million. Rather than just being on our Rich List with its $20 million cut off, Brian could have made The AFR or The Australian's top 200, if only he'd never sold a share.

Ron McNeilly: the former BHP Steel boss made more than $10 million from his days at the Big Australian, but it was the chairmanship of engineering bolter Worley Parsons that has delivered more than that again. The stock peaked at almost $54 in June 2007 when his stake was worth more than $40 million.

McPherson brothers: Brendon and Leigh own a large holding of Donaldson Coal Holdings.

McWilliam family: famous for their wine, the McWilliam family own one of Australia's largest privately-owned wine companies based at Griffith, NSW. Future direction is shifting towards a focus on the premium market. The BRW claims $311 million.

Bruce McWilliam: the lawyer and Seven Group Holdings executive director owns about 2.1m shares worth more than $30 million, plus an estimated $100 million property portfolio in Sydney.

Thomas Meakin: principal consultant of engineering services company Sedgman owns about 17m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.20 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million, bottomed at 50c in January 2009 and recovered to around $1.41.

Ron and Roy Medich: self-made millionaires from the Sydney Croatian community, their wealth is focussed around commercial property in Sydney and Melbourne.

Nelson Meers: former Sydney Lord Mayor who now owns pokies pubs worth more than $100 million.

Phil Mehrten: founding director of Melbourne-based Probuild Constructions. He has become known for completing projects on time and on budget. Under his leadership, annual turnover has increased from $20 million in 1987 to $300 million.

Don Meij: managing director of the Domino's Pizza Enterprise, who has made more than $100 million from his shares.

Zimi Meka: the founder and CEO of mining services company Ausenco, which is chaired by former Queensland Premier Wayne Goss. He owns around 15m shares. The stock peaked at almost $17 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $250 million, bottomed at $2 in December 2008 and recovered to around $4.25. The BRW claims $444 million.

Rob Melham: founder and director of M8 Telecom, a virtual mobile service provider, who in 2010 advertised his 1400 square metre harbourside mansion in Kirribilli with expectations it would fetch more than $10 million.

Hans Mende: of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009 which he benefited greatly from the sale.

Menegazzo family: in the 1980s, Peter Menegazzo was Australia's biggest potato farmer based in Swan Hill. Famously he was part of a consortium that purchased AMP's Stanbroke Pastoral Company just before a boom in beef property. Died in a 2006 plane crash but his children now run the empire. The BRW claims $722 million.

Lou Menniti: he arrived in Australia from Italy at the age of five, and following a building apprenticeship he heads Menniti Holdings In Brisbane. Still involved in Development and Construction in Brisbane and Italy, his wealth is north of $50 million.

Rod Menzies: Melbourne's multi-millionaire cleaning magnate and art saleroom supremo he founded Menzies International, which is one of Australia's 500 most profitable private companies. Menzies International incorporates a cleaning business, fine art auction house, vineyard and racehorse stable.

Gordon Merchant: from humble beginnings as a small board shorts manufacturer on the Gold Coast, Billabong International became a global surf and streetwear conglomerate and Gordon's stake peaked at almost $18.50 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $580 million. Subsequently came a cropper and was taken over.

Phillip Merrick: the co-founder of US software company WebMethods which has an annual turnover of more than $200 million.

David Merson: ex-CEO and recently retired director of Mincom, which he founded in 1979. Under his watch, it grew into Australia's largest software developer and exporter with 1,200 staff, annual revenues of $200 million, and global leadership in various IT sector systems. He owns a significant property portfolio and has financial interests in a host of software plays.

Alan & Irene Messer: founded Lifespace probiotics in 2017. Was valued at $485 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $422 million in 2019.

Peter Meurs: part of the "Worley three", he runs the Australian and New Zealand businesses of the global engineering giant Worley Parsons. The stock peaked at almost $54 in June and again in December 2007 when he was worth more than $40 million, bottomed at $11 in December 2008 but recovered to almost $24 in January 2010. The BRW claims $526 million.

Michell family: riding the back of sheep into wealth, GH Michell & Sons remain Australia's biggest processors and exporters of wool.

Ian Middlemas: director of several energy and resources companies, his combined share wealth is upwards of $10 million. Chairs resource investor Apollo Group.

Heidi Middleton & Sarah-Jane Clarke: have their own fashion label, Sass & Bide. They have just signed contracts with Blur Optix and Lovable to branch into eyewear and lingerie. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Naomi Milgrom: In 1990, Naomi Milgrom followed her father Marc Bessen and became Group Managing Director of the Sussan fashion Group. Naomi is now the executive chair and CEO of one of Australia's largest privately held retailers. Milgrom owns 100% equity in the Sussan, Suzanne Grae and Sportsgirl retail chains which includes over 520 retail outlets and over 4000 employees. Her wealth is reported to be north of $500 million and is one Australia's richest businesswomen. The BRW claims $660 million. The Australian valued at $557 million in 2019.

Ian Miller: the man behind Miller's Retail, now known as Specialty Fashion Group, owns about 14.4m shares. The stock peaked at almost $2.10 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $20 million, bottomed at 20c in December 2008 and had recovered to around $1.43.

RV Millar: Launceston car dealer who joined the board of tree-lopping giant Gunns Ltd
and owned about 7m shares worth more than $20 million at the peak, before it later collapsed.

Stephen Millar - is the CEO and President of Constellation Wines, which became the world's largest wine business when BRL Hardy was acquired by US company Constellation Brands Inc. He's still based in Adelaide.

Robert Millner and Family: Substantial shareholders in diversified investment company, Washington H Soul Pattinson. The Australian valued at $1.13 billion in 2019. The empire was built up by Jim Millner who joined Soul Pattinson as trainee pharmacist in Sydney 1938 before enlisting. After spending years in Japanese POW camps, he returned to Souls. Under his management, he successfully built Souls through diverse and shrewd investing which now includes Brickworks, TPG and New Hope Coal.

David Mingay: owner of the Daracon Group, the largest privately owned Civil/Mining/Transport/Property company in NSW which has a turnover of around $300m. He owns huge land banks in Newcastle and other areas, and he owns and operates 8 quarries.

Kylie Minogue: is most famous from her singing career, has also worked as an actress, owns a lingerie and fragrance line. She also owns property in Melbourne, Paris and London. Made BRW Young Rich List and donated $500,000 to the bushfires appeal.

Nick Minogue: the former head of risk management at Macquarie Bank was paid $4.4 million in 2006-07 and owned 110,000 shares which if retained today would be worth more than $15 million.

George Mirabella: part of the Mirabella Lighting empire, whose father Paul started it all in the 1950s.

Michael Miroshnik: The high-profile cosmetic surgeon in Sydney's eastern suburbs sold his Vaucluse mansion in 2019 for $37 million after buying it for $7.1 million in 2014.

Aram Mirkazemi: CEO of listed company Altium who owns shares worth more than $250 million.

Tom Misner: founder of the international network of audio engineering and digital media schools, SAE Institute, that educates over 36,000 students a year.

Hilton Misso: the biggest beneficiary of the $57 million purchase of Brisbane-based plaintiff law firm Trilby Misso by Slater & Gordon for an eye-popping $57 million in 2010. He first became a partner in 1974 but largely stopped working for the firm in 2002 when he retired from running the Redcliffe office which was then completely closed in 2006 after operations were consolidated in Brisbane.

Mitchell family: own 50% of the Mitchell transport business which handles remote transport logistics for big miners, especially in the Pilbara, and reportedly delivers EBIT of almost $20 million a year.

Barry Mitchell: part of the Mitchell Brown Group that previously owned ISP Westnet which was recently sold to iiNet for $81 million in cash, a quarter of which went to Barry.

Harold Mitchell
: Australia's most famous media buyer. The Australian valued at $350 million in 2019.

Julian Mitchell
: before becoming an investment director for JM Asset Management, he had worked extensively as a research analyst and investment banker across the world.

Neville Mitchell: the long-serving former finance director of Cochlear made more than $20 million on his incentive shares as the company boomed. Also active in the NSW Liberal Party.

Nick Mitris: the other half of the gaming machine manufacturer, Olympic Amusements, which was sold in 1998 for more than $150 million. Now concentrates on prawn farming but was one of the Opes Prime customers protected from margin calls over shares in Aristocrat Leisure, so the wealth might be getting a little wobbly.

Lev Mizikovsky: chairman of Queensland-based construction company Tamawood, he owns about 22m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3.30 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $65 million, bottomed at $1.50 in February 2009 and recovered to around $2.65.

Mat Mladin: six-time winner of the AMA Superbike Championship, he runs a motorcycle import business and has a large contract with Suzuki.

Max Moar: the long-time partner of the late Ted Lustig, he's now out of Melbourne's Hyatt hotels and is now developing land on the coast of Mexico to house the millions of retirees from the US. The BRW claimed $379 million in 2010.

Dr Sanjay Mohindra:
the Gold Coast-based cosmetic surgeon has been practising in Australia since 1989 and has built up a tidy share portfolio as well which includes 77,758 Macquarie Group shares worth almost $10 million in mid-2020.

Andrew Mohl: the former AMP CEO collected a tidy $6 million salary package in 2007 and walked out as the proud owner of about 1.6m shares, suggesting he is worth between $20-$30 million after five years running the place. Hopefully he didn't hang on given later disasters. Also served a stint on the CBA board.

Stephen Moignard: a former magazine publisher and serial entrepreneur.

Nick Molnar: Co-founder and CEO of Afterpay. Was valued at $487 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $859 million in 2019, along with his partner Anthony Eisen.

Ned Montarello: executive chairman of Perth-based financial services technology company Thinksmart who floated the business in 2007 and still owns about 13.7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $2.40 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $25 million, bottomed at 10c in January 2009 and recovered to around 90c.

David Moore: the former managing director of nickel miner Mincor who made plenty out of his 4m shares which peaked at $5.20 in November 2007.

Nicholas Moore: anyone who's paid more than $30 million two years in a row is seriously rich, and Macquarie Group's new CEO has been raking in the huge dollars for over a decade after pioneering the listed infrastructure fund model. The Australian valued at $407 million in 2019.

John Moore: John Howard's former Defence Minister lost a house bid when it topped $8 million a few years back so he's clearly worth plenty.

Simon Moore: the son of John Howard's former Industry Minister John Moore who carved out a successful private equity career running the Australian arm of Carlyle for many years and then setting up his own firm Colinton Capital. Has a big personal investment worth more than $20 million in car repair giant AMA.

Nick Moraitis: claims to run Australia's leading fresh produce company and is also a major shareholder in Sydney's markets by virtue of large operations he has there. Also owns many race horses and sits on the Sydney Turf Club board.

Doug Moran: the founder of the Moran Group was once Australia's largest private nursing home operator. The BRW claimed $239 million in 2010.

Rob Moran: the former co-head of corporate finance at Allco Finance Group owned 3.43 million that peaked in value at $44.5m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.

Simon Mordant: the career investment bankers has donated more than $10 million to Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art which he has long chaired. Made his money as an investment banker with the likes of BZW before setting up his own boutique firm Calliburn.

David Morgan: the former Westpac CEO is worth more than $50 million courtesy of the enormous profits generated by the banking cartel over the past 25 years since CBA was 100% privatised in 1996.

Gary Morgan: the colourful pollster and Melbourne eccentric who still runs and controls Roy Morgan Research. Lost plenty in his gold play Haoma Mining.

Geoff Morgan: alongside Andrew Banks he set up the recruitment firm Morgan & Banks which is now known as Hudson. They sold M&B and then did it all against with Talent2. The BRW claimed $282 million in 2010.

Graeme Morgan: collected $108 million when he sold funds administration business Sealcorp to St George Bank in 1997.

Hugh Morgan: the former long-serving WMC chief executive and out-spoken Liberal Party supporter is thought to be worth more than $30 million.

Peter Morgan: former controlling shareholder in boutique fund manager 452 Capital but made his name as head of equities at Perpetual.

Kevin Moriarty:
the former executive chairman of Adelaide-based zinc miner Terramin Resources owns about 9m shares in 2007 when the stock peaked at more than $4.

Rob Morley: chairman of the Sterling Motor Group who in 2010 moved to sell his Portsea mansion with expectations it would fetch $5 million.

Chris Morris: the founder of Computershare has built it into the world's biggest share registry and services company. Now worth close to $1 billion. The Australian valued at $1.02 billion in 2019

Karl Morris: former CEO of Ord Minnett, he swapped his stake in Ord Minnett for around 11.1m Auswealth shares, which merged with IOOF Holdings in April 2009.

Kate Morris: co-founder of online retailer Adore Beauty who enjoyed a $46 million pay day in 2020 selling 40% of her shares in the Melbourne-based company when it floated in 2020. See AFR coverage. Earlier sold a 60% stake to Quadrant Private Equity on a valuation of $110 million in 2019.

Terry Morris: has built his wealth from property investment and a mail-order business, and also owns the Sirromet winery. The BRW claimed $224 million in 2010.

John Morrison: former London-based CEO of Man Investments, which runs the world's largest independent manager of hedge funds, with 1500 staff in 15 countries. Started out as a Sydney lawyer and then a Labor staffer before joining John Elliott's Elders Finance in 1986. Later moved to Ord Minnett where a Man joint venture set him on the path to running $US70 billion of investments.

Simon Morrison: a 24% shareholder in listed class action law firm Shine whose 42.3m shares were worth about $30 million in May 2020.

Dennis Morton:
large shareholder of Eastern Star Gas who owned about 14.6m shares and benefited from the 90c a share Santos takeover.

Allan Moss: former Macquarie Bank CEO who collected $107 million in salary over his last five years running the Millionaire Factory. The BRW claimed $225 million in 2010.

Bill Moss: Macquarie Bank's long-serving property boss was paid more than $15 million a year before retiring and has amassed his own considerable property holdings over the years.

Denise Moss:
the former wife of Bill Moss, a long term Macquarie Group executive, still owns 56,994 shares worth about $7 million in mid-2020. They separated in 2000, as this profile in The Australian explains.

Sam Moss and family: co-founder of retail chain Katies. Sam died at the age of 90 in 2019 and the family cashed in its half share in a $95 million Point Piper residential sale in 2020, with the buyer being a gold mining billionaire from China.

Alf Moufarrige
: found a niche with upmarket serviced offices, and established the listed company Servcorp of which he owns around 48m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6 in October 2006 when he was worth more than $280 million. The BRW claimed $210 million in 2010.

Dov Mowszowski: his father founded The Lighting Corp company which was still 25% owned by Dov when listed.

Wes Moxley: former CEO and part owner of Gold Coast boat building business Riviera who had Gresham as his major shareholder for a time.

Andrew Muir: the Good Guys boss purchased disgraced businessman Steve Vizard's Orrong Rd mansion $17.75 million. JB Hi Fi paid almost $1 billion for the business.

John Mulcahy: the former CEO of Suncorp who pocketed more than $15 million from the insurer, plus plenty more in the previous 20 years which included stints with Lend Lease and Commonwealth Bank.

John Mullen - former CEO of DHL Express, a $US28 billion revenue market leader in the international documents, packages and logistics industry. Returned to Australia and became CEO of Asciano and now chairs both Telstra and Brambles.

Luke Mullins: co-founder of recruitment company Gemteq Executive which was sold in February 2008 for $19.5 million.

Rick Munday
: started as a chef, then bought his own restaurant before moving into pubs across Australia with the Munday Group. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Nigel Munt: one of the three major shareholders who profited from the $57 million purchase of Brisbane-based plaintiff law firm Trilby Misso by Slater & Gordon for an eye-popping $57 million in 2010. He first became a partner in 1995 and retired several years before the sale.

Marc Munzer
: a former partner of Solly Lew's in Housewares International who pocketed more than $20 million selling his stake after the 1999 float.

Jonathan Munz and family
: plumbing manufacture owners, valued at $1.58 billion by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.24 billion in 2019

Euan Murdoch: outbid John Howard's former industry minister John Moore in paying $8.55 million for an historic homestead near Beaudesert in south-east Queensland in 2005 and collected $123 million from the sale of his Herron pharmaceutical business in 2004.

Tosh Murphy: A Queensland property developer who had some interesting dealings with elected councillors.

David Murray: received more than $25 million in salary from his 15 years running the Commonwealth Bank. Has also made more than $25 million from his shares and options over the years.

Mussett family: their aged-care business, Conform Health Group, was purchased by Babcock & Brown Communities for $160 million. The BRW claimed $160 million in 2010.

Myer family: a philanthropic family, whose initial wealth was formed by their interests in the Myer department store chain. Sidney Myer arrived in Melbourne in 1899 and built an empire, leaving his family a fortune worth £1.1m upon his death in 1934. The BRW claimed $1.5 billion in 2010.

Allan Myers: one of Australia's best commercial QCs and Australia's richest lawyer, largely thanks to a stake in a Polish brewery once owned by his client Alan Bond. The Australian valued at $812 million in 2019.


Lawrence Myers: one of the directors of listed hedge fund VGI (ASX code: VG1) – he reportedly paid $43 million for Brett Blundy's Sydney mansion in 2018.

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Ian Narev: the former CBA CEO made more than $30 million during his stint with Australia's biggest bank.

Jac Nasser: the former Ford CEO was sacked in 2001 with a final payout of almost $35 million after many years of multi-million dollar salary packages. The guy jokes about moving the Toorak property market if he ever started looking, so he acts like a seriously wealthy individual. A turnaround story at Polaroid, which he chaired until it was sold, has also delivered a profit of about $20 million.


Steve Nasteski: Brett Whiteley's former art dealer is these days described as an art collector and prestige home flipper after shelling out on a number of NSW properties in recent years.

Hilton Nathanson: following a stint at Goldman Sachs post graduation, he co-founded hedge fund Marble Bar Asset Management. Lives in London. The BRW claimed $385 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $641 million in 2019.

Paul Naude: from humble beginnings as a small board shorts manufacturer on the Gold Coast, Billabong International became a global surf and streetwear conglomerate. Paul was a director who owned about 1.4m shares when the stock peaked at $18.50 in July 2007 before later crashing.

Naylor family: the estranged son of the late Channel Nine newsreader Brian Naylor has claimed the estate was worth $20 million.

Campbell Neal: executive chairman and CEO of K2 Asset Management Holdings, he owned shares worth more than $55 million in March 2010.

Bruce Neil: most money invested in superannuation and managed funds goes through an administration service. Bruce Neil's company, Select Managed Funds, supplied this service and was listed in 2005. He then sold to Australian Wealth Management in 2006 and has spent his time building horse breeding interests. At one point owned 27.8m shares in IOOF.

Gene Neill: Mount Eliza businessman in Victoria who in February 2008 featured in a Melbourne Magazine story about luxury boats and confessed to having owned 10 over the years, the latest being a $3 million birthday present.

Kerr Neilson: as a star fund manager for BT in the 1980s, he broke away to form his own group, Platinum Asset Management, and is now a confirmed billionaire after it floated in 2007. He holds around 323m shares or 57.59%. The stock peaked at almost $8.80 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $2.5 billion. The 2010 BRW claims $2.33 billion. Forbes valued at $US2.2bn in March 2010. The AFR valued him at $1.49 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.19 billion in 2019

Judith Neilson: ex-wife of Kerr Neilson, The AFR valued her at $1.77 billion in 2019. Doing great things funding public interest journalism. The Australian valued at $1.25 billion in 2019

Neumann family: the Gold Coast-based Neumann Group was founded in 1948 by Alfred Neumann. Owning many interests in both residential and commercial property, they also have mineral, fuel and quarrying businesses.

Max New: he built his wealth in textiles which has been supported by his astute share dealings. Also, the father-in-law to failed mining tycoon Joseph Gutnick.

Marylyn New: involved in property, she owns Fremantle's Esplanade Hotel and also 70 apartments in Fremantle's Woolstores project.

Alan Newman: Robert Holmes a Court's understudy attempted to replicate his old boss through the growth of Futuris (now Elders) but he ended up selling his stake in the company for more than $10 million.

Mark Newman: chief investment officer of K2 Asset Management Holdings, he owns shares worth more than $43 million in March 2010.

Maurice Newman: former chairman of ASX Ltd after a 14 year stretch, his wealth is estimated at almost $20 million, much of which came from the outrageously generous 1998 demutualisation.


Rob Newman: CEO of booming aerial mapping firm Nearmap and has also made many millions out of his shareholding in listed 3D mapping business Pointerra, as is explained in this AFR article.

Newsboys: with more success in the US than in their home country of Australia, and members of the band changing, they are still the world's biggest Christian rock act.

Peter "Talky" Newton: was a mining broker for County NatWest in the 1980s. After that, he put pre-float seed money into Hill 50 Gold in the 1990s and made a small fortune when South Africa's Harmony Gold took it over. Then put pre-float seed money into Abelle Ltd which was also profitably sold to Harmony. Other big plays included Bluestone Tin, a funds management outfit in the 1990s, Sydney Gas and a horse stud as you can see here. Was also CEO of MetalsX who owns about 66m shares or 5.92%. That stock peaked at 47c in June 2007 when the stake was worth $33 million.

Sunny Ngai and Family: The Australian valued at $498 million in 2019.

Nicholas family
: their fortune was founded on Australia's most famous pharmaceutical product Aspro, but is somewhat diluted and spread amongst the family.

Giovanni Nicoletti: a large grain farmer from Westonia in WA who has a solid stake in AWB shares.

Mario Nicomede:
was one of three shareholders in Sydney-based Sasso Pre-cast Concrete which was sold to Brickworks for $35 million in March 2010.

Ross Nielson:
founder of southeast Queensland-based Nielson Properties which has over $1 billion worth of projects. He also owns commercial properties in Brisbane.

Kevin Nixon:
his real estate business was established in Moorabbin, Victoria in March 1976 specialising exclusively in commercial and industrial property, including investment properties. The company has now grown to become a recognised leader in its field and manages over 900 properties.

Gavin and Nigel Nixon:
former executive directors Retail Food Group which owns the Donut King and Brumby's Bakeries franchises. They together owned 10m shares. Stock peaked at more than $5 before almost going broke in 2019.

Nick Noutsatos: owner of the company At Sam Seafood Holdings, he began by selling fish out the back of a van and has now grown annual turnover to more than than $70 million.

Ross Norgard
: former director of Brockman Resources, who owns about 17.6m shares. The stock peaked at almost $3 in May 2008 when he was worth more than $50 million but was barely 3c in early 2020.

Christopher Norman: a former director of Perth-based ship builder Austal, who owned 26m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4 in February 2007 when he was worth more than $100 million before weakening.

Greg Norman: former world number one golf professional, Greg Norman continues to build his wealth through golf course design, property, clothing, wine and export beef. Despite a nasty and costly divorce, his wealth is still north of $200 million. The BRW claims $254 million. The Australian valued at $375 million in 2019.

Ian Norman family
: the late co-founder of Harvey Norman had a substantial property portfolio, but the majority of his wealth can be attributed to the rise of the retail giant, Harvey Norman, which he established with Gerry Harvey in 1982. The family controls about 17%, compared with Gerry Harvey who has around 30%.

Ralph Norris: the former CBA CEO was paid $6.5 million in 2006-07 and walked out having made about $30 million in total given the strong performance of his share incentives.

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O 22

Bob Oatley: made his first fortune in coffee before pocketing a clear $1 billion building the Rosemount Estate wine business which he sold to Southcorp in 2000, giving it enormous indigestion. Foster's then bought Southcorp and Bob now focuses on his boats and developing Hamilton Island. The 2010 BRW claims $1.25 billion. Forbes valued at $US710m in March 2010. After Bob passed in 2016 his family is now valued at $1.13 billion dollars by The Australian

Obeid Family: who says Labor politicians don't know how to manage money. Eddie Obeid and his 5 sons have acquired tens of millions down the years through various interesting means which eventually led to Eddie finishing up in jail.

Peter O'Brien: went broke in the 1990s after taking on too much debt buying pubs from Foster's but has come back brilliantly through his acquarium play which was sold to MFS in 2006. Unfortunately, he took a little too much stock and suffered from the MFS implosion.

Kevin O'Connor: the owner of G&K O'Connor Abattoirs in Pakenham, easily the largest beef abattoir in Victoria. All product is exported to Japan, the Middle East and Europe. The plant slaughters 1000 animals a day five days a week, bones them and also renders the by-product (margarine, fertiliser and the like). However, O'Connor had a rough fight with Victoria's meat unions a few years back as you can see here.

Jamie Odell: the former Aristocrat Leisure CEO made plenty on his incentive scheme as the company performed well and is now prospering in private equity land through Ellerston Capital.

Simon O'Donoghue: has been in real estate all his working life and for 31 years has been the principal of O'Donoghues First National. Having always operated in the Northern suburbs of Melbourne, he has become a leading agent in Victoria.

Geoff Ogilvy
: a past winner of the US Open golf tournament who made plenty on the tour.

Frank O'Halloran: The long-serving QBE Insurance managing director made more than $20 million from his time with the company.

Michelle O'Halloran: owned 8.19 million shares in Computershare which were worth almost $100 million at the time. In 2010 sold her Portsea mansion for $26 million to John Higgins.

Trevor O'Hoy: the former Foster's CEO subsequently had a strong pay day as the executive chair of Suisse when it was sold for more than $1.5 billion.

Nicolas O'Kane: Head of Commodities and Global Markets of Macquarie Group. Total 2018-19 pay of $18 million and made millions on shareholding as well.

William O'Keeffe: former chairman of African coal miner Riversdale Mining which Rio Tinto foolishly paid $16.50 a share to buy. The former MIM executive and Glencore Australia managing director owned 3.8m shares.

Denis and Myrna O'Meara: owed 11m shares in Atlas Iron. The stock peaked at almost $4.10 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $40 million, before taking a dive.

Denis O'Neil: with roots back to Hymix concrete, this Sydney fortune has continued to grow. Denis O'Neil has a vast property portfolio including a Cairns hotel, numerous Sydney apartments in his completed developments, including Observatory Tower, The Rex in Kings Cross and Sydney Park. Has recently purchased the Point Piper and Rose Bay Marina. In 2010 the BRW claims $134 million.

Derek O'Neill: the former Billabong International CEO spent 20 years with the company and made millions from his shares.

Naum Onikul: the former Woolworths director of food, liquor and petrol was paid more than $10m in salary and owned shares worth more than $15 million.

Alan and David Oppenheim: Alan is the managing director and his brother David is on the board Ego Pharmaceuticals Their late father, Gerald (the G in Ego) started the business in 1953, by developing a product to cure his son's cradle cap - Ego Pine Tar Bath Solution, later called Pinetarsol, and has now grown into global business with an average turnover of over $68 million.

O'Reilly family: run the legendary O'Reillys eco-tourism business in Lamington National Park show-casing arguably Australia's best remaining rain forest in the Gold Coast hinterland. Five brothers and three cousins were originally sold 800 acres to clear and farm in 1911 but over time they realised the fortune to be made from eco-tourism.

Don O'Rorke: the former managing director of Consolidated Properties for the Trinity Property Group, he had a share wealth of more than $20 million.


Paul O'Shea: starting with a nursing home in Sydney 30 years ago, he bulit up TriCare to be the largest private retirement accommodation service in Queensland.

Stephen O'Young: co-founder of family photo sharing business Tinybeans Group who pocketed $2.72 million selling 20% of his stake in the company in early 2020.

Oswal family: behind Burrup Fertilisers which pulled its planned 2008 float, they are currently building a palatial $70 million home in the exclusive Perth suburb of Peppermint Grove which will sit as a monument to the excesses of the resources boom.

Steve Outtrim: sprang to fame with the Sausage Software float and eventually sold out for a $50 million-plus profit. Outtrim now runs ekoLiving, which aims at managing and reducing home energy use, and hi-tech home entertainment management.

Les Owen: under his leadership AXA successfully undertook a major transformation program which resulted in significant improvements in performance and shareholder value. The Liverpudlian has stayed in Australia after retiring.

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P 88


David Pace: co-founder of Greencape Capital, a boutique fund manager with more than $10 billion under management. Sold around 40% to Challenger in a couple of tranches and paid $32m dividend in 2018-19 alone. Equity worth plenty more.

James Packer: inheriting a massive media empire, and an intricate web of other business interests, James is adjusting his focus away from televisions and magazines that built his family's fortune, and concentrating on casinos, which are now struggling. Forbes valued at $US3.5bn in 2010. The Australian valued him at $4.227 billion in 2019. Together with Crown Resorts, has committed $5m to bushfire relief. The Australian valued at $4.23 billion in 2019

Gretel Packer: Eldest sister of James Packer, investor and inheritor of Packer fortune. The Australian valued at $1.15 billion in 2019

Gregory Page: founding member of The Wiggles, most of the wealth is generated from touring and dancing with children globally. Has announced a concert to raise funds for the bush fires.

Katie Page: CEO of her husband's company, Harvey Norman together they have created a retailing powerhouse. Owns around 18m shares directly worth about $70 million.

Walter Pahor: his first project, a gas turbine power station in Pine Creek, led to the formation of Energy Establishments, which entered into partnership with Brightstar Synfuels USA.

John Paini: his Timevale property group sold the Aussie World theme park on the Sunshine Coast to Village Roadshow for a reported $15 million.

Clive Palmer: mining main chancer and property developer who got into Parliament with his own party. The Australian valued him at $4.510 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $4.51 billion in 2019

Ross Palmer: the bulk of his wealth was derived from the sale of Palmer Tube Mills in 1994. His company, Procar Australia, manages many of the races in the national car-racing championship series.

David Paradice: fund manager who The Australian valued at $599 million in 2019.

Peter Papas: he rode the technology boom of the 1990s establishing and selling two software companies and was also the founder of N-Space which he sold to a subsidiary of MYOB.

Tom Park: the former Southcorp CEO only spent 5 months of his 5 year contract with the company but after buying Rosemout for $1.5 billion and bringing the management team in he was redundant but still collected $7.8 million in 2001 before taking the reigns at Goodman Fielder where he lined up for another huge whack of options. Add another $2.3 million that he got the following year and Park's 5-month effort at Southcorp paid him an incredible $10.1 million. Later became CEO of Paperlinx where he destroyed heaps of value during the credit crunch.

John Parker: of Felix Resources, a former Australian resources company was purchased by China's Yanzhou Coal in 2009 and he benefited greatly from the sale.

Philip Parker: real estate agent and founding director of Queensland developer FKP, which became Aveo. Owned 13m shares or 5% of the company when the stock peaked at $7.50 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $90 million, but it then tumbled to a low of 50c in December 2008.

Greg Paramor: the former managing director of Mirvac owns about 5.7m shares and was paid almost $10 million in salary during his tenure. The stock peaked at almost $6 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $30 million, bottomed at $1 in November 2008 and recovered to around $1.43.

Aaron Parkhill: the property developer and nephew of Westfield co-founder Frank Lowy was reportedly offering his Bellarine Peninsula waterfront estate in Victoria for an asking price of $20-$22 million in early 2020.

Bruce Parncutt: the former managing director of stockbroker MacIntosh Securities has been a canny investor and director over the years in businesses such as King Island Cheese.

Nev Pask: one of Queensland's most respected property developers and businessmen, is Chairman of a group of 25 companies. He was responsible for the development of over 1500 house and land packages on the Redcliffe Peninsula as well as several commercial projects.

Paspaley family: founded in the 1950s in the Northern Territory by Nick Paspaley senior, 60% of their fortune is generated through the family's pearling business. They have continued to grow through diversifying into property, retail and investment. The BRW claims $620 million.

Wayne Passlow
: the founder and CEO of the software company Open Telecommunications who was at one point a paper billionaire but now far more modestly wealthy.

Bill Paterson: co-founder of engineering giant Worley Parsons, who was the second largest shareholder after CEO John Grill. In 2010 the BRW claimed $290 million.

David Paterson: a geologist and former stockbroker who made plenty from his ASX membership but did better from the 9.1m shares he owned as a director of zinc miner Terramin Resources. The stock peaked at almost $4.10 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $35 million, before taking a tumble.

Brett Paton: an investment banker who went on to become a professional director and then made serious money in two separate public companies: Magellan and Pointsbet. The AFR recently did a Rich List update and pointed out that his Poinstbet stake, which he chairs, was worth $74 million in August 2020.

Barry Patterson: the former chairman of Silex Systems owned 4m shares worth around $50 million when the stock peaked at almost $13 in July 2007.

Nicole and Stuart Patterson: founders of Melbourne-based Patterson Building Group.

Colette Paull: one of the earliest Billabong International employees in 1973 and was later a non-executive director who owned 2.5m shares worth almost $50m when the stock peaked at $18.50 in June 2007 before taking a tumble.

Tom Payne: he shares an interest in 280 poker machines with the Steele family, and has yearly earnings estimated at $30 million from his pub and pokies interests.

Rodney Payne: a Sydney-based former BT trader and founding director of Zurich Capital Markets Australia who in 2011 placed his Seaforth mansion on the market for $8 million.

Terrence Peabody: in 1987 he established the the waste management company Transpacific which was floated in 2005. Terrence Peabody arrived from the US to work on the Snowy Mountain Hydroelectric scheme. He found that waste product from the coal-fired power stations could be used to strengthen concrete, and set up a deal with the government to collect all the waste, and then on-sell it to concrete companies. The Australian valued at $582 million in 2019.

Gary Pearce: the former CEO of Jubilee Mines collected $23 a share for 500,000 options as part of the $3 billion Xstrata takeover in 2007.

Guy Pearce: famous actor and musician. Estimated net worth of $23 million.

Tobias Pearce & Kayla Itsines: engaged couple founded online fitness app Sweat. Was valued at $486 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $487 million in 2019.

John Pearce: co-founder and chairman of Collection House who owned 11.3m shares when the stock peaked at $1.55 in February 2006. Trading at just above $1 in early 2020.

Rod Pearse: the veteran Boral CEO who was earning $5m a year for a number of years whilst running the company.

Richard Pegum
: former Macquarie Bank trading guru who left in 1998 to run his own lucrative hedge fund, Bennelong Asset Management, out of London. Bennelong has grown quickly to become a $1 billion multi-strategy hedge fund focused on the Asia Pacific. Very prominent in thoroughbred circles, Pegum was a part-owner of Melbourne Cup winner Brew and even pops up with a testimonial for a luxury cruiser based out of Port Douglas.

Pellicano family: long-time players in the Melbourne property scene. The BRW claimed $290 million in 2010.

Gary Pemberton
: the former Brambles CEO and Qantas chairman made more than $100 million buying into Billabong International and then chairing it through its float.

Andy Penn:
the former Axa CEO picked up $17 million courtesy of the $15 billion takeover by AMP and its French parent and then made more than $10m as CEO of Telstra.

David Penn: Sydney dental tycoon who paid $52 million in 2010 for the Point Piper home of recruitment pioneer Andrew Banks.

Scott Penn: a healthcare entrepreneur who has owned the Manly-Warringah NRL club since 2006.

Napoleon Perdis
: owns his own line of cosmetics and make-up academies, which started in Sydney and now has stores throughout Australia, New Zealand, and North America. Most of his fame is due to appearances on TV shows such as America's Next Top Model, being a sponsor of the Emmy Awards, and starred in reality show Face On. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Tony Perich: with his sons and brother, he runs Leppington Pastoral Company, one of the biggest dairies in the southern hemisphere. Owning more than 4000 hectares in Sydney's outer west, his land is prime for development into residential housing. The BRW claims $730 million. The AFR valued him at $2.05 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.59 billion in 2019

Gary Perlstein: the CEO of Specialty Fashion Group, formerly Miller's Retail, owns about 17.8m shares. The stock peaked at $2.10 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $30 million, before it took a tumble.



Matthew Perrin: investment in thoroughbreds, a large share portfolio, and strong interests in risk management software company RuleBurst, keep the Gold Coast-based and former Billabong CEO busy but he subsequently went bankrupt and to jail.

Stan Perron
: a resourceful business man, Stan Perron died in 2018 leaving one of the largest philanthropic bequests Australia has seen. He tried his hand at many things, including property, vehicles and stock market investments. The Perron Group is one of Australia's biggest landlords with an annual rental of around $90 million generated from his large portfolio of commercial property and shopping centres.

Allen Perry: a software entrepreneur whose play time assets included an 8.8ha retreat near Port Douglas which is thought to be worth about $4 million.

Greg Perry: the great stock-picker during Colonial First State's glory days never had his $30 million-plus reward revealed because he wasn't nominally an executive like his boss Chris Cuffe.

Jamie Pherous: his company Corporate Travel Management which handles travel contracts for large companies. Made BRW Young Rich List. The Australian valued at $577 million in 2019.

Eddie Phillips: a significant holder of residential and commercial property in the Byron Bay region.


Anthony and Liz Phillips: made their money in Camp Australia, a business which started in Melbourne's eastern suburbs with tennis clinics during the school holidays. Shared in much of the $400 million Bain Capital paid for the business in 2016. Now run The Phillips Foundation.

Andrew Phillips:
former Carlton footballer who, along with brother Anthony, founded and developed Camp Australia which was sold to private equity firm Bain Capital for around $400 million in late 2016.


Robert Phillpot: co-founder of Acconex.

William Phillips
: owned 14.6m shares in Medusa Mining which have traded above $3 but were back below $1 in early 2020.

Pickard family: Adelaide-based owners of Fairmont Homes, Pickard Development Group, Adelaide City Soccer Club, Land SA, Lifestyle SA, Realty SA and The Pickard Foundation, which has donated many millions to the Royal Adelaide Hospital and other charities.

Jamieson Pickering
: leaving school at 16 to work on the family's tomato farm, he became chairman and majority shareholder of a successful enterprise called Tomato.

Pidgeon family
: Brisbane-based family which has built shopping centres and huge developments around the city since since the Joh days.

Geoff Pigot: a former non-executive director of Queensland coal miner Aquila Resources who owned 13m shares worth more than $200 million when the stock peaked at almost $17.

Michael Pikos: director of the Brisbane-based developer The Pikos Group, which developed multiple apartment towers on the Gold Coast.

Piper family: the late Alan Piper owned car dealerships plus 1.28m shares in Brisbane car auctions company AP Eagers. The stock peaked at almost $17.50 in January 2008.

Wal Pisciotta: former chairman and co-founder of the online portal carsales.com.au. He earned $65 million when it was listed in 2009 and still retains an 8% stake for many years before selling down. In 2010 the BRW claimed $172 million.

Joshua Pitt
: director of Red Hill Iron, his holdings are more than 3.5 million. The stock peaked at almost $7.30 in May 2008 when he was worth more than $30 million, bottomed at $1.80 in January 2009 and recovered to around $3.30.

Rob Pitterino: the former County Natwest stockbroker, now based in Monaco, has invested in most of the profitable ventures that his close mate Peter Newton has enjoyed, including Hill 50 Gold, Abelle Ltd, Bluestone Tin and Sydney Gas.


Mark Pittman: director (since 2010) and large shareholder of boutique Adelaide stockbroker Taylor Collison.

John Piven-Large: one of Australia's most successful liquor merchants, he sold Cellarmasters to Foster's in 1997 for $160 million.

Nir Pizmony: sold JNH, Australia's largest privately owned toy distributor, to Funtastic in 2002 for a reported $30 million but then left the Funtastic board in 2004.

Barry Plant: after opening a single office in Melbourne's Eastern suburbs in 1979, his business expanded and merged with EJ Doherty to become Barry Plant Doherty of which he is a director. With over 10,000 sales in 2008 alone, he established himself as one of Melbourne's leading agents.

Julien Playoust
: Sydney establishment figure who owned an estimated $90 million stake in Tattersall's and has received at least $20 million in distributions since lucrative Victorian pokies licence issued in 1991. Voted onto the board against the wishes of the incumbents in November 2005, but then quit again as part of the Unitab merger.

Andy Plummer
: a major shareholder and executive of Excel Coal when it was sold for $1.9 billion to Peabody Energy, and then owned 22m shares in Whitehaven Coal when it was floated. In 2010 the BRW claimed $255 million.

Greg Poche: for nearly 30 years, he built up his Multigroup Distribution Services company into the highly successful Star Track Express. In 2003, he sold out to Qantas and Australia Post for $750 million and in 1992 he exposed one the most infamous cartels in Australian corporate history, involving TNT, Mayne Nickless and Ansett Transport Industries. The BRW claimed $932 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $566 million in 2019.

Anthony Podesta: former managing director of McMillan Shakespeare, the leading provider of independent salary packaging services in Australia, who owned 12.9m shares. Stock above $13 in early 2020.

Brett Pointon: began by purchasing the management rights to one Queensland hotel and then ran the listed Oaks Hotel and Resorts group out of Brisbane before it was taken over.

Anthony Poli: the former executive chairman of Aquila Resources, which has coal mining interests in Queensland's Bowen Basin. Owned 26m shares when the stock peaked at $17 in May 2008. The Australian valued at $608 million in 2019.

Polites family
: the late Con Polites was a self-made millionaire courtesy of property development. He was born in 1919 in Port Pirie of Greek parents and ended up with his Polites signs all over Adelaide before he passed away in 2001.

Nick Politis: owns the car dealer company WFM Motors, which had a large stake in listed car dealer AP Eagers. Long time chairman of the Sydney Roosters rugby league club. In 2010 the BRW claimed $182 million. The Australian valued at $1.52 billion in 2019

Nick Poll: managing director of the emerging Mirabella Nickel which developed the Santa Rita nickel mine in Brazil that came into production in 2009. Owns about 2m shares when stock peaked at $8 in June 2008 but it later went broke.

Henry Pollack: the Polish migrant was the co-founder of Mirvac in 1973 with Bob Hamilton and still has an estimated $100 million-plus investment portfolio, although he left Mirvac in 1996, aged 73.

John Pollaers: the former Foster's CEO is worth more than $10 million after Foster's shareholders narrowly approved his full incentive payments for 2010-11 and 2011-12 ahead of the $10 billion SAB-Miller takeover.

Ricky Ponting: one of Australia's all time best cricketers, and long time captain, with his Cricket Australia contract and lucrative sponsorship deals, he pulled in more than $4 million in 2009 alone and then enjoyed a $12m pay day selling his 1.2% stake in Beteasy to The Stars Group.

Alex Popescu: long time benefactor to the Geelong Football Club whose $30 million-plus estate courtesy of a timber business was contested by family members.

John Porter: the Austar CEO has made more than $20 million courtesy of a lucrative incentive scheme introduced when the private equity firm CHAMP rescued the company in 2001.

Potter family
: the heirs of legendary stockbroker Sir Ian Potter have more than 36.8 million of shares in listed investment company Australian United Investment Company, if you include The Ian Potter Foundation which is the biggest shareholder with 39.3%. The stock peaked at almost $9.50 in October 2007 when they were worth more than $350 million. The BRW claimed $738 million in 2010.

John Potter: ex CEO of Gold Coast-based developer Villa World whose stake was worth more than $30 million. Also has significant private real estate interests on the Gold Coast and owned a triple block on Hedges Avenue.

Tom Potter: is behind the Eagle Boys pizza franchise which concentrates on regional areas where competiton is less and margins greater.

Brent and Tim Potts: key players behind Southern Cross Equities who benefited from the $100 million sale to Bell Financial Group in 2008.


Len Poulter: founder of one of Australia's largest specialty meat retailer Lenards. Opened his first store in Brisbane in 1987 and franchised into almost 200 stores Australia wide.

Mick Power: owner of Brisbane-based BMD Constructions which turns over $300 million a year in civil and land development. After ignoring him for years, The BRW finally recognised this in 2008, valuing him at $450 million. The Australian valued at $633 million in 2019.

Ceasar Pradella: successful Brisbane-based property developer who is now retired.

Pratt family: the empire was created by the late card-box king Richard Pratt. He started the VISY cardboard empire and had a private investment company, Thorney Investments, which has continued trading buying into small and medium stocks. Anthony Pratt now valued by The Australian at $15.57b billion. Has announced a $1m bushfire donation.

John Prescott: the former BHP CEO was fired on March 4, 1998, sending shares in the Big Australian soaring $1.17 or 8.2% to $15.51. Prescott owned 2.04m shares so his personal stake rocketed by $2.38 million to more than $31 million on the day he was sacked.

Eva Presser: a secretive property player and fruit juice seller who made a hash of running Channel Nine in Perth but still profited nicely from its sale to Bruce Gordon in 2007.

Leon Pretorius: former managing director of uranium explorer Deep Yellow who owned 72.6m shares worth more than $30 million when the stock peaked at 67c in April 2007 before taking a dive.

Andrew Pridham: CEO of listed investment bank Moelis and chair of the Sydney Swans. A career investment banker worth north of $50 million.

Sam Prince: BRW valued him at $207 million in 2015. Made his money in Mexican franchise food and now has a range of other businesses.

Alastair Provan: long time managing director of Bell Financial Group who owned 32 million shares at the peak which were worth more than $50 million when the stock traded above $2 before the GFC.

George Punches: former deputy chairman of Collection House who owned 17.8m shares when the stock peaked at $1.55 in February 2006 when he was worth more than $25 million.

Stuart Purves: owner of Australian Galleries, he once spent $5 million for some John Olsen and Jeffrey Smart artwork at an auction.

Richard Purves: the long-serving chairman of health group DCA who collected about $40 million from private equity firm CVC in a $2.7 billion takeover bid in 2006. Also an environmentalist who has served as chairman of WWF Australia and one of the international directors.

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Q

Stan Quinlivan: the owner of the Ocean Beach Hotel claimed it was worth in excess of $60 million when the nearby Cottesloe Hotel in Perth's swanky beachside suburbs was acquired by Multiplex. Has diverse interests including Skippers Transport, a major logistics operator in Perth and WA airline Skippers Aviation. Took a strategic stake in Hazelton Airlines in 1997, became Chairman with about 35%, then sold out in a bidding war between Qantas and Ansett for terminal rights at Sydney airport. Also owns about $20 million worth of prime grazing and cropping land at Esperance – including "The Beef Machine." Then there is Gibsons & Patterson, a hospitality industry supplier, distributor and agent. Racehorses are often a sure sign of wealth and Stan is one of the biggest owners in WA, which is not surprising given that he was a leading bookie and trainer in the 1970s.

Christina and Tony Quinn: The Australian valued at $601 million in 2019.

Michael Quinn: former non-executive director of Sydney-based QRX Pharmaceutical who owned 9m shares at the peak.

Patrick Quirk:
backer of investment group Highland Park and former LionOre Mining founder, who also had 5% of Mirabella Nickel.

R

Clive Rabie: former CEO of Reckon who owns 10m shares.

Rabinowicz family: Ezriel migrated to Australia in 1948 after he and his family were held in Auschwitz, his skills in textiles led him to set up the hosiery business, Kortex, which he later sold to concentrate on property. The BRW claimed $287 million in 2010.

Anthony Radford: CEO of Cellestis, developers and marketers of QuantiFERON technology products for medical diagnosis and scientific research. Owned 12m shares worth more than $50m when the stock peaked at $4.70 in February 2006.

Fred Rae: owned the independent Gull Petroleum chain which had more than 100 outlets in WA. The BRW claimed $270 million in 2010.

Pat Rafter: after retiring from professional tennis and avoiding plenty of tax by being based in Bermuda, Rafter joined with the ill-fated Babcock & Brown to launch the brand Bounce. He also had a lucrative contract with Bonds, an Australian underwear company.

Max Raine: the man behind Raine & Horne who own heaps of real estate himself and has a great franchise.

Paul Ramsay: in 1964, when he was 28, he founded Ramsay Health Care which became Australia's biggest private hospital operator. Died in 2014 leaving a $3 billion bequest to the Ramsay Foundation.

Marli and Franz Ranacher: owners of the Bullo River Station, located 800 kilometres southwest of Darwin near the Western Australian border. They also offer guest stays at the property which is becoming an icon in the Top End. With rural property exploding, their holding is said to be worth more than $80 million.

Rob Rankin
: the Australian expat made a fortune as the Hong Kong-based Asian head of investment banking for UBS since 2003 and did equally well at Deutsche Bank before a stint working for James Packer, including as chair of Crown Resorts.

Zeljko Ranogajec
: a relatively anonymous rich lister, he is known by many casinos around the world as "The Joker', and has been classified by many as the world's biggest gambler. It is reported that he alone makes up 6-8% of Tabcorp's annual turnover which equates to around $600-800 million. If you add to this the tens of millions he bets with local bookmakers and other places around the world as far flung as Russia, his annual spend is reported to be more than $1 billion. His team of form and video analysts, which take up a large portion of the top floor of the NSW headquarters of Tabcorp, have helped grow his operation into a multi-billion dollar juggernaut.

Doug Rathbone
: the former managing director and largest shareholder of Nufarm who owned 30m shares. Also has a strong passion for wine owning Global Wine Ventures, which includes the famous Yering Station in the Yarra Valley. The stock peaked at almost $18.20 in June 2008 when he was worth more than $400 million. The BRW claimed $615 million in 2010.

John Rawlins: a professional mine manager and geologist who resigned from the board of the booming Felix Resources in 2007 but still made plenty from his stake in Resources Management and Mining, a major Felix shareholder until March 2007. He'd be a lot richer if they'd stayed on the Felix share register as the coal miner's share price soared in 2008 before the resources bubble burst.

Rawson family: Founders of Burgess Rawson, one of Australia's best known real estate brands, the Rawson family sold Gippsland farms for $20 million in 2019.

Ray family: founded by the late Gold Coast white shoe brigade leader Brian Ray, the family has a diverse property portfolio ranging from hotel and retail properties between Port Douglas and Northern NSW.

Rea family: Ralph, Wally and Beverley Rea together owned 10% of the consortium which bought Stanbroke Pastoral from AMP on the cheap for just $490 million and parlayed some of these profits into the purchase of properties to expand their Queensland cattle empire when Stanbroke was subsequently broken up.

Robert and Jennifer Reardon: cotton and macadamia farmers from Talwood, Queensland, they own a five-bedroom Liberty Panorama penthouse at Main Beach valued at around $15 million.

Redmond family
: this Sydney-based publican family recently purchased the Hurtzville Ritz Hotel for around $40 million which adds to their St Patrick's pub portfolio of three taverns in and around Sydney.

Chad Reed: unheralded, he is an Australian Supercross champion with huge success in the US worth around $25 million. Earnings in 2009 alone were $8.8 million.

David Reed: executive chairman of Perth-based Reed Resources, who owned 20m shares when the stock peaked at $1.11 in January 2007 before falling away.


Tim Reed: CEO of MYOB from 2008-2019, through 2 rounds of private equity transactions (Archer Capital and then Bain Capital) before a relisting on the ASX (2015) and then a privatisation by KKR (2019). His MYOB stake was valued at $45m in this AFR article. Went on to be President of The BCA.

Mary Reemst: Macquarie Bank CEO, as opposed to parent company Macquarie Group. 2018/19 total pay of $6 million. Owned $9 million worth of Macquarie shares in early 2020.

Bruce Reid: owns a substantial portfolio of shares and property and also operates a Sydney Harbour cruise-ship business.

Jeremy Reid: former managing director of Everest Babcock & Brown and a major shareholder before it collapsed. The BRW claimed $66 million before the GFC hit.

John Reid
: a major holding in James Hardie Industries, a company he chaired for 23 years, has driven his wealth. Somehow avoided most of the grief over the dodgy asbestos play.

Peter Reilly:
the former managing director of business services group AUSDOC who went on to become one of the largest shareholders in struggling listed stockbroker Tolhurst with 33m shares. It was eventually bought by
the unlisted Patersons Securities.

Therese Rein: Kevin Rudd's wife has built up quite a fortune through the Ingeus job placement group which turned over $260 million in 2006-07. BRW estimated she was worth $60 million.

Chris Renwick: ran Rio Tinto's Perth-based iron ore division from 1997 until 2004 before becoming non-executive chairman of Coal & Allied. Share plays delivered many millions on top of his salary.

Andrew Rettig: founder of Melbourne developer R Corp which has delivered more than 30 projects.

Richard Revelins: the former finance director of Mintails who owned 14m shares. The stock peaked at almost 90c in June 2007 but then fell away.

Martin Rey: a former Babcock & Brown executive director who used to own more than 1.2m shares. The stock peaked at almost $35 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $40 million, but collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.

Robert Reynolds: former chairman of Avoca Resources whose stake was worth almost $10 million in late 2010.

James Rice
: an Adelaide-based property developer who has concentrated on apartments.

Jodee Rich
: the co-founder of the failed telecommunications company One-Tel managed to extract enough value from his stake before the collapse to ensure his on-going wealth no matter what the regulators have thrown at him.

Robert Rich: the former managing director of Stoddarts Holdings went on to be deputy chairman of Argo Investments where he owned 17.5m shares worth more than $150 million at the peak.

Peter Richards: the former CEO of Dyno Nobel collected more than $20 million from the Incitec Pivot takeover in 2008. He joined Dyno Nobel's Australian operations in 1991, then worked in Asia and North America before returning to lead the Macquarie driven float.

Richards family: JJ Richards & Sons is Australia's largest privately owned waste management operators. Operating out of Queensland, NSW, Victoria and New Zealand, the Brisbane family employ over 900 people. The BRW claimed $267 million in 2010. Big Liberal donors. The Australian valued at $1.13 billion in 2019

Ben Richardson: Co-founder and managing partner at healthcare service Carnall Farrar. Was valued at $371 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $732 million in 2019, along with his partner David Greiner.

Ric Richardson:
Sydney-born founder of IT company, Uniloc, was the winner in a battle with Microsoft over an unauthorised use a software patent registered to his company. Now living in California, a US jury ordered Microsoft to pay $532 million for the unauthorised use.

Tony Richter: founded Formulab Neuronetics Corporation in 1995 and was valued at $427 million by BRW in 1996. Has since gone into administration, taking much of Tony's wealth with it.

Rijs Family: the founders of listed company Patties Foods which still owned 47% after the initial float.

Bianca Rinehart: The Australian valued her at $4.498 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $4.50 billion in 2019

Gina Rinehart: following the death of her father Lang Hancock, Gina has endured his lingering debts, a lengthy court battle for his estate, battles with the family of his business partner and survived nearly going broke in the 1990s. Owning her own iron-ore mines, an ongoing cash deal of receiving royalties from Rio Tinto and a strong Asian appetite for minerals, continue to drive the wealth of Australia's richest woman. Her 50% interest in all the Hope Downs Pilbara mines that Rio Tinto will develop over the coming years arguably means she's even richer than Andrew Forrest and has a wealth in excess of $10 billion. The 2010 BRW claims $4.75 billion. 2019 valuations: The Australian $13.1 billion, AFR $13.8 billion.

Stephen Ring & family: former managing director of Swisse, whose father Kevin Ring founded the business. Was valued at $530 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $597 million in 2019.

Ivan Ritossa: the former Barclays Capital boss paid $45 million in 2008 for David Coe's harbourfront mansion in Vaucluse.

Roberts family: owned the construction giant Multiplex since it all began from humble beginnings with John Roberts in Perth in 1962, until the children pocketed $1 billion selling out to Canadian firm Brookfield Asset Management in 2007. The BRW claimed $1.16 billion in 2010. Tim Roberts, John's son, was valued at The AFR at $2.38 billion in 2019. Andrew Roberts, Tim's son was valued at $862 million in 2019 by The Australian.

Anthony Roberts: owns almost 70% of Porter Davis Homes, a property development company, which is moving to capture the environmentally friendly market. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Christopher Roberts: former CEO of booming ear implant company Cochlear who made more than $50m out of shares.

Lloyd Roberts: Canadian who founded SMS Technology which did an ill-fated paper merger with a falling Sausage Software. Now lives in Melbourne but managed to salvage a tidy pile and SMS subsequently travelled better when chaired by Laurie Cox.

Ian Roberts: co-founded Regis age healthcare service. Was valued at $519 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $561 million in 2019.

Alex Robertson:
established in 1926, Alexander Robertson Real Estate manages over $500 million of commercial property, retail property and industrial property. The family also owns more than $100m worth of pokies pubs in Melbourne. See this profile in CBD News. Alex passed away in 2019.

Hugh Robertson: a Melbourne stockbroker who in 2007 was paid more than $6.8 million as executive director of Bell Potter and later retained shares worth more than $3 million in the listed Bell Financial Group.

Kim Robinson: former executive chairman of Kagara Zinc who owned 12.4m shares worth more than $80m when the stock peaked at $7.60 in September 2006.

Lee Robinson: an ex-pat living in London and owner of fund manager Trafalgar Asset Managers which sold a 20 per cent stake to investment bank Goldman Sachs making him worth more than $120 million.

Roche family: established in 1922, Adelaide Development Company (ADC) was founded by John Roche, and is Australia's oldest property developer. Concentrating on developing large residential properties in Adelaide, it has expanded into WA as the Estate Development Company. The BRW claimed $200 million in 2010.

Steve Roche: a 24% shareholder in listed class action law firm Shine whose 42.3m shares were worth about $30 million in May 2020.

Bill and Imelda Roche
: heavily involved with property development, constructing thousands of residential projects in Queensland and NSW. The husband and wife team worked alongside each other for 40 years, after meeting in a supermarket in 1956. Initally selling lamps door-to-door, they took a stake in burgeoning company Nutri-Metics, which they later sold to the Sara Lee Corporation. The BRW claimed $659 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $536 million in 2019. The AFR valued Bill and Imelda Roche at $1.42 billion in 2019.

Rockefeller family: wealthy property developers who came to Australia from America but are not related to the famous Standard Oil founder. Were struck with tragedy after the alleged murder of Herman Rockefeller in Melbourne.

Greg Roebuck: the former chief executive of carsales.com.au who made more than $100 million out of his stake in the company. Did a great job too and a lovely fellow. If only all Rich Listers were like him.

Andrew and Richard Rogers: owners of the retail menswear chain, Roger David, which was inherited from their father Kalman Rogoziniski. Came across them in some City of Melbourne planning battles.

Rockman family: Irvin was the former Melbourne Lord Mayor who got out of the hotel business in the 1990s and together with son Matthew has made more than $100 million from the 2005 float of online classified advertising business Seek.com.

Bob Rose: a Sydney-based property developer. The BRW claimed $200 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $623 million in 2019.

Harry Rosen: former CEO of Melbourne-based pharmaceutical company, Phosphagenics, he owned shares worth about $55 million at one point.

Michael Rosenbaum: co-founder of DealsDirect.com.au, which sells almost anything through its online store. Their stock is obtained straight from the manufacturer to keep prices down for their customers. Made BRW Young Rich List.

David Roseman: former Macquarie Bank executive director and head of Australian Infrastructure who made tens of millions during his time at the bank.



Iain Ross
: former managing director of the Worley Parsons hydro-carbons division who owned 466,777 shares worth almost $25 million when the stock peaked at almost $58 in December 2007.

Julia Ross: founder and managing director of Australia's largest independent recruitment company, Ross Human Directions, of which she owned about 37.2m shares. The stock peaked at almost 78c in February 2007 when her stake was worth almost $30 million. The BRW claimed $81 million in 2010.

Joseph Ross: a major provider of joint-venture funds for the Gold Coast property industry, this Sydney-based investor owned 50% of the Chevron Renaissance building in Surfers Paradise, which was sold for about $60 million. He owned 9m shares in CVC Ltd which had the other 50% of the Renaissance. Also uses a company called LJK Nominees to hold shares, and has been or is a top 20 shareholder in Computershare, Commander Communications, Prime Infrastructure, Macquarie Leisure, Gazal and Powerlan. Through LJK Nominees he was one of the Babcock & Brown “foundation” shareholders, with some 2.8m shares which are now worthless.

Stephen Ross de Belle: an Australian investment banker with the likes of ABN Amro and Barclays who went on to become managing director of Midwest Corp with shares worth more than $20 million when the Chinese government paid top dollar in 2008.

Gregory Rosshandler: former managing director who built Finewrap, the largest single Flexographic print packaging company in Australia, to sales of $170 million and sold it in 2006.

Zac and Thelma Rossi: former op 20 shareholders of Paladin Energy with 1.7m shares or 0.28%. The stock peaked at almost $10.70 in June 2007 when he was worth more than $15 million.

Roth family: tenacious property developers, brothers John and Stanley Roth have added to their large Sydney property portfolio which was created by their father Henry Roth. Owning buildings in Sydney's CBD and surrounds, they have expanded into creating Italian gelato chain, Gelatissimo. The BRW claimed $243 million in 2010.

James Rothel: former chief scientific officer of Cellestis, developers and marketers of QuantiFERON technology products for medical diagnosis and scientific research, who owned 12m shares worth more than $50m when the stock peaked at almost $4.70 in February 2006.

John Rothfield: Dr Turf is best known for his punting commentary in the media but is also an astute property investor in Melbourne worth more than $20 million.

Garry Rothwell: The Australian valued at $514 million in 2019.

John Rothwell: the former managing director and largest shareholder of Perth-based ship builder Austal who at one point owned shares worth more than $100 million.

Bruce Rowan: a veteran in the mining sector, he has substantial holdings in the Sunvest Corporation and the Central African Mining & Exploration Co. The BRW claimed $110 million in 2010.

Douglas Rowe: sold his metal recycling business Southern Recyling to listed CMA for $40 million in 2006 and was then later fired as CMA CEO and established a new competing firm in 2010 as this story in The Age, on August 15 2010, revealed.

Reg Rowe: the value of his wealth was helped with the float Super Cheap Auto stores in 2004 which is now Super Retail Group. The BRW claimed $320 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $870 million in 2019.

Trevor Rowe: the long-time investment banker paid more than $10 million for an apartment in James Packer's Barangaroo casino development in 2020.

Kerry & Rowena Szeszeran-McEvoy: run the Australian Institute of Fitness, which are training colleges, and are looking to open campuses for foreign students to cash in on international interest. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Graeme Rowley: the former Rio Tinto executive who became operational boss of Fortescue Metals and made close to $100 million on his shares.

Peter and Mark Rowsthorn: owner of the state-of-the-art Wadham Park stables in Victoria. Peter and his son Mark were also part of the winning team of Toll Holdings that secured the acquisition of Patrick Corporation in a vicious takeover. Mark later ran debt-laden Asciano. The BRW claimed $1.09 billion in 2010 but it has dropped from that.

Michael Ruane
: former director of Reward Minerals who owned 22.8 million shares worth more than $40 million when the stock peaked at almost $2 in July 2008.

Richard Rubin: South African migrant who had a business called Panache World based in Melbourne's eastern suburbs. In South Africa 20 years ago he invented the in-built hairdryers and mini clothes dryers that are now in hotels around the world. He was a millionaire by 21, first Rolls Royce at 22, first jet by 25, a 737 by 30, followed by three heart attacks by 32.

John and Calogero Rubino: ran the mining, oil and gas services company Monadelphous Group and together owned 6m shares worth more than $100m when the stock peaked at almost $17.50 in November 2007.

Ian Runge: founder of Brisbane-based mining software and consulting company Runge which floated in 2008, raising $50 million but leaving the family still in control and worth almost $100 million.

Geoffrey Rush: the first Australian-born person to win an Academy Award for acting. Ongoing earning capacity hurt by defamation battle with News Corp, plus his own actions which lead to that.

Sarina Russo: founder and managing director of the education, recruitment and investment companies that form the Sarina Russo Group. She has achieved great success as an educator, businesswoman and property owner. She owns a portfolio of both commercial and residential properties in Brisbane.


Angelo Russo: the Brisbane-based City Motor Auctions boss collected a then record $18.5 million when selling his clifftop residence on Leopold Street in Brisbane's swanky Kangaroo Point in 2016.

Rodney Rutherford: a top shareholder in Kagara Zinc who owned about 3m shares worth $20 when the stock peaked at almost $7.60 in September 2006 before later taking a tumble.

Gerry Ryan: founder of caravan manufacturing business Jayco who also sits on the board of NRL club Melbourne Storm. In early 2010 he purchased some property in Toorak for around $18 million. The Australian valued at $488 million in 2019.

Alan Rydge: ownership of Greater Union Cinemas and the Rydges hotel chain through the old Amalgamated Holdings are the main source of his wealth, along with a hugely valuable waterfront landbank in Point Piper. The BRW claimed $277 million in 2010. The AFR valued him at $1.58 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.32 billion in 2019.

Matthew Ryland: co-founder of Greencape Capital, a boutique fund manager with more than $10 billion under management. Sold around 40% to Challenger in a couple of tranches and paid $32m dividend in 2018-19 alone. Equity worth plenty more.

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Alek Safarian: a biotech veteran who grew up in Sydney and is now based in London running his own biotech investment company Alsa Holdings.

Antony Sage: emerged in 2008 as a 6.4% or 20.6 million shareholder in cashed up former wannabe iron-ore producer Cape Lambert Iron which sold its project to the Chinese government for $400 million at the top of the market. Later bought the Perth Glory A League franchise.

Nabi Saleh: co-founder of Gloria Jean's coffee retail outlets and was a Hillsong elder who sat on the Hillsong board. Since obtaining the Australian rights for the business, he grew the chain aggressively to revenues of close to $100m a year.

Radek Sali: former CEO of Swisse Vitamins who was valued at $386 million by The AFR in 2019.

Philip Salter: the co-founder of listed print marketing company Salmat who owned 36m shares worth more than $150m when the stock peaked at $5.20 in August 2007. The BRW claimed $280 million in 2010.

Carlo Salteri and family
: for 35 years, he built up his highly successful company Transfield, along side Franco Belgiorno-Nettis. It was broken up in 1997, which left him with the defence industries arm of the company which was re-named Tenix and sold to British Aerospace in 2008 for about $800 million. The 2010 BRW claims $1.33 billion. Forbes valued at $US970m in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $1.84 billion in 2019.

Mario Salvo:
in 2004 he sold the $40 million-plus Delta/Europcar business to Malaysian venture capitalists. He started his Delta car rental business in 1988 with 100 old bombs. When he sold the business he had a fleet of 7000 cars.

David Same:
his father Saul Same founded the Gloweave empire in Melbourne and also pioneered fundraising breakfasts for Melbourne's Jewish business community with the Labor Party in the 1950s, as The Age reported shortly before the 2010 election.

Graeme Samuel
: made plenty as an investment banker with Macquarie Bank in the 1980s but then devoted himself to community causes while retaining an interest in Grant Samuel and also making heaps in the Austexx property joint venture with his two former best friends and Rich Listers, Liberty Oil co-owners David Wieland and David Goldberger. The DFO side of this business eventually imploded under the weight of debt.



Christine Santic: estranged wife of Tony Santic, Port Augusta tuna king and owner of record breaking Melbourne Cup winner Makybe Diva, who reportedly secured an Australian record separation payout of $125 million.

Tony Santic: the Port Lincoln businessman built his wealth through large tuna quota holdings which he sold half of in 2003 when prices were peaking. Famously, he is the owner of one of Australia's most successful race horse, Makybe Diva and also subject to a hugely expensive divorce.

Luke Saracini: the Perth-based property developer was the owner of Saracen Properties and Saracan Estates winery. In 2010 the BRW claimed $288 million.

Saragossi family: Joe Saragossi married the daughter of Brisbane entrepreneur, George James, following his service with the US army during WWII. He built the company G.James Glass & Aluminium into a strong business turning over a $1 million a day. The BRW claimed $202 million in 2010.

Ralph Sarich: beginning with the Orbital Engine Corporation, a company set up to market the orbital piston engine, Ralph sold out in 1992 and turned his attention to property development, creating his company Cape Bouvard Investments. He owns commercial buildings in Melbourne and Perth, where he developed the Icon project which was the largest luxury apartment tower in WA. The 2010 BRW claimed $1.13 billion. The Australian valued at $978 million in 2019

Sam Sarin: as the longest-serving tuna boss in Port Lincoln, he also owns the largest tuna operation there. In 2010 the BRW claimed he was removed from the list due to falling valuations.

Nigel Satterley: owner of the Perth-based Satterley Property Group that sells house-and-land packages. The BRW claimed $400 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $423 million in 2019.

Saunders family: the late John Saunders opened a small delicatessen in Western Sydney with friend Frank Lowy in 1958. A year later they opened the first Westfield shopping centre before the partners split in the 1980s. Continuing property investment has grown the Saunders family wealth, but not nearly as quickly as the Lowys who are worth more than $6 billion. The BRW claimed $779 million in 2010. The AFR valued his children, Betty Klimenko and Monica Saunders-Weinberg, at $2.73 billion in 2019.

Clive Savage: sold out of Clive Peters to JB-Hi Fi some years ago before then trading in Queensland as Clive Anthony where he had a handful of stores competing with Harvey Norman.

Duncan Saville: once wealthy fund manager who has punted badly backing struggling transport ticketing company ERG and was then stalking Allco Finance Group's failed Rubicon trusts. Not sure he has $20m left.

John Savio: the Stanthorpe-based apple grower is cashed up and flying after negotiating the purchase of an office tower in Brisbane for $88 million in 2008.

Sam Savvas: the founder of WOW sight and sound electronic superstores. Moreover, he also moonlights as a property developer through his SSI Group. Reported to be worth upward of $200 million.

James Sawyer
: a large grain farmer from Dalwallinu in WA who built up a solid stake in AWB shares before selling out in a foreign takeover.


Ron Sayers: founded Perth-based mining services company Ausdrill in 1987 and owned 34m shares worth more than $80m when the stock peaked at $2.90 in May 2007. Later pursued for tax fraud by the ATO.

Anthony Scali: major shareholder with about 41.5m shares of Nick Scali, Australia's largest importers and suppliers of quality furniture. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in September 2007 when he was worth more than $100 million, bottomed at 50c in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.50.

Peter Scanlon: the former right hand man to John Elliott and one of the main shareholders of Patrick Corporation who benefitted enormously from the waterfront reforms and then the later high-priced takeover from Toll Holdings. The BRW claims $640 million. The Australian valued at $840 million in 2019.

Mario Scerri: a director of the Scerri Hotel Group which owns three hotels that got caught up with the failed Sovereign Hotels Group.

John Schaffer: former chairman of the Perth-based leather and building products company Schaffer Corp, who owned 3m shares worth more than $25m when the stock peaked at $9.50 in February 2008.

John Schaeffer: arriving in Australia from Holland in 1959, he was Australia's richest cleaner when Tempo Services became Australia's biggest contract cleaners but then suffered a humiliating margin call and had to sell his mansion and art holdings before the company was sold as well. His wealth may have recovered to exceed $20m but we're not sure.

Fred Schebesta: founder of successful finder.com website who in 2020 had been linked with a consortium looking to buy AAP.

Scheinberg family: since selling their flagship Best & Less retail chain, they have focused on expanding their property holdings. Were indirectly blamed for sending McWilliams wine broke in early 2020 courtesy of an onerous warehouse lease in Sydney's Chullora. The BRW claimed $284 million in 2010.

Schiavello family: brothers Joe and Tony are thought to be more than $100 million through their company which has a large share of the Australian office fit-out market, plus a growing property development business in Melbourne. The Australian valued at $437 million in 2019.

Bruno Schiavi: has made his fortune through retail ventures and having an MO of joining with celebrities and developing products. This has included a lingerie line teamed with Janet Jackson and a men's underwear range partnered with Brett Lee.

Jeffrey and Karen Schiller:
held shares in the likes of Medusa Mining and Independence Group which suggest they are worth more than $20m.

Les Schirato: owned food and beverage company Cantarella Bros, which in turn owns Vittoria Coffee (the largest coffee company in Australia). Cantarella is debt free and has turnover of more than $100 million. Coffee has huge margins, so this business is an absolute cash cow.

John Schubert: the former chairman of CBA and long term director of BHP-Billiton made plenty when UK concreting giant Hanson took over his Pioneer International a few years back. He was CEO. His really big earner was Worley Parsons. Back in 2003-04, Schubert's last full year as Worley chairman, he was only paid $110,000 but owned 1.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $54 in December 2007 this stake, if retained, would have been more than $40 million.

Schumann family: big players in the resort business who have spent $40 million upgrading the Silver Star Mountain Resort in Canada since buying it in 2001 and a further $128 million upgrading the Big White resort in Canada.

Adam Schwab: Melbourne-based co-founder of Luxury Escapes with an estimated wealth exceeding $200 million.

Schwartz family: Jerry Schwartz, son of Eve Schwartz, is the sole family member director of his family's company. They own hotels in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra. He is also a qualified laser and cosmetic surgeon. The BRW claimed $258 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $468 million in 2019.

Alan and Carol Schwartz: The Australian valued at $409 million in 2019. Carol is the daughter of billionaire Marc Besen who sits on boards including Stockland and the Reserve Bank.

Adam Scott: Australia's best young golfer with annual earnings around $8 million and a personal wealth of more than $25 million.

Will Scott: the former CommQuest CEO was worth about $15 million when the shares peaked after its 2007 float, but subsequently dived. The company foolishly spent $1m on a Paris Hilton party in Sydney.

Ines Scotland: former CEO of the Sydney-based Citadel Resource Group, who owned about 255m shares. The stock peaked at almost 39c in August 2008 when she was worth more than $100 million.

Russell Scrimshaw: former executive director of Perth-based Fortescue Metals Group who owned about 8m shares when the stock peaked at almost $12.80 in July 2008.

John Scull: a director of Bigtincan Holdings who pocketed $3.83 million selling down his stake in early 2020 but retains 11 million shares worth around $10 million in late February 2020.

Donald Seaton: began as a commodity trader with Gardner Smith in the 1950s and eventually bought the business from which he has now retired but remains a large shareholder.

Norm Seckold: mining entrepreneur, former chairman and managing director of Bolnisi Gold, in 2008 he withdrew $95 million worth of stock out of Opes Prime, triggering the unravelling of the fraud and the eventual collapse of the securities lender. He also owned around 34m shares in Kings Minerals which peaked at $1.10 in June 2007 before diving.

Frank Seeley: Adelaide's "Mr Cool" invented and developed the world's first all plastic, non-corrosive evaporative cooler in the 1970s. Today, his privately-owned company has an annual turnover of $100 million, directly employs 450 people, exports to 75 countries and owns subsidiaries in the US, France, Spain, and Asia.

Julian Segal: former CEO of Incitec Pivot and Caltex who was paid more than $10 million by both companies.

Vivek Seghal: The Australian valued him at $6.089 billion in 2019.

Jim Selkirk: controls Selkirk Bricks, Victoria's largest brick manufacturer, which has been running for more than 120 years.

Alan Senior
: pocketed $23 a share from Xstrata for his 310,210 shares in Jubilee Mines when the business was sold.

Leon Serry: prominent investor in several Melbourne bio-tech plays such as Circadian.

Helen Sewell: co-founder of Great Southern Plantations who sold 25m shares at about $1.60 a pop in March 2001 when she retired from the board.

Kevin Seymour: a board member and substantial shareholder in Tattersall's after the Unitab merger, he is also a substantial Brisbane property developer with his private company the Seymour Group. The BRW claimed $565 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $874 million in 2019.

David Shafer:
the CFO and co-founder of Kogan.com started off with a 30% stake which has generated personal wealth exceeding $100 million over the past decade, especially as the stock soared in 2020.

Shahin family: Adelaide family with controlling interest in Peregrine Corporation, a convenience retailer and the operator of Smokemart & GiftBox retail sites across the country who have now moved into shopping centres. The Australian valued them at $1.844 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued them at $1.49 billion. The Australian valued at $1.84 billion in 2019

Shannon family: sold the Captain Cook pokies hotel in Botany for a reported $17 million in early 2020.

Annette Sharp: once married to John Singleton and produced three children. Their marriage lasted less than 10 years, but her settlement was estimated to be $50 million.

Bob Sharpless: the co-founder and MD of one of Australia's largest residential land developments. Greater Springfield, in Brisbane's south-western suburbs has around 15,000 residents, with future growth geared towards 30,000 residents. The Australian valued at $553 million in 2019.

Chris and Graham Shaw: substantial owners of Direct Group which specialises in direct marketing and runs television channels, including TVSN and EXPO on pay-TV.

Doug Shears: a mover and shaker in Australian agribusiness. The once owner of Uncle Tobys and juice maker Berri, he nows spends most of his time enjoying the fruits of his work. The BRW claimed $306 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $351 million in 2019.

Sheezel family
: own GPI, the diversified distributor and manufacturer of everything from corporate uniforms to bicycles.

David Shein and family
: founder of the information technology company Com Tech, he has since sold out to Dimension Data and had a brief stint on the Fairfax board. The BRW claimed $242 million in 2010.

Tony Shepherd
: the former Transfield C
EO turned non-executive chairman owned 1.6m shares which peaked when the stock hit $16 in November 2007 before later tumbling.


Peter Shepherd: successful Melbourne shoe retailer who almost made it to Lord Mayor of Melbourne in 2001 and also ran for the Myer board in 2002.

Richard Sheppard: long-time deputy managing director of Macquarie Bank who owns shares worth almost $200 million. Now a professional director including chair of Dexus.

Ivan Sher: had a small stake in the original Vodafone licence in Australia which earned him more than $40 million.

Brian Sherman: co-founder of the funds management group Equitilink which he sold in a bear market and also had a great run as a substantial shareholder in Channel Ten after his consortium took control with a $90m equity injection in 1992-93. Now best known for his art collecting and animal liberation campaigning.

Peter Sherwin: another successful Top End farmer who sold out in the good times. Sold Alroy Downs on the Barkly Tableland for $70 million, three years after he bought it for $30 million.

Malcolm Shippen:
Melbourne stockbroker who led the purchase of Rod Price's former North Tahara property near Wagga Wagga for about $10 million in 2010.

Ian and Camilla Shippen: Riverina farmers who paid $37 million for western Victoria grazing property Mt Fyan in late 2018.

Brad Shofer
: co-founder of the software group MYOB he has since stepped down from his executive role but remained a large shareholder until the takeover by Archer Capital.


Fraser Short: already owns hotels, restaurants and bars in partnership with pokies baron Arthur Laundy – so why not throw in one of Australia's most famous food farms? Short bought The Farm at Byron Bay from owners Tom and Emma Lane in 2020.

Alan Shortall: former CEO of US-based Unilife Medical Solutions. He owned shares that were worth more than $18 million in March 2010.

Max Shroder: a former top 20 shareholder of of listed education provider Navitas, formerly known as IBT Education, with 9.4m shares. Business was taken over in 2019.

Phillip Sidney: former managing director of Melbourne-based renewable energy product manufacturer Quantum Energy who owned 683m shares which peaked in value at $65 million when the stock hit 15c in December 2006 before later weakening.

Peter and Wayne Sidwell: successful advertising and printing entrepreneurs through Shomega which was sold to PMP in 1996. Then went on to build listed company Wellcome which was sold in 2019-20.

Avi Silver: co-founder of Hawthorn-based United Petroleum and also a significant property investor and developer in his own right.

Nicholas Silverthorn: former director of NRW Holdings who owned 21.4m shares which peaked in value at $90 million when the stock hit $3.50 in November 2007 before later tumbling, only to return to the ASX200 in 2019.

Karl Simich: former managing director of Sandfire Resources who owned shares worth around $13 million in March 2010.

Ruth Simon: co-owner of the electrical-device maker HPM Industries. The BRW claimed $285 million in 2010.

John Simpson: Founder of property developer Summit Homes. Was valued at $454 million by The AFR in 2019.

James Simpson: former senior executive at Platinum Asset Management who sold his shares for more than $30 million and went on to purchase a $7.1 million new house in Birchgrove NSW.

David Sinclair: pathologist and professor at Harvard Medical School, he is a co-founder of Sirtris Pharmaceuticals which was sold to global giant GlaxoSmithKline in 2007 for a reported $1.1 billion.

Billy Singh: a wealthy Queensland banana grower who in 2010 added to his portfolio with the $3 million purchase of a plantation near Bundaberg which Timbercorp had bought for an inflated $9 million in 2006.

Dan Single: co-founder of the high fashion label and highly successful Ksubi. A keen surfer who has diversifed into other areas including Baddies Bar in New York.

John Singleton: making his fortune through his old advertising company STW Communications, he also has a strong interest in the horse racing industry owning Strawberry Hill Stud. Made plenty investing in 2GB, Lonely Planet and the Magic Millions business on the Gold Coast. The BRW claimed $230 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $476 million in 2019.

Maha Sinnathamby: a former civil engineer, he is behind the building of a new city in south-east Queensland, the Greater Springfield development. The BRW claims $571 million. The Australian valued him at $1.660 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.66 billion in 2019

Robert Skinner: a former Deutsche Bank Australia director who in 2010 listed his waterfront mansion in Mosman for sale with pundits tipping it would fetch more than $13 million.

Brad Skelton: founded ST Group, a heavy machinery transportation company which operates across Australia. The company took off when they were called in to shift around 95% of the machinery used in building the new Hong Kong airport. Made BRW Young Rich List.

David Slack
: former County Natwest fund manager who co-founded Portfolio Partners in 1994 and then flogged it to Norwich Union for more than $100 million in 1998. This deal was also the best earner that Andrew Kroger, younger brother of Liberal powerbroker Michael Kroger, enjoyed during his investing career.

Bevan Slattery
: co-founder and managing director of PIPE Networks, Australia's largest peering provider who owned 8m shares before it was sold. Now owns shares worth about $200 million in listed company Megaport, where he is executive chairman.

Terry Smart: a long time executive at JB Hi Fi who has made more than $30 million out of his shareholding which was 1.7m shares or 1.63% of the company in 2010.

Peter Smedley's family: the late former CEO of Mayne and Colonial made about $25 million out of the CBA takeover and then went on to be a professional director. His son Nicholas has run into some trouble in as a property developer so not sure the family fortune is intact.

Ian Gowrie-Smith: pharmaceuticals entrepreneur best known for establishing SkyePharma and Medeva.

Greg Smith: former managing director of Clive Peeters electrical discount chain who owned 41.7 million shares worth $140 million when the stock peaked at $3.50 in May 2007. Business subsequently collapsed after a $20 million fraud by a female payroll officer so not sure the fortune is above $20 million.

Mark Smith: former exploration manager of Mt Martha-based Karoon Gas who owned 2m shares worth about $16m when the stock peaked above $8.

Mike Smith: British import who was paid more than $40 million to run ANZ and then decided to stay in Australia on retiring.

Richard Smith: owner of PFD Foods which he has worked with for 60 years. The Australian valued at $917 million in 2019.

Rod Smith: former director of Windimurra Vanadium who sold up his 11.4 million shares in the 2007-08 financial year.

Tony Smith
: former Sydney Swan and co-founder of resort management company BreakFree, which he vended into doomed property company MFS. Much of the price was paid in MFS shares subject to a margin loan, and when MFS collapsed he lost around $60 million. This prompted a fire sale of assets including two harbour front properties in Sydney for $11.3 million, plus his half-built Gold Coast mansion.

Smorgon family: Ukraine migrants that have built a $2 billion-plus empire, spanning meat processing, packaging, glass and plastics, after opening a single butcher shop in Melbourne. The BRW claimed $2.44 billion in 2010.

Michael Smurfit: was a part-owner of Melbourne Cup winners Vintage Crop and Media Puzzle. Smurfit bought half of Kevin Bamford's Label Makers business in the early 1990s.

Terry Snow: an influential and charitable member of the Canberra community, in 1998 he purchased the city's airport and surrounding sheep paddocks from the Federal Government for just $66 million before embarking on a huge redevelopment program. The BRW claimed $675 million in 2010. The AFR valued him at $1.86 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.51 billion in 2019

Kong Chong Soon: former chairman of the WA-based property development company United Overseas Australia whose stake in the business is worth more than $50 million.

Nicole Sorbara: Macquarie Group chief operating officer. Total 2018-19 pay of $7 million and also made many millions on her shareholding.

David Southon: co-founder and former joint managing director of the Charter Hall property group who owned 8.7m shares when the stock peaked at around $3.20 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $25 million, before it fell badly.

Roy Spagnolo: the former Parramatta Eels chairman is quite a property player and sold an industrial site tenanted to Bunnings in the Sydney suburb of Rockdale for $25 million in 2009. The AFR reported that Roy is known for his links with “the Italian Connection”, a group of Sydney developers including Tony Zappia, Vince Lombardo and George Gaitanos.

Tony Spanos:
his father made the family name in the meat export business from a processing factory in Botany Road, South Sydney. Sold his waterfront property known as the Boatshed at McMahons Point for more than $7 million.




Spencer family: made plenty through the Stargate group, a mortgage origination business, although suffered a hit during the GFC.

Vernon Spencer: former Chairman of Interstar Securities, one of the largest non-bank finance originators in the country. He sold out to Challenger in 2004 for a rumoured $85 million. Before that, he was easily making $10 million a year. Has one of the biggest boats moored in Melbourne.

Spooner family: owner of Melbourne's Caribbean Gardens markets and surrounding business park, it has been a solid contributor to the family's wealth. More recently, the family has interests in boat manufacturing and the St Kilda marina in Melbourne. The BRW claimed $519 million in 2010.

Howard Stack: a Brisbane-based property investor who once sold a Surfers Paradise beachfront property for $15 million, and then turned around and purchased a neighbouring property for $6.8 million. Paid a record $14.25 million for a Mirvac waterfront penthouse.

Gary Stafford: the former managing director of PanAust owned 11m shares in the company. The stock peaked at $1.25 in May 2008 when he was worth more than $13 million.

Trevor St Baker: controls Queensland-based ERM Power and also made hundreds of million picking up cheap power station assets off the NSW Government. The Australian valued at $556 million in 2019.

Russell Staley: former executive director of Worley Parsons, and still holds a large share parcel, is now chairman of Benthic Geotec. The stock peaked at almost $54 in June and again in December 2007 when he was worth more than $40 million, bottomed at $11 in December 2008 but recovered to almost $24 in January 2010. The BRW claimed $265 million in 2010.

Guido Staltari:
executive chairman of Saracen Minerals and largest individual shareholder with a stake of around 8% which in July 2010 equated to $15m.

Harry Stamoulis: property developers with a penchant for disused and un-loved commercial properties across metropolitan Melbourne. The business was started by patriarch Spiro Stamoulis before his death in 2007, so son Harry is now in charge. The BRW claimed $411 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $769 million in 2019.

Clive Standish: successfully ran the Australian operation of UBS in the 1990s and was promoted to be finance director of the Zurich-based banking giant before getting fired in 2007 for his part in the sub-prime disasters that required a bailout from the Singapore Government and then the Swiss government.

Martin Stanely: head of Macquarie Asset Management. Total 2018-19 pay of $5.5 million and also made millions from his shareholding.

Steele family: has an interest in 355 Victorian poker machines generating more than $30 million annually from gamblers a few years back.

Stehr family: controls 80% of the listed Clean Seas Tuna and owns about 87m shares. The stock peaked at almost $2.10 in February 2008 when they were worth more than $170 million, before tumbling. The BRW claimed $271 million a few years back.

Malcolm Steinberg: the one-time king of pinball machines, his wealth grew from the establishment of the Timezone amusement arcades.

Darren Steinhardt: ran financial planning business Infocus, and builds the brand around the motto to keep your financial status healthy. There are also two other companies integrated into Infocus, Platformplus and Portfoliofocus, which both concentrate on selling software to companies. Made BRW Young Rich List.

David Stevens: co-founded Brennan, a leader in telecommunications and information technology services which focuses on the mid-market. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Dominic Stevens: former CEO of Challenger Financial Services, who was pocketing more than $3 million a year and owned about 7.5m shares. The stock peaked at almost $6.60 in October 2007 when he was worth more than $42 million, bottomed at $1.20 in December 2008 and then recovered. Went on to make many more millions as CEO of the ASX.

Mark Stevens
: former on-executive director of Jeanswest, which went broke in 2020. Was going to move to a newly built mansion in Toorak a few years back before deciding against relocating his family from their Park Orchards property, and instead selling the Toorak property for more than $6 million.

David Stewart: the former chief executive of Leighton Holdings who has made plenty over more than 20 years with the construction giant.

Charles Stinger: owned more than $10 million worth of shares in Probiotic.

Linda Stipanicev: a Perth-based company director who in 2011 placed her Peppermint Grove mansion near the Swan River on the market expecting about $10 million.

Andrew Stock: significant shareholder in Origin Energy, with around 463,00 shares. The stock peaked at almost $18 in November 2008 when he was worth more than $8 million, bottomed at $7.50 in February 2008 and then recovered.

Paul Stoddart: the founder of the failed OzJet airline, he moved into formula one and successfully sold his Minardi team. His big break came from a mega spare parts purchase from the Australian Defence Forces in the late 1980s. The BRW claimed $230 million in 2010.

Kerry Stokes: well known for his media interests with Seven Network and, more recently, WA News. Biggest earner over the years has been the Caterpillar franchise in WA, which has now extended to NSW and Northern China. The 2010 BRW claimed $2.29 billion. The Australian valued him at $5.384 billion in 2019. The AFR said $5.69 billion in 2019.


Josh Stollman: made his first fortune out of IT in Germany and then arrived in Australia in 2004 and was the founding CEO of payments disruptor Tyro. Now lives in Sydney and retains a 4% stake worth about $70 million in September 2020.

Casey Stoner: worth more than $20 million after a career riding motorbikes.

Michael Stork: a former non-executive director of Patrys Antibody treatments group and associated with technology investor PNK Holdings.

Ric Stowe: the Monaco-based owner of Griffin Coal, which was one of only two coal producers on the west coast. In 2009 the BRW claims $875 million, but in 2010 has fallen off with his company in liquidation.

Terry Streeter:
the former Western Areas chairman made a fortune on a 1998 nickel tenement deal with his old colleagues but in July 2009 the WA Supreme Court ordered he pay $66 million in compensation suggesting all was not right with the deal and his wealth may be in decline. In 2010 the BRW claimed $152 million.

Charles Stringer: chief executive of Probiotic, his share wealth in March 2010 was around $12 million.

Horst Struve: appeared on the Silex Systems register with a handy 2.8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $13 in June 2007 when his stake was worth more than $30 million, but in early 2019 it was wallowing at 18c.

Grant Stuart:
with the assistance of Russ Becker, R.A. Becker & Co the importers of B and C grade movies, documentaries and the Bold and the Beautiful, purchased Broadcast Rentals from the liquidators of ISIS - a failed dot com venture. Grant is one of the biggest players in the lucrative broadcast equipment hire business, and he resides in rural Victoria in Hepburn Springs, in a house that he paid $6 million for.

Manny Stul: CEO of Moose toys, The AFR valued him at $1.6 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.01 billion in 2019

Brendan Sullivan: successful property investor based in Melbourne who came into the public eye when his wife, Tessa Sullivan, was sexually harassed by former Lord Mayor Robert Doyle.

Sullivan family: wealthy farmers who sold their 1426 hectare Boggabilla property Mullala to listed Prime Ag for $15.1 million in 2008.

Alex Sundich: former director of Eastern Star Gas who owned about 10m shares when Santos launched a 90c takeover bid.

Sutton family: opening his first car dealership after WWII, Sir Frederick Sutton began building towards owning the largest network of Holden dealerships in Australia. Sir Frederick passed away in 2004 and his daughter Laurie Sutton inherited. The BRW claimed $328 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $802 million in 2019.

Gillian Swaby
: former company secretary of Paladin Energy had a share wealth of $60 million before the Lift Capital administrators controversially sold her up. Paladin shares later crashed so this might have been a good thing.


Sam Swanell: the CEO and co-founder of ASX-listed Pointsbet whose 3.2 million shares were worth about $40 million in September 2020. He cut his teeth running Tote Tasmania and Tomwaterhouse.com.

Jonathan Sweeney: former managing director of Trust Company Limited who owned 594,344 shares when the stock peaked at almost $15 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $20 million.

Swick family: Kent and Rosanne Swick ran the Perth-based Swick Mining Services and owned 26m shares worth around $50m when the stock peaked at almost $2.20 in November 2007.

John Symond: in 1992, Symond introduced himself to mortgage broking. Sensing Australians were fed up with big banks' disdain for service, he pounced on the opportunity and established Aussie Home Loans. The BRW claimed $454 million although he's taken a hit through the credit crunch and partially sold out to the Commonwealth Bank. During the post-GFC downturn he purchased Wizard Home Loans for just $26 million then sold it to GE for $400 million in 2004. The Australian valued at $691 million in 2019.

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Collis and Cyan Ta'eed: The Australian valued at $600 million in 2019.

Anton Tagliaferro: arriving from Malta in 1984 he had stints at Perpetual and Prudential before moving on to set up his own business, Investors Mutual. The BRW claimed $240 million in 2010.

Talbot family: the late mining entrepreneur Ken Talbot died in a 2010 air crash when visiting an African mine. His family inherited a wide range of stakes in a variety of mining companies which in total has left them with more than $1 billion.

Basil Tambanis: former managing director of Melbourne-based gold explorer, Goldminex Resources, he owned about 8.8m shares when the stock peaked at almost $1.80 in August 2008.

Tan family: have owned and run the successful Slades soft drink business in the Melbourne suburb or Thomastown since 2001.

David Tang:
a private property investor who in 2009 paid $44 million to buy the office tower at 82 Northbourne Avenue in Canberra.

Andrew Taplin: managing director of Adelaide-based Taplin Group which added to their commercial property interests by purchasing the Mawson Lakes town centre for a reported $26 million.

Sam Tarascio: owner of Salta Constructions which is currently redeveloping the old Mercy Hospital site in East Melbourne, and also the owner of Preston market. The BRW claims $621 million. The AFR valued him at $1.72 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.38 billion in 2019

Roy Tashi
: has not worked for more than 25 years after selling his glass business to Pilkington for a tidy sum.





Alla and Allen Woof-Tasker
: the owners of the Lake House in the picturesque Victorian town of Daylesford, who purchased the land when it was covered in blackberries. Such a beautiful retreat overlooking the lake is worth plenty.

Ben Tapp and family: after many years bull catching and contract mustering, Ben and his family are settled on Mountain Valley station. The station covers more than 1500sq km on the edge of Arnhemland and they own more than 11,000 head of Brahman cattle. Sold another smaller station for more than $50 million.

Steve Targett: was a main board director of Lloyds TSB in London responsible for wholesale and international banking, but then returned to ANZ in 2004 but has since moved on after missing out on the top job, sparking a $57 million lawsuit against the bank.

Tony Tartak and family: founder of waste management company Bingo Industries. Was valued at $421 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $493 million in 2019.

Greg Tate: the managing director of listed Fleetword Corp, which provides temporary accommodation for the likes of mining companies. Owned about 5.4m shares when the stock peaked at almost $11 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $55 million.

Nick Burton-Taylor: former chair of one of Australia's oldest enterprises the Australian Agricultural Company, his family still owned around 3% or 7.45m shares despite being ousted by the aggressive former 43% shareholder Futuris, which now trades as Elders and subsequently sold down. The stock peaked at almost $3.60 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $21 million, and recovered to around $1.33. In 2010 the BRW claimed $110 million.

Brian Taylor
: of Perth based Plan B Group Holdings, who owned about 18m shares worth $25m when the stock peaked at almost $1.70 in August 2007 before later tumbling.

Jesse Taylor: the Perth-based former chairman of Midwest Corp collected about $20 million selling to the Chinese Government.

Bruce Teele:
former long-serving boss at blue-blood stockbroking firm JB Were who still chairs some of their associated listed investment companies such as Amcil and owns shares in them worth more than $30 million.

David Teoh: founder of TPG Telecom. The Australian valued him at $2.531 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued him at $2.03 billion.

John Terpu:
managing director of Conquest Mining who owned more than 19m shares worth $15m when the stock peaked at almost 90c in May 2007 before falling away.

Julian Tertini: the founder of Freedom Furniture and managing director of Fantastic Furniture who owned a 40% stake. The stock peaked at almost $4.60 in November 2007 when he was worth more than $160 million. In 2010 the BRW claimed $135 million.


Ian Testrow: the CEO of mining contractor Emeco Holdings who owns 15m performance rights which are currently worth more than $30 million if fully vested.

Teys family: run Australia's second largest beef processor, Teys Bros, which mainly operates out of Queensland.

Thomas family: the SA family are the founders of T&R Pastoral, Australia's third-largest meat processor. In 2010 the BRW claimed $180 million. The AFR valued Chris Thomas at $1.39 billion in 2019. The Australian valued Chris at $1.1 billion in 2019

Gavin Thomas: former CEO of mining company Kingsgate whose stake was worth more than $30 million in late 2010.

George Thomas:
a Sydney-based publican whose pub, the Meridian Hotel regularly is at or near the top of turnover rankings for pokies in NSW.

Susan Thomas: A technology entrepreneur who build Flexiplan before selling it to MLC and then popped up in this Director Deeds column for her big investment in RoyalCo Resources.


Barry Roberts-Thompson: the former Hutchison Communications CEO used to be worth more than $200 million before the shares tanked.

Craig Thompson: owner and managing director of Fremantle-based Seacorp shipping, and owner of the Mount Hallowell horse stud south of Perth. Paid $700,000 in January 2010 for a mare, suggesting he's got a few dollars.

Stephen Thompson:
Peter Cooper's 2IC since the start (2002) at booming boutique fund manager Cooper Investments. Owns equity in the business and has received millions in fully franked dividends, salary and bonuses.

Barry Thornton: former chairman of Brisbane-based GWA International who owned 16 million shares worth more than $60m when the stock peaked at $4.70 in April 2007. Was trading around $3.50 in early 2020.

Bob Thorpe: founder and large shareholder who owns about 11.4m shares of mining services giant Ausenco, when the stock peaked at almost $17 in June 2008 valuing his stake at almost $200m.
The BRW claimed $444 million in 2010.

Evan Thornley: together with wife Tracey Ellery, they began the internet search engine LookSmart and were briefly paper billionaires at the peak of the dotcom bubble. Ran Better Place Australia and then globally before the business went bust. In 2020 was working on real estate system reform in Melbourne.

Nick Thyssen: co-founder of Patra orange juice business in the 1970s who did it all again with Original Juice in the 1990s before selling out for $35 million to Golden Circle. Now running the booming Procal milk business.

Tieck family: largely involved in Sydney commercial property and other investments, their wealth was built by their father Norman Tieck who was a partner of the Franklins supermarket chain. The BRW claimed $989 million in 2010.

Ben Tilley: a friend of the Packers, he owns various properties through his company Linkshore and Greenacre Property Holdings and at one point pocketed more than $40 million by selling his Point Piper mansion.

Mike Tilley: the former CEO of Challenger Financial Services made plenty as an investment banker over the years and boasts about owning two properties in Toorak. Currently the chair of Latitude Financial.


Simon Tilley and Nick Wills: joint partners in various pubs including the Greenwood Hotel in North Sydney, the Clovelly Hotel, Verandah Bar in the Sydney CBD and The Elephant Hotel in Brisbane's Fortitue Valley which they bought for more than $20 million in early 2020.

Tobin family: have successfully run Victoria's Tobin Brothers funeral business for more than 80 years.

Paul Tolomeo: was one of three shareholders in Sydney-based Sasso Pre-cast Concrete which was sold to Brickworks for $35 million in March 2010.

Gianfranco Tomasi: founder and chairman of Southern Cross Electrical Engineering owns about 61m shares or 51%. The stock peaked at almost $1.85 in December 2007 when he was worth more than $110 million.

Neil Tomkinson: former director of Red Hill Iron, who owned more than 3 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $7.30 in May 2008 when he was worth more than $20 million, before it fell away.

Alvin Toms: former director of Straits Resources who owned about 30.6m shares. He sold his stake in 2007 for more than $90 million.

Robert Topfer: former boss of Babcock & Brown's corporate and structured finance activities worldwide and went on to become the controlling shareholder in struggling broker Tricom.


Ian Trahar: former director of the CO2 Group who owned 117m shares worth around $100m when the stock peaked at 93c in December 2007. Also a major investor in Avatar.

Roy Travers: the former tax lawyer for the likes of Alan Bond, Abe Saffron and Abe Goldberg, NSW chess champion and bigwig at Accor Asia-Pacific, who our reliable snout estimates is worth more than $150 million.

Joseph Treacy: former executive director of Perth based Kagara Zinc , who owns about 3m shares or 1.5%. The stock peaked at almost $7.60 in September 2006 when he was worth more than $20 million, but then took a tumble.

Ken Tregonning: former managing director of AED Oil, who owned about 27m shares worth $270m when the stock peaked at almost $11.50 in October 2007 before going south and later going broke.

Peter Trew: Sydney property developer who in 2011 placed his North Curl Curl beachfront mansion on the market expecting $10 million.

Alan Tribe: Owner of IT firm Cebas and franchisee for furniture retailer IKEA. Was valued at $361 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $418 million in 2019.

Harry Triguboff: billionaire Sydney apartment builder through his controversial Meriton group. The 2010 BRW claims $4.20 billion. Forbes valued at $US3bn in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $12.31 billion in 2019.

Nic Trimboli: director and founding shareholder of Fremantle-based Littleworld Beverages, he owns about 4.6m shares. The stock bottomed at $1.15 in December 2008 and recovered to around $2.09.

Matt Tripp: the son of Bob Hawke's former bookmaker Alan Tripp who pocketed an estimated $40 million in late 2010 when Irish firm Paddy Power paid $132.6 million for the 39% of Sportsbet it didn't already own. Made another fortune selling out of Betseasy to The Stars Group in 2020.

Karl and Luke Trouchet: these Brisbane-based brothers purchased their parents' humble campervan business, Apollo Motorhome Holidays, and have turned it into a highly successful venture pushing their wealth above $60 million.

Graham Tuckwell: Canberra born Chairman and CEO of ETF Securities Limited. Was valued at $575 million by The AFR in 2019. The Australian valued at $683 million in 2019.

Aidan & David Tudehope: in the telecommunications business through Macquarie Telecom. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Stephen Tull: co-founder of Perth-based IT out-sourcing company ASG Group who no longer works for the firm but still owns about 12.2m shares or 10% of the company. The stock peaked at almost $1.90 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $20 million, bottomed at 40c in December 2008 and recovered to around $1.29.

Gavin and Sylvia Tulloch: directors of Dyesol with a joint holding of around 21.3m shares. The stock was at $2.10 in July 2007 when they were worth more than $40 million.

Malcolm Turnbull: Australia's richest politician when serving as PM, he built his wealth through share entitlements as the head of the Australian arm of the US investment bank Goldman Sachs and the sale of OzEmail in 1999.

Graham Turner: the founder and major shareholder who owns about 15.7m shares of booming discount travel agency Flight Centre. The BRW claimed $380 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $872 million in 2019

David Tweed: renowned for offering no-value deals to shareholders, although he has broken no law, he has been quoted as saying " I didn't do morals at school". An appalling scavenger worth more than $20 million.


Max Twigg: landfill entrepreneur who sold out to Terry Peabody's Transpacific Industries and owned about 2.8m shares. The stock peaked at almost $14.50 in July 2007 when this stake was worth more than $30 million. Overall wealth tops $100 million as he concentrates on racing Porsches in retirement. Sold The Beach hotel in Byron Bay for $70 million in 2018.

Daniel Tzvetkoff: this Queensland-born millionaire made his fortune from an on-line payment system Instabill. Now business interests are divided between IT and property sub-division and at one point shelled out $28 million for a partially built mansion on the Gold Coast.

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Richard Uechtritz: the former CEO of booming retailer JB Hi-Fi who owned about 3m shares or 2.94% of the company but sold them after retiring and is now back on the board with less than 12,000 shares. Left plenty on the table but still worth more than $20 million.

John Uhrig: the former chairman of CRA and Westpac recently also retired from the board of Adelaide-based communications technology company Codan Ltd after 20 years and owns about 12.1m shares. The stock peaked at almost $1.60 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $40 million, bottomed at 46c in December 2008 before recovering.

Patrick Upfold: Macquarie Group Chief Risk officer and former CFO. Total 2018-19 pay of $7 million and also made many millions on his shareholding.

John Upham: career publican who grew up near Warrnambool, made plenty when pokies were legalised in Victoria in 1991 and in 2009 came out of retirement to buy the Lorne Hotel for almost $20 million.

Keith Urban: singer and songwriter who was born in New Zealand and now lives in Australia with his wife, Nicole Kidman, has a string of recording successes earning him north of $30 million.

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Robert Vagnoni
: former executive director of Murchison Metals owned about 6.8m shares worth more than $25m when the stock peaked at almost $6 in July 2007 before falling away.

Valmorbida family: after migrating to Melbourne in the 1950s, four brothers, Saverio, Mariano, Carlo and Terry, established Conga foods, Valcorp Fine Foods and the Casama Group. Food wholesaling was coupled with ownership of Italian newspapers in Melbourne and Sydney and a national Italian radio network. The BRW claimed $501 million in 2010.

Nick Van de Merwe: a former Pacific Brands marketing guru who bought the Golden Fleet surfwear label in 1999. Listed his Armadale mansion in Melbourne's leafy suburbs to sell for $5.5 million in mid-2010.

John Van Lieshout: ten years after migrating to Brisbane from his native Holland, the Dutch businessman began the furniture chain Super A-Mart in 1970. Slowly building the business over the next 40 years into a large retail chain in Queensland and much of northern NSW. Forbes valued at $US840m in March 2010. The 2010 BRW claims $1.39 billion. The AFR valued him at $2.51 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.62 billion in 2019
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David Veal: the former head of aviation at Allco Finance Group owned 11.35 million shares that peaked in value at $146.2m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.


Robert Velletri: long time managing director of the listed Monadelphous Group, which soared to a record $25 in 2013.

Mario Verrocchi: Co-owners of Chemist Warehouse. Say no more. The Australian valued at $1.47 billion in 2019.

Steve Versteegen: co-founder and CEO of Perth-based contract mining company Pit N Portal which was sold to Emeco Holdings for $72 million in 2020. He was partly paid in equity and will stay with the business.

Will Vicars: Sydney fund manager who owns a big stake in the Caledonia business. The Australian valued at $485 million in 2019.

Mark Viduka: soccer player who did many years earning top dollar in the English Premier League.

Charlotte and Ervin Vidor: realising a need for travellers, they have made their wealth through the Medina chain of serviced apartments. The BRW claimed $500 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $1.25 billion in 2019.

Arnold Vitocco: Property developer. The Australian valued at $750 million in 2019.

Steve Vizard: a canny wheeler dealer who made his first fortune selling Artist Services to Granada but then enjoyed another windfall through the sale of his Toorak mansion for a record $17 million.

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Darrell Wade: co-founder of Melbourne-based Intrepid Travel which has sales of more than $150 million a year.

Peter Wade: former executive chairman of Mineral Resources who owned about 6m shares. The stock went from $7.50 in October 2008 to $1.60 in December 2008 and hit almost $18 in early 2020.
Wagner family: they are based in Toowoomba, Queensland, and control the recently floated construction materials supply business, Wagners. The family also owns a substantial portfolio of commercial and pastoral property holdings. Also made a few million suing toxic shock jock Alan Jones. The BRW claimed $350 million in 2010.

Alex Waislitz: legendary stock picker and formerly married into the Pratt family. The AFR valued him at $1.56 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.46 billion in 2019.

Tony Wales: throughout the 1990s, he was Computershare's chief financial officer which helped make the company a global success and boosted the value of his large stake in the company. He owned 32m shares worth more than $400m at the peak. The BRW claimed $276 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $475 million in 2019.

Lang Walker: he joined his father's small earth moving and quarry business at Sandy Point, south-west Sydney, in the late 1960s. Selling the quarrying business, he gradually refocused the family business to property development, forming his private company, the Walker Corporation. Owning substantial residential and commercial properties in Sydney and Queensland, he first sold the Walker Corporation to Australand in early 2000 but then just kept on developing in a private capacity before largely selling out to Mirvac in 2007. The 2010 BRW claims $1.97 billion. Forbes valued at $US880m in March 2010. The Australian valued him at $3.581 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $3.58 billion in 2019

Ron Walker's family co-founder of Hudson Conway and Crown Resorts, former chairman of Fairfax Media and a former Lord Mayor of Melbourne. Died in 2017. Biggest pay day was Melbourne's Crown Casino. The BRW claimed $427 million in 2010.

Ian Wall: co-founder of the Adelaide-based communications technology company Codan Ltd who owned 35m shares at the peak. First joined the board in 1959.

Jim Wall
: executive chairman of CBH, he is not one to take a backward step when faced with a challenge. When heading junior zinc company Savage Resources, he took on resources giant WMC over the massive Ernest Henry deposit.

Rowan Wall: his Eclipse Property Group sold an office building in Sydney's Ultimo for $31.4 million in 2008.

Ian Waller: the co-founder and former CEO of insurance comparison website Iselect has a stake estimated at $30-$50 million after a capital raising in early 2011 valued the whole business at about $300 million.

Chris Wallin: this Brisbane-based geologist by trade, has made his wealth from mining royalties. He discovered the Copabella mine that was the cornerstone asset for Macarthur Coal. In 2009 he sold his stake in Byerwen Coal to Japan's JFE Steel for a reported $624 million. The 2010 BRW claimed $2.59 billion. The Australian valued him at $2.181 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued him at $1.88 billion.

Danny Wallis
: CEO of IT consulting company DWS who owned 54m shares at the peak. The stock peaked at almost $3.40 in January 2008 when he was worth more than $150 million.

George and Paul Wallner: have been away from the Australian business scene since 1990. In 1982 they founded Hypercom which manufactured point-of-sale products for banks and retailers. They moved the headquarters to Arizona in the US, and have now sold the majority of their stake in the company.

David Walsh: known as “every casino owner's nightmare”, this eclectic Tasmanian has amassed a fortune on the blackjack tables using his mathematical probability skills. Additionally, he also owns an eclectic art collection of over 300 contemporary works worth more than $100 million. Owns MONA in Hobart too and hates the pokies so he's a favourite of ours.

Sam Walsh: Rio Tinto's former Perth-based iron-ore boss saw his pay rocket to a staggering $7.7 million in 2007 alone as profits soared.

Andrew Walsh: the long standing CEO of IRESS who founded one of its predecessor companies and currently owns ordinary shares worth about $7 million, on top a healthy salary and future incentive payments which are in play.

John Walstab: former director of Melbourne-based renewable energy product manufacturer Quantum Energy, who owned 77m shares. The stock peaked at 15c in December 2006. Later shifted into healthcare and also got caught up with the Manly Sea Eagles.

Julian Walter: former home building partner of the late West Australian billionaire Len Buckeridge.

James Wan: creator and director of the Saw series of films which have taken over $400 million at the box office.

Ron Wanless: founder of Wanless Enviro Services specialising in waste recovery and environmental services, the former scrap metal dealer, also has interests in speedcar driving, boxing and polo. He owns an expansive piece of land used solely for his Beaudesert Polo facility which hosted the 2008 Motorline BMW Polo tournament.

Greg Ward: long time Macquarie Group finance director who was paid tens of millions and made more again on his shares.

Brian Singer and Doug Warbrick: with beginnings in a garage on the Victorian surf coast town of Jan Juc, these two went from building surfboards, to building the Rip Curl empire. The BRW claimed $300 million in 2010. Business was sold to Kathmandu for more than $300m in 2019.

Gemma Ward: a catwalk model who commanded up to $200,000 a show and was making $4 million a year at the peak. Also made a successful transition into Hollywood, starring in the horror film The Strangers and other movies.

Ken Warriner: Kerry Packer's long time pastoral manager retained a 10% stake when the giant cattle business was sold for $425 million to UK private equity firm Terra Firma in March 2009.

Helen Watkins: pops up on the Elders share register as one of the biggest retail shareholders which may have a farming connection back to the Futuris days, although we're not sure.

Malcolm Watkins: an executive director of Australian Finance Group (AFG) who sold 6m shares for $15.5 million in late 2019, according to this Director Deeds column.

David Watson: former executive chairman of Perth-based CTI Logistics, who owned 10.4m shares going into the GFC. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in December 2006 when he was worth more than $20 million, but was back at 75c in early 2020. Retired as a non-executive director in 2006.

Naomi Watts: another Australian success story in Hollywood.

Bill Wavish: the former Woolworths finance director made a small fortune from 1.2 million options issued in 1999 at an exercise price of just $5.11. Also made more than $10 million knocking Myer into shape for private equity giant TPG.

Karrie Webb: the best female golfer Australia has ever produced who has cashed in big time on the professional tour.

Phillip Webb: he established Phillip Webb Real Estate in 1972 and it has grown to be recognised as one of the industry leaders throughout the Eastern suburbs of Melbourne. The company specialises in all facets of real estate.

William (Bill) Webb:
former vice chairman and chief operating officer of Philip Morris where he worked for 35 years, including a stint in charge of the huge international division from 1993 to 1997.

Mark Webber: former Australian F1 racing driver who was earning around $8m a year at the peak.

David Wee: founder and CEO of Carepoint Industrial Health Services and of Oceanside Securities, WA, he has interests in Abuzz Technologies, Global Mall Media and Property & Hospitals. Medibank reportedly paid $8 million to buy David Wee's occupational health business Carepoint which was settled in August 2010.

Paul Weightman: long time boss of Queensland-based property investment company Cromwell Corp whose 12m shares have added nicely to his hefty salary.

Amiram and Helen Weinstock:
Sydney property investors and furniture retailers who in 2020 paid $7.5 million for a Bellevue Hill property as an investment whilst retaining their Vaucluse waterfront mansion.

Sam Weiss: a professional director who has chaired booming listed company Altium for many years and owns shares worth more than $50 million.

Gary Weiss: a long-time right hand man to Sir Ron Brierley at corporate raider GPG who is now one of Australia's busiest professional directors.

John Wellam: owner of South Geelong firm Wellam Constructions made his cash in the earth moving business and was rejected when offered $18 million to buy the Geelong Golf Club site in 2010.

Jeromy Wells: floated his cloud communications systems company Whispir in 2019 and his 15% stake was worth more than $30 million in May 2020.

Harvey Went: a former founder of Mincom cashed in his shares pocketing $26.3 million before tax when the mining IT firm was sold to a US buyout firm.

Nathan Werdiger and family: property has driven the riches through the his investment propert company, Juilliard Corporation. The BRW claims $541 million. The AFR valued the Werdiger family at $1.34 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $874 million in 2019

Leanne Wesche
:
founder and managing director of Fremantle-based Pacco Group. Established in 2004, it is now one of Australia's leading fruit and vegetable packing houses.

Chris West: the former co-head of corporate finance at Allco Finance Group owned 10.43 million that peaked in value at $135.5m when the stock cracked $13 in early 2007. Allco collapsed in late 2008 so shares are worthless.

Christopher Westphal:
co-founder and CEO of Sirtris Pharmaceuticals, he teamed up with David Sinclair and developed the business which was then sold to global giant GlaxoSmithKline in 2007 for a reported $1.1 billion.

Leigh Whannell: integral to the hugely successful Saw movies. Leigh began on Neighbours and has risen quickly up the Hollywood ranks.

Vernon Whatley: founder of City Motors Holdings in 1952, he has grown the company into the listed Automotive Holdings Group of which he owned a 26% stake or around 16m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.50 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million. In 2010 the BRW claimed $182 million.

Alex Wheeler: a large grain farmer from Coonamble in NSW who held a solid stake in AWB shares before the business was taken over.

Tony and Maureen Wheeler: founders of Melbourne-based Lonely Planet, which has grown to be the world's largest independent travel publishing company, until the partial sale to the BBC in 2008.

Richard White: The Australian valued the Wisetech founder and controlling at $3.302 billion in 2019.

Peter and Lyndy White: own more than $20 million worth of shares in listed investment company AFIC.

White family: the owner of the Ray White franchise model, who skims the top in franchise fees from every Ray White sale and also made plenty through REA Group, which runs wwwrealestate.com.au.

Terry and Rhonda White: as former President of the Pharmacy Guild, Terry, along with his wife Rhonda, founded the Terry White chemist franchise. They appointed their first franchisee in 1994 and now have over 100 stores from Cairns to Perth with a turnover exceeding $500 million.
Whiteley family: own the successful Dandenong-based company Corex Plastics which in 2012 was inducted into the Victorian Manufacturing hall of fame.

Paul Whiteman: after obtaining a garbage dump for next to nothing, he turned the methane gas into electricity and sold it back into the grid, thus forming, alongside Walter Pahor, Energy Developments Ltd.

Noel Whittaker and Cheryl Macnaught: they established Whittaker Macnaught Financial Planning which they sold to a subsidiary of Royal Bank of Scotland, St Andrew's Australia, for a rumoured figure that was north of $30 million. Noel still writes personal finance columns.

Kevin Whyte
: founder and managing director of The Token Group which is a personal management firm and live touring business working with the finest comedians in Australia. Artists on the books over the years have included Dave Hughes and Rove McManus.

Robert Whyte: every bit a renaissance man who is fluent in several languages. His investment company Audant has made plenty out of property and banks stocks over the years. The BRW claimed $340 million in 2010. The Australian valued at $595 million in 2019.

David Wieland: co-founder of the Solo chain of petrol stations in the 1970s, he has also established Liberty Oil which supplies almost 10% of Australia's fuel needs. He is now a co-owner of the Direct Factory Outlet chain and is involved in other property developments. The BRW claimed $610 million in 2010 although DFO business subsequently ran into trouble.

Michael Wiggins and Joanna Cassar: Sydney based hoteliers. In 2015, bought Oxford Hotel in Sydney for $34 million and later sold it in 2019 for $47.1 million.

Shemara Wikramanayake: CEO of Macquarie Group, with 2018 remuneration of $18 million. Owns 800,000 shares worth $113 million in early 2020.

Mike Wilkins: former Promina and IAG CEO who did particularly well when Suncorp bought Promina. Later sat on boards such as QBE and AMP.

Michael Wilkinson:
Melbourne publisher who also owns a tidy property portfolio.

Shane Wilkinson: started as a tradie, then moved into what he found to be a more efficient job of buying houses and turning them into apartments. He now owns property development company Pace Development Group and operates mainly in Melbourne. Made BRW Young Rich List.

Anthony Willemsen: boss of Canberra-based property developer Willemsen Group. In operation for the past 40 years, he has grown the portfolio to include a large number of Canberra office and hotel buildings.

Ashley Williams:
Melbourne-based property developer has survived the downturn in the commercial property, building a diverse portfolio pushing his wealth north of $120 million. He co-owned, with the late Ron Walker, Evolve Development.

David Williams: Melbourne-based investment banker who enjoyed a tidy pay day from putting together the Tasmanian salmon giant Tassal. Also made plenty as chair of Polynovo and some other medical plays.

Keith Williams: the now retired founder of Seaworld on the Gold Coast and Hamilton Island Resort in the Whitsundays built his personal wealth from nothing to more than $150 million.

Lloyd Williams: his company, Hudson Conway, is best known as the property development company that developed and managed Melbourne's Crown casino. He also owns the highly exclusive Capital Golf Club in Melbourne, reserved for famous and wealthy, and has strong interests in the thoroughbred industry - owning more than 70 race horses. The BRW claims $942 million. Forbes valued at $US610m in March 2010. The Australian valued at $902 million in 2019

Peter Williams:
former director of Ampella Mining whose stake was worth more than $20 million in late 2010.

Rohan Williams: former CEO of Avoca Resources whose stake was worth more than $10 million in late 2010.

Andrew Willink: Cannex founder and current co-owner of Rate City which deals in retail banking products and has been looking to expand.

Glenn Willis:
high-profile investment banker for 25 years, and co-founder of Grange Securities before it was taken over by Lehman Brothers in 2007. Later ran Moss Capital and previously headed the Australian arm of Lehman Brothers, the New York-based investment bank that collapsed last September in the biggest bankruptcy in US history.

Dean Wills: the Ferrari-loving former Coca Cola Amatil boss walked out with an $18 million retirement payout when he left in 1994 and made plenty as a professional director and investor ever since, including from sitting on boards such as Fairfax and Westfield.

Wilson family: controlling shareholders in plumbing supplies company Reece, which has performed brilliantly. The Australian valued them at $3.48 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $3.48 billion in 2019

Brett Wilson: a large grain farmer from Hannaford in Queensland who had a solid holding of AWB shares before the business was taken over.

Geoff Wilson: the fund manager has a direct equity interest in WAM, WLS, WIL and CAM to name a few, plus whatever the funds management business must be worth.

Frank Wilson: taxation lawyer who became founding chairman and major shareholder of Perth-based TFS Corporation which was into forestry and fragrances. He owned 39.8m shares or 21.58% which was worth around $60m when the stock peaked at $1.50 in September 2008. Subsequently renamed Quintis and collapsed after a short selling campaign in 2017. ASIC then went after Frank.

Peter Wilson: managing director of the Spotless Group who owns about 2.7m shares. The stock peaked at almost $5.30 in March 2006 when he was worth more than $10 million, bottomed at $2.10 and recovered to around $2.65.

Rebel Wilson: famous actress and comedian from Sydney, most famous for her role in the Pitch Perfect movie franchise. Estimated net worth of $20 million.

Steve Wilson: executive chairman of Brisbane-based broker Wilson HTM where he has worked since 1984. He owns about 15.3m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.60 in August 2007 when he was worth more than $60 million, bottomed at 80c in December 2008 and recovered to around $2.05.


Ross Wilson
: the former Tabcorp CEO was paid about $15 million to run the privatised gaming company for its first eight years as a public company and left with about $60 million worth of shares which were debt free. With Tabcorp paying him fully franked dividends of almost $3 million a year, the net worth is rising at a solid rate.

Craig Winkler: the co-founder and largest shareholder in accounting software company MYOB until a private equity takeover. The Australian valued at $657 million in 2019.

Chau Chak Wing: property developer was valued by The AFR at $1.55 billion in 2019. The Australian valued at $1.32 billion in 2019

Hui Wing Mau: The Australian valued him at $8.630 billion in 2019.

Peter Wise: as non-executive director owns about 13.6m shares in IBA Health, trading as ISOFT, and is chairman of Tag Pacific, which has interests in electronics and componentry. The stock peaked at almost $1.55 in March 2007 when he was worth more than $13 million, bottomed at 40c in March 2008 and recovered to around 69c.

Withers family: the concentration of this Melbourne family's wealth is directed by the ownership of the 7-Eleven convenience store franchise in Australia. About 400 stores continue to build their wealth. The Australian valued them at $2.085 billion in 2019, whilst The AFR valued them at $1.33 billion. The Australian valued at $2.09 billion in 2019

Phillip Wolanski
: with his father leaving him a property portfolio worth more than $50 million, he has continued to build upon that wealth through prudent property investment and development. The BRW claimed $200 million in 2010.

James Wolfensohn: the former World Bank president may not be an Australian citizen any more, but he's an Australian who started his stockbroking and investment banking career here so his $400 million net worth should be included on any Rich List.

Philippe Wolgen: the CEO of Melbourne-based Clinuvel Pharmaceuticals was paid $20.6 million in 2018-19.

Andrew Wood: CEO of Worley Parsons and has made more thane $20 million from salary and shares over the years.

Graeme Wood: founder and executive director of wotif.com who owns about 50m shares. The stock turned around to $6.60 after it bottomed at $2.70 valuing his stake above $325 million. The BRW claims $255 million.

Roger Wood: a charismatic former Murdoch executive in Australia who went on to launch the international Newlink business in the early 1990s and in 2010 was selling his Balmoral home with expectation it would fetch more than $8 million.

Simon Woodfull: co-founded Bravura, a software provider for wealth management, after becoming frustrated at his previous job because of the lack of money being put into research, which Bravura now thrives on. Made
BRW Young Rich List.

John Woodman: dodgy planning consultant and developer in Melbourne's outer east whose activities brought down City of Casey.

Anthony Wooles: is the founder and former Executive Chairman of maintenance company Pearl Street which was acquired in January 2010 by Australian Laboratory Services. He owned about 38m shares in the company which pushes his wealth north of $19 million.

Children of Alan Woods: the late professional gambler died in 2008, leaving an estate worth more than $900 million, largely thanks to winnings from his computer betting program in Hong Kong. The vast bulk has gone to his son and daughter who are based in Australia. The Australian valued at $542 million in 2019.

Greg Woolley: pops up on the Allco Equity Partners (now trading as Oceania Capital Partners) top 20 with about 25m shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.60 in July 2007 when this investment alone was worth more than $100 million.

Mark Worrell: was worth an estimated $30 million on paper at the top of the boom when a senior executive at Allco Finance Collapse but after the collapse wasn't forced into a fire sale of assets and moved on to Beacon Asset Finance Corp. It wasn't until mid 2010 that he listed his North Shore mansion to sell for $6.8 million, suggesting a degree of financial wealth remains.

Sam Worthington: having been a part of the Australian television scene, he set records in Hollywood with Avatar and then did the Terminator trilogy.

Michael Wright: owns a half share in the Hanwright royalty, which clips the ticket on everything produced by Rio Tinto's Hamersley Iron subsidiary. The other half is owned by Gina Rinehart, based on the discovery by their fathers of the Hamersley iron ore deposit. With the insatiable Chinese demand for iron ore, the Hanwright royalty assures a substantial income for many years to come. The 2010 BRW claimed $2.09 billion. The AFR valued his daughters Alexandra Burt and Leonie Baldock at $2.08 billion in 2019. The Australian valued his daughter at $1.26 billion in 2019

Steve Wyatt
: former general manager of Mineral Resources who owned 16.7m shares worth more than $100m when the stock peaked at almost $7.50 in October 2008. It tumbled to $1.60 in December 2008 but is up near $18 in early 2020.

Rhonda Wyllie: The Australian valued at $464 million in 2019. Daughter of the late Perth entrepreneur Bill Wyllie who was a big wheel in Hong Kong for many years.

John Wylie: the $600 million in transaction costs relating to the Wesfarmers takeover of Coles should be enough to make $20 million in just one deal for the investment banker who in 2007 sold his Carnegie Wylie advisory business to Lazard and pocketed a reported $88 million. Now focused on civic work such as chairing the Victorian State Library.


Megan Wynne: founder of APM, Australia's biggest disability employments services provider, which in early 2020 was sold by one private equity firm to another for a valuation of $1.5 billion. In 2017, a partial stake was sold for a valuation of $400 million where the founder was reported to have retained a 40% stake.

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X 1

Harry Xydas: he founded the engineering and construction DORIC group in 1989 and holds a 62% stake. In 20 years, he has grown the company to an annual turnover of about $400 million.

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Y 8

Michael Yates: a property developer who focuses on apartment developments in Melbourne's ritzy South Yarra.

Oliver Yates: former co-head of Financial Products at Macquarie Bank and brother of former PBL CEO Peter Yates. Was CEO of Clean Energy Corporation and then ran against Josh Frydenberg in Kooyong in 2019.

Peter Yates: made plenty at Macquarie Bank and then collected another $10 million when fired as CEO of PBL before a brief but unsuccessful stint as CEO of the under-performing Allco Equity Partners.

Angus and Malcolm Young: guitarists, songwriters, and co-founders of the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. Check out this excellent explanation of their business savvy by James Thomson on Business Spectator. Malcolm died in 2017.

Bill Young: Sydney-based Hotelier ex-Wallabies rugby player. In 2019, bought Glebe's Friend in Hand Hotel in an off market sale.

Dat Sri Johann Young: former CEO of Sydney-based telecommunications products and services group Nexbis, formally known as Entertainment Media & Telecoms Corp, of which he owned 32 million shares worth $15m when the stock peaked at 50c in August 2008 before declining

John Young: he established Great Southern Plantations as a tax effective agricultural investment for clients and was the largest owner with about 50 million shares. The stock peaked at almost $4.30 in April 2006 and collapsed in 2010, although he'd sold enough to retain a tidy pile.

Spencer Young: former CEO of HFA Holdings owned about 25.5m shares and has survived an earlier association with MFS. The stock peaked at almost $2.80 in July 2007 when he was worth more than $50 million, bottomed at 12c in December 2008 before recovering.

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Z 5

Zagame family: this Melbourne family is one of the 10 largest pokies operators in Victoria although did try to sell in 2019. Once in charge of a greengrocer's business, they expanded into car dealerships, pubs and restaurants before really cashing in on gaming with about 500 machines in Victoria.

Carla Zampatti: the fashion guru and SBS chair lives in a $20 million Darling Point mansion and owns a string of residential properties in Sydney. Her Sydney CBD retail properties would be worth more than $20 million, including one on George Street opposite the Strand Arcade. She also owns property in New York and has firmly entrenched retail distribution through DJs and her own chain of stores.

Doug Zapelli: owner of one of Australia's oldest retailers, the Dimmeys/Forges chain of stores. He has worked in retail all his life as owner of discount chains including Best Buys, and is famed for being as frugal as the prices in the discount stores.

Shi Zhengrong: arriving in Sydney more than 25 years ago as a student of laser technology, he joined a research team at UNSW to complete his doctorate. He changed to the solar technology field and set up a solar panel factory in China for his company, Suntech Power Holdings which was listed on the New York stock exchange in December 2005, confirming the founder as a billionaire. The BRW claims $2.33 billion in 2010 although the company has struggled in recent years.

Eric Zupp: he started out selling Volkswagens which he grew into Queensland's fourth biggest company holding 18 car dealerships. He sold out in 2007 to the Automotive Holdings Group for $117 million. The BRW claimed $144 million in 2010.



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For corrections or new entries to this Rich List, email stephen@maynereport.com